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eBook Married Life (English and Hebrew Edition) ePub

eBook Married Life (English and Hebrew Edition) ePub

by Dalya Bilu,David Vogel

  • ISBN: 0802111297
  • Category: World Literature
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Dalya Bilu,David Vogel
  • Language: English Hebrew
  • Publisher: Grove Pr; 1 edition (December 1, 1988)
  • Pages: 486
  • ePub book: 1654 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1438 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr azw doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 473

Description

Author and poet David Vogel, who was presumed killed in 1944 at Auchwitz, wrote one book, "Married Life", published originally in 1929 in Hebrew, but then translated by Dalya Bilu and reprinted first in 1988 in English.

Author and poet David Vogel, who was presumed killed in 1944 at Auchwitz, wrote one book, "Married Life", published originally in 1929 in Hebrew, but then translated by Dalya Bilu and reprinted first in 1988 in English. I mention the dates because Vogel was writing contemporaneously about Vienna in the mid-1920's. David Vogel's story is about Vienna in the years after WW1. Anti-Semitism was a constant undertone in Vienna and vestiges of it were present in every-day society. Rudolf Gurdweill, a somewhat published writer, is looking sporadically for paying work but is mainly.

Married Life (in Hebrew: Hayey Nisu'im חיי נישואים) is a novel written in Hebrew between 1927-1928 by Jewish novelist and poet David Vogel. Set in Vienna in the 1920s, Married Life is an urban novel, in which that city had witnessed defeat in the First World War and the collapse of the Habsburg Empire, and plays a central role as the setting it is based in.

ISBN 13: 9780802111296. David Vogel was born in 1891 in Satanov, Podolia (now Ukraine), and when World War I broke out he was living in Vienna, where he was arrested as an enemy alien. He emigrated to Tel Aviv in 1929, but left for Berlin after a year, and later settled in Paris. Text: English, Hebrew (translation).

Book by Vogel, David. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Married Life (Hebrew Classics) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

David Vogel was born in 1891 in Satanov, Podolia (now Ukraine), and when World War I broke out he was living in Vienna, where he was arrested as an enemy alien

David Vogel was born in 1891 in Satanov, Podolia (now Ukraine), and when World War I broke out he was living in Vienna, where he was arrested as an enemy alien. After the outbreak of World War II, he was imprisoned by the French as an Austrian citizen, and later by the Nazis as a Jew. In 1944, he was deported to Auschwitz, where he perished.

In astonishingly vivid detail, Vogel evokes the atmosphere of 1920s Vienna, taking us from fashionable cafés and aristocratic estates to the shoemaker’s workshop and the almshouse. With decadence and poverty existing side by side, Vienna is depicted as a city on the brink of collapse - a haunting prefigurement of the horrors to come.

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Rudolf Gurdweill, a sensitive, poor, young Jewish writer trapped in a masochistic marriage to the anti-semitic Baroness Thea lives a life as tortured as his environment--Vienna in the 1920s

Comments

Muniath Muniath
Author and poet David Vogel, who was presumed killed in 1944 at Auchwitz, wrote one book, "Married Life", published originally in 1929 in Hebrew, but then translated by Dalya Bilu and reprinted first in 1988 in English. I mention the dates because Vogel was writing contemporaneously about Vienna in the mid-1920's.

David Vogel's story is about Vienna in the years after WW1. Anti-Semitism was a constant undertone in Vienna and vestiges of it were present in every-day society. Rudolf Gurdweill, a somewhat published writer, is looking sporadically for paying work but is mainly living the life of a poor bon vivant in Vienna's coffee houses and restaurants. He supports himself by asking friends for money, occasionally publishing something, and sometimes receiving money sent from his sister in America. Gurdweill, a Jew, meets Thea, a baroness from a noble family, rich in tradition, but poor in coin. He falls for her, she tolerates him, and they marry. It's the marriage-from-hell and lasts a few years.

Reviewers accurately point out that the basis of the book is that the Protestant Thea looks down and belittles every part of the Jewish Rudolf (or "Rabbit" as she calls him). They write that Thea represents Christian Vienna and Rudolf represents Jewish Vienna. But here's the problem. David Vogel makes it clear in his book that Thea willingly converts to Judaism and is married in a Jewish wedding ceremony. Why would SHE as the dominant partner, choose to embrace the religion of the weaker partner? In fact, Jews in Germany and Austria had for decades been going the other way; THEY were choosing to convert to Christianity to join the mainstream. The ultimate in assimilation, as it were. The fact that Thea proceeds to mock every part of Rudolf's life - including his, and now her - religion makes this plot point unworkable in my mind as a reader. A more accurate plot would be Rudolf converting to Christianity and then Thea cruelly mocking him for doing so. And, of course, making fun of Judaism, his former religion.

Religion anomalies aside, Vogel's picture of Vienna and its people at the time is beautifully written. He takes the reader back to that troubled time and because he's writing contemporaneously, his observations are particularly reliable and trenchant. A jewel of a book it is.
Felolune Felolune
This book definitely isn't for everyone. But if you loved Robert Walser as well as Arthur Schnitzler, and if you respond to George Grosz's work, then you might be quite intrigued by this curious, often overwrought novel. I somewhat reluctantly gave it four stars, torn between the excitment I experienced in the first half (more or less), where the characters are introduced and establish themselves, and the frank boredom that arose from a tedious repetitiveness of the nightmarish atmosphere in the second half. But the intricacy of psychological details and the quality of the writing (the translation is, to my mind, excellent) pleaded in favor of a recognition of the author's originality and power. I am not sure how old he was when writing this book. Vogel died in Auschwitz and wrote a small oeuvre, but it is notable for its dark irony, its analytic forays into the troubled mind, and its powerfully evocative description. A good editor would have been most welcome..
Jorius Jorius
David Vogel is an incredible novelist and poet who, for rather interesting reasons, is not a well known writer. A reason Vogel has not attained the fame that he merits is that he wrote novels and stories about life in Europe (particularly Vienna), but he wrote them in Hebrew at a time in which Hebrew literature was being recruited for the nationalist cause. His novels were out of touch with the expectations of Hebrew reading audiences, but he was unable to reach other audiences (such as Europeans) because he wrote in Hebrew. Had he written in German, he certainly would have attained the status of authors such as Stefan Zweig, Arthur Schnitzler, Franz Kafka and others. He has been gradually 'rediscovered' and translated and hopefully you will read his work and contribute to a growing appreciation of his position in the canon of European literature in the period between the world wars. I just finished reading this particular novel and am amazed by his ability to capture and convey the psychological nuances that characterize his characters, and I enjoy how he approaches prose writing with poetic sensibilities that allow the reader to truly feel the atmosphere and situations described. I will not say more than that for fear of giving things away, but I heartily recommend the novel, particularly to readers who enjoy European literature from this period.
Zehaffy Zehaffy
Too long