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eBook To Have and To Hold (Victorian Trilogy) ePub

eBook To Have and To Hold (Victorian Trilogy) ePub

by Patricia Gaffney

  • ISBN: 0451405358
  • Category: Historical
  • Subcategory: Love Story
  • Author: Patricia Gaffney
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Topaz (September 1, 1995)
  • ePub book: 1882 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1974 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf mobi txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 888

Description

To Have and To Hold (Victorian Trilogy).

To Have and To Hold (Victorian Trilogy). Both of these things really come through; the countryside, the changing of the seasons, the beauty of nature is so present, so lovingly described in the book that it's like a third major character, with Christy and Anne.

This book works wonderfully on many levels, as a fiction book, and as a romance. It's not at all predictable, which is refreshing.

Gaffney leaves the reader poised on the cliff of expectation, so skillfully keeping the reader's interest, as Sebastian has to make a choice, whether he truly is an unforgivable, irredeemable rake, or if he is a human being who does have ethical boundaries he won't cross. This moment arrives when he invites some of his jaded companions to his house, and allows them to bait Rachel verbally but does nothing. This book works wonderfully on many levels, as a fiction book, and as a romance.

To Love and to Cherish (Victorian Trilogy). I recommend this book for readers who would be able to get beyond the nonconsensual sex and who are willing to experience Rachel’s uncomfortable but incredible journey to regaining her sense of self, and Sebastian’s journey to becoming an honorable person. It was really worth the torment. Addendum: I just finished Gaffney’s Lil.

Intermix books, new york. No, darling, that’s you, he corrected, holding her hands still in her lap. Lili’s English wasn’t fluent, and sometimes she called him the things her own spurned lovers called her. Now, kiss me and say good-bye. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Group (USA) Inc. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, USA. USA Canada UK Ireland Australia New Zealand India South Africa China. Penguin Books Lt. Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. For more information about the Penguin Group visit penguin. This is a work of fiction.

A Victorian Christmas.

364 Kb. The Other Side. J. D. Robb, Mary Blayney, Patricia Gaffney, Ruth Ryan Langan, Mary Kay McComas. A Victorian Christmas. 487 Kb. Second Chance.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. The Saving Graces: A Novel. Download (EPUB). Читать.

It is the middle book in Gaffney's Wyckerly trilogy (begun in "To Love .

It is the middle book in Gaffney's Wyckerly trilogy (begun in "To Love & to Cherish" and completed with "Forever & Ever") but it also stands on its own. This was the first book of Gaffney's that I read and I immediately looked for the rest of them; none of them were anything like it, although she's a wonderful writer. An extraordinary book unlike anything you'll ever read, "To Have and to Hold" is beautifully written and breaks new ground for the romance genre, but is not for those who like their romances sweet.

To Have and To Hold (Wyckerley Trilogy, #2).

Nothing in nature is unbeautiful. ― Alfred, Lord Tennyson. The MaidShe arrived at Darkstone Manor without friends or fortune, welcomed only by the hiss of the sea in the midnight hush. Lily Trehearne had been born a lady, but now she resigned herself to a life of backbreaking drudgery, inescapable poverty. a. To Love and to Cherish (Wyckerley Trilogy by Patricia Gaffney. To Have and To Hold (Wyckerley Trilogy, by Patricia Gaffney.

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Saving Graces and Flight Lessons comes Book II of the Wyckerley Trilog. o Have and to Hold

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Saving Graces and Flight Lessons comes Book II of the Wyckerley Trilog. o Have and to Hold. Suave, cynical, and too handsome for his own good, Sebastian Verlaine never expected to become a magistrate judging the petty crimes of his tenants and neighbors. Rachel Wade has served time in prison for her husband’s violent death, but soon discovers that freedom has its own price.

InterMix titles by Patricia Gaffney To Love and to Cherish To Have and to Hold Forever and Ever To Love and To Cherish . The words in Christy’s Book of Common Prayer began to run together.

InterMix titles by Patricia Gaffney To Love and to Cherish To Have and to Hold Forever and Ever To Love and To Cherish Patricia Gaffney INTERMIX BOOKS, NEW YORK INTERMIX. He rolled his stiff shoulders, fighting off the sleepiness that kept dragging at him. He stood up and went to the window.

After spending years in prison for a crime she did not commit, Rachel Wade accepts the proposal of cynical Sebastian Verlaine, Viscount D'Aubrey, who offers her parole in exchange for becoming his mistress. Original.

Comments

Forcestalker Forcestalker
This was a very interesting romance – some very difficult and uncomfortable circumstances, but very well told. I was a bit disturbed by some of the H’s actions, but because this was not a traditional story-line, I found his transition to be quite interesting, although I may have wanted to slap him a couple of times. The h’s story is incredible, and I felt it was the staying power for this book. Her story alone made it very worthwhile – the romance was the icing on the cake.

Rachel has been imprisoned for murdering her scum of a husband. The author lets us believe that her imprisonment is probably wrongful, but we are not entirely certain of the details – I appreciated the allure of the unknown as far as this part of the story goes. She is released from prison after serving her term, and her treatment is abysmal – and probably very true to the times. She cannot stray far from “home” and has to report in once a week. That being said, her local reputation precedes her, and she is shunned by the community and therefore cannot support herself. She is then threatened with reincarceration for vagrancy (also true to the times).

Her previous imprisonment has left her a shell of a woman, and she presents herself as extremely withdrawn and subservient. To her this was her means of survival, as she had been severely punished if she even attempted to interact with any other human beings during her imprisonment. Sebastian, the H, functions as one of the magistrates and finds some perverse attraction to her and her condition and agrees to take her on as a housekeeper to keep her out of prison. His motivation is a bit sleazy here, as he makes it clear to her that her obligation to him will eventually include some non-housekeeper duties. But she finds this, at least for the moment, more tolerable than the alternative – although the reader understands she is extremely fearful of this impending obligation as her brief sexual experiences with her husband were beyond brutal. In truth, she basically trades one prison for another. She has no choice - he knows this, and exploits it. Her situation is so sad, and the author was very effective in portraying her no-win situation.

Sebastian comes to know Rachel in a way he could not have predicted. I will not spoil this with any more details, but I really enjoyed the journey. I honestly didn’t always like Sebastian, but his redemption is very believable. Rachel’s circumstances and behavior are worth the time to read – I didn’t think the author trivialized or glamorized her situation, which made it quite the bittersweet story. It is sometimes quite uncomfortable to read – for multiple reasons.

There is sex, and I’d warn readers that initially it’s not consensual – it could be considered rape, and although it is not violent it is not glamorized – she says “No,” he ignore it. That was the uncomfortable part, and it took a bit to get past it. The ending was a bit too tidy, and may have been the book’s only other shortcoming. But I thought about this story for days.

I recommend this book for readers who would be able to get beyond the nonconsensual sex and who are willing to experience Rachel’s uncomfortable but incredible journey to regaining her sense of self, and Sebastian’s journey to becoming an honorable person. It was really worth the torment.

Addendum: I just finished Gaffney’s “Lily”…….also a bit angsty. But all I can say is Gaffney must like her heroes on the cruel side…….
Shak Shak
This is a beautifully written, terrible, infuriating story. I knew this was a controversial book when I picked it up, but it's also an influential book in the "romance canon," so I wanted to read it. There are a lot of blogs and articles out there hashing out the merits and moral failings of this book in a lot more detail than I have time to match here. The controversy stems from the fact that--(spoiler alert, though I think every reader should be forewarned at least this much, because here there be triggers)--the hero rapes the heroine, in a harrowing, gut churning scene that spans twenty pages.

Then the hero and heroine both undergo dramatic transformations as characters, which are compelling and emotionally satisfying if you are the kind of person who can get past the whole he-raped-her bit. I am not that kind of person.

I loved Patricia Gaffney's prose. I will read more of her--just nothing quite so rapetastic next time.
Otrytrerl Otrytrerl
“To Have and To Hold” is an apt title, in that Sebastian, the male lead, initially “has” the heroine sexually, and throughout the course of the book, learns to really “hold” her . . . to cherish her.

Readers who love a bona fide dark hero and self-doubting yet steadfast heroine should love this story. Gaffney writes with rapier-like skill. Paragraphs so vivid, that it seemed like a cinema screen unfolding in front of me.

Sebastian is a rake, headed toward thirty with no real accomplishments other than attaining his future title. He’s not into noblesse oblige, he’s into satisfying his own whims. If he were to stay on this particular trajectory, we could only assume he’ll go to seed, done in by his boredom, sexual appetites and contempt for his fellow man. Once he loses his youth and looks, this is a man who won’t have much to offer other than money.

Bravo, Ms. Gaffney, for not sugar-coating this character. As readers, we’re drawn to his seductiveness, his imperious confidence, but we’re also repelled how shallow and self-serving he is. We know he must change, the grist to creating an unforgettable story.

Enter Rachel Wade. We first see her as flattened, graying before her time, bent over from years of bleak imprisonment, for the crime of murder – which she did not commit. As part of the village tribunal about to pass sentence upon her, Sebastian hears the details of her case. She’s charged with a petty crime – stealing apples. When she lifts her head, Sebastian is captivated by her face, particularly her eyes.

Sebastian flexes his power to arrange an unusual sentence – she can either serve out more time, or agree to be his housekeeper, under his “supervision.” His goal is to seduce her, and he wants her to respond to him, not to be limp or comatose or disgusted or traumatized.

While Rachel doesn’t make it easy. After the horrors she’s endured, she understandably has PTSD. However, she is drawn to him. Scenes in this novel feel very intimate, as though you’re “right there” in the room with these characters. Rachel, having suffered greatly, is drawn sharply against Sebastian, who hasn’t suffered or been deprived. His emotional issues stem from a home incapable of love, reared by indifferent parents who reveled in their own bacchanal pursuits.

After ten years in jailed squalor, Rachel finds her way back to a civilized life, interacting with people, enjoying the gardens and flowers, and of course, reading. An enjoyable cast of secondary characters liven up each scene, and the English countryside is vibrant.

Rachel’s suffering makes the reader cheer her on, and Sebastian stepping into the role of a true landowner – actually working, being productive – is gratifying. Far better to be committed to your estate and care about what happens, rather having things handed to him.

At the end, he confesses that he loves her for her kind heart that “neither cruelty nor perversion nor captivity had been able to crush.”

My only quibble with the book is that it seemed to end too abruptly.

This isn’t a read for everyone. I personally prefer darker storylines. If you loved “Flowers from the Storm” by Laura Kinsale, you might enjoy this story, too.