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eBook Life of Pi ePub

eBook Life of Pi ePub

by Yann Martel

  • ISBN: 067697760X
  • Category: World Literature
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Yann Martel
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Knopf Canada (December 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 480
  • ePub book: 1280 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1710 kb
  • Other: mobi docx lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 518

Description

Financial Times "Life of Pi is a great adventure story, the sort that comes along rarely and enters a select canon at once. Martel displays the clever voice and tremendous storytelling skills of an emerging master.

Financial Times "Life of Pi is a great adventure story, the sort that comes along rarely and enters a select canon at once. This would be enough to justify its existence, but it is also rich in metaphysics, beautifully written, moving and funny. Scotland on Sunday "This is compelling storytelling, and Martel is always ready to reel in the reader with a well-turned phrase or tasty aside. Publishers Weekly "Impressive enough to make you, as the old man said, believe in God.

Life of Pi is a Canadian philosophical novel by Yann Martel published in 2001

Life of Pi is a Canadian philosophical novel by Yann Martel published in 2001. The protagonist is Piscine Molitor "Pi" Patel, an Indian Tamil boy from Pondicherry who explores issues of spirituality and metaphysics from an early age. He survives 227 days after a shipwreck while stranded on a lifeboat in the Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger which raises questions about the nature of reality and how it is perceived and told.

Life of Pi is a fantasy adventure novel by Yann Martel published in 2001. The protagonist, Piscine Molitor "Pi" Patel, a Tamil boy from Pondicherry, explores issues of spirituality and practicality from an early age. He survives 227 days after a shipwreck while stranded on a boat in the Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

The way Martel tells the story is very interesting

The way Martel tells the story is very interesting. There's the parallel story of Martel himself going to visit an older Pi who tells the story that we are now reading. There's the occasional zoology lesson interspersed and an examination of faith. All this combined with the brutality of surviving in the Pacific Ocean

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Yann Martel's Life of Pi (Canongate) is another reminder of the largely unsung excellence of the Canongate list.

Yann Martel's Life of Pi (Canongate) is another reminder of the largely unsung excellence of the Canongate list. It would not be out of place on a Booker shortlist. could renew your faith in the ability of novelists to invest even the most outrageous scenario with plausible life.

Life of Pi Martel Yann Hachette Book Group 9780156027328 Янн Мартел: Жизнь Пи : The son of a zookeeper, Pi Patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories.

Life of Pi. Annotation. The Man Booker Prize Winner–2002. The son of a zookeeper, Pi Patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories. Publisher: Harcourt, 2003. When Pi is sixteen, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

The Life of Pi. Author: Yann Martel. Publication Date: September 2001. The Life of Pi: A Novel. com/watch?v mZEZ35Fhvuc. You may also like to read these related eBook documents.

Life of Pi is a masterful and utterly original novel that is at once the story of a young castaway who faces immeasurable hardships on the high seas, and a meditation on religion, faith, art and life that is as witty as it is profound. Using the threads of all of our best stories, Yann Martel has woven a glorious spiritual adventure that makes us question what it means to be alive, and to believe.Growing up in Pondicherry, India, Piscine Molitor Patel -- known as Pi -- has a rich life. Bookish by nature, young Pi acquires a broad knowledge of not only the great religious texts but of all literature, and has a great curiosity about how the world works. His family runs the local zoo, and he spends many of his days among goats, hippos, swans, and bears, developing his own theories about the nature of animals and how human nature conforms to it. Pi’s family life is quite happy, even though his brother picks on him and his parents aren’t quite sure how to accept his decision to simultaneously embrace and practise three religions -- Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam.But despite the lush and nurturing variety of Pi’s world, there are broad political changes afoot in India, and when Pi is sixteen his parents decide that the family needs to escape to a better life. Choosing to move to Canada, they close the zoo, pack their belongings, and board a Japanese cargo ship called the Tsimtsum. Travelling with them are many of their animals, bound for zoos in North America. However, they have only just begun their journey when the ship sinks, taking the dreams of the Patel family down with it. Only Pi survives, cast adrift in a lifeboat with the unlikeliest of travelling companions: a zebra, an orang-utan, a hyena, and a 450-pound Royal Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.Thus begins Pi Patel’s epic, 227-day voyage across the Pacific, and the powerful story of faith and survival at the heart of Life of Pi. Worn and scared, oscillating between hope and despair, Pi is witness to the playing out of the food chain, quite aware of his new position within it. When only the tiger is left of the seafaring menagerie, Pi realizes that his survival depends on his ability to assert his own will, and sets upon a grand and ordered scheme to keep from being Richard Parker’s next meal.As the days pass, Pi fights both boredom and terror by throwing himself into the practical details of surviving on the open sea -- catching fish, collecting rain water, protecting himself from the sun -- all the while ensuring that the tiger is also kept alive, and knows that Pi is the key to his survival. The castaways face gruelling pain in their brushes with starvation, illness, and the storms that lash the small boat, but there is also the solace of beauty: the rainbow hues of a dorado’s death-throes, the peaceful eye of a looming whale, the shimmering blues of the ocean’s swells. Hope is fleeting, however, and despite adapting his religious practices to his daily routine, Pi feels the constant, pressing weight of despair. It is during the most hopeless and gruelling days of his voyage that Pi whittles to the core of his beliefs, casts off his own assumptions, and faces his underlying terrors head-on.As Yann Martel has said in one interview, “The theme of this novel can be summarized in three lines. Life is a story. You can choose your story. And a story with an imaginative overlay is the better story.” And for Martel, the greatest imaginative overlay is religion. “God is a shorthand for anything that is beyond the material -- any greater pattern of meaning.” In Life of Pi, the question of stories, and of what stories to believe, is front and centre from the beginning, when the author tells us how he was led to Pi Patel and to this novel: in an Indian coffee house, a gentleman told him, “I have a story that will make you believe in God.” And as this novel comes to its brilliant conclusion, Pi shows us that the story with the imaginative overlay is also the story that contains the most truth.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Comments

Aurizar Aurizar
When I came to the part in the book where Pi is a boat with a tiger and realized that still had many pages ahead, I thought: “well, this is going to be a boring kid in a boring boat with a boring tiger until he is either rescued or death”. I couldn’t have been more wrong. To say that this novel tells the story of a boy in a boat with a tiger reduces into a lame survival plot all the effort the author makes for this book to convey a great deal of wisdom to the reader.

Yann Martell manages to tell the same man vs. nature themed story in a completely new fashion, loaded with questions about life and death, beliefs, family and spirituality. Survival stories remind us not only that life is worth living but that we can cling to the desire to live as long as we can find a reason to keep fighting, what if the reason to stay alive is life itself? Pi shows us that sometimes it is when we lose everything that we might find ourselves.

I’m hesitant to define this tale as a religious one yet it is deeply spiritual. Pi has a great heart and his soul (his mind, if you rather) craves for knowledge, both physical which is made clear by his interest in zoology and metaphysical which leads him to approach religion. Aristotle said that “All men by nature desire to know” and Pi’s desire to know is nothing else that this natural desire common to all humankind.

I believe that what makes Pi different from other boys (and men) is the fact that he is able to realise that both the physical and metaphysical knowledge are rooted in a common true. The spiritual search of Pi is not the search of someone trying to find a messiah, nor of someone looking for a new lifestyle; it is a pursue of a higher truth. That’s the reason why he can be a pious Hindu. And Muslim. And Catholic. Because he understands that both three religions convey a true message. “I told her that in fact she was not so wrong; that Hindus, in their capacity for love, are indeed hairless Christians, just as Muslims, in the way they see God in everything, are bearded Hindus, and Christians, in their devotion to God, are hat-wearing Muslims”.

Martell gives you a novel with a powerful insight of a very smart and pious boy who clings to life while coexisting with a tiger in the middle of the sea. The words are overwhelming by the deep meaning they convey and at the same time beautifully used to describe an imposing scenario.

This is a book totally worth reading, I totally enjoyed it from beginning to end, loved the characters, yes, it might be a little slow at first and the time spent in the sea to long, but it’s definitely worth it.
Golkis Golkis
I first saw the movie (excellent movie if you haven't seen it) and because the movie was so good, I bought the book. I wanted more detail, which books always have.
However, I wanted to add a warning. The second half of the book is very gruesome and can get a bit tedious with details, sometimes VERY GRUESOME and TEDIOUS with details! It is only the second book I have ever read that I prefer the movie to the book. It has the "heart" of the book without showing all the gore.
That said, I DO recommend the book. I sobbed, smiled and more. Just not for everyone. You'll definitely remember it awhile after reading.
Marilbine Marilbine
The first part of this book was a little difficult to get through. I will admit that at several points I was checking to see how far into the book I was and hoping it would just finish already. However, that's not to say that there were not several points which made me smile. I unquestionably enjoyed this author's writing style. I am not a religious person, however, I did find Pi's religious activities very enduring and thoroughly enjoyed reading about them. Once Pi and Richard Parker were on the boat I felt as though this book picked up quiet a bit. The ending of this book absolutely made this a gem for me. I will not give anything away, but I'm very glad that I finished it and even purchased and watched the movie right after finishing the book just for fun with my husband (who has not read the book). We have now nicknamed our ginger cat Richard Parker.
Era Era
My first recommendation to a reader of Life of Pi is to read it with a highlighter. This book is best consumed for the quotes. I expect that I will be revisiting this books for the wise words gifted to me by Martel among his pages.

That being said this book did not tickle my fancy. It may be because I am a lover of thrillers, and writing that thrusts you through the chapters. This is a book for those who love the journey and don't care to rush to the end. It came repeatedly recommended in my searches for 'books with the best plot twists', which is how it fell into my hands however what I assume was to be the plot twist was more of a bit of plot confusion. I'm still unsure of what really happened and what the real ending is.

I often found myself checking to see how many pages I had left, but admire Martel's ability to come up with ways to keep the plot moving forward on 227 days stranded in the Pacific Ocean. An inspirational tale of survival, endurance, resilience and faith but one I would expect to read for a literature class and not voluntarily in my free time.
Ese Ese
Life of Pi by Yann Martel is about an Indian boy, Pi, who gets shipwrecked with a tiger. Of course there's more to it than that.
Life of Pi takes place in 1970's India where we get the story of Pi growing up in a zoo. The book continues with Pi ending in a shipwreck and having to share a lifeboat with a tiger.
The way Martel tells the story is very interesting. There's the parallel story of Martel himself going to visit an older Pi who tells the story that we are now reading. There's the occasional zoology lesson interspersed and an examination of faith. All this combined with the brutality of surviving in the Pacific Ocean. All of this is told through Pi, through Martel, through Pi which makes it quite a third hand telling.
The ending is however genius as it completely flips the story on its head and you might have a revelation from it.

Overall a great read, and be sure to catch the movie as well!