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eBook A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe ePub

eBook A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe ePub

by Marcelo Gleiser

  • ISBN: 1439108358
  • Category: Astronomy and Space Science
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Marcelo Gleiser
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Free Press; Reprint edition (December 31, 2020)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1331 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1286 kb
  • Other: lit txt mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 144

Description

All life, but intelligent life in particular, is a rare and precious accident Chapter 27: Gleiser asserts with undue conviction that "our universe is the result of a quantum fluctuation that burst out of the vacuum".

All life, but intelligent life in particular, is a rare and precious accident. Our presence here has no meaning outside of itself, but it does have meaning. The unplanned complexity of humankind is all the more beautiful for its improbability. Chapter 27: Gleiser asserts with undue conviction that "our universe is the result of a quantum fluctuation that burst out of the vacuum". This is a highly speculative theory of the origin of the universe which is not, and never was, generally accepted. To put it simply, and as a thermodynamics joke, this is HIGHLY unlikely! You see, entropy and all that, yadda, yadda.

The book is organized in 56 rather short chapters in five main sections, followed by an epilogue. I would recommend A Tear in the Edge of Creation, although I prefer Gleiser's other book, The Island of Knowledge, better

The book is organized in 56 rather short chapters in five main sections, followed by an epilogue. I would recommend A Tear in the Edge of Creation, although I prefer Gleiser's other book, The Island of Knowledge, better. But it was worthwhile reading nonetheless.

of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe .

A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe. Without asymmetries and imperfections, the universe would be filled with nothing but smooth radiation. In this lucid, down-to-earth narrative, Gleiser walks us through the basic and cutting-edge science that fueled his own transformation from unifier to doubter-a fascinating scientific quest that led him to a new understanding of what it is to be human. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Marcelo Gleiser (born March 19 1959) is a Brazilian physicist and astronomer A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe, Free Press (April 6, 2010), ISBN 978-1-4391-0832-1

Marcelo Gleiser (born March 19 1959) is a Brazilian physicist and astronomer. He is currently Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Dartmouth College. 1 Early life and education. A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe, Free Press (April 6, 2010), ISBN 978-1-4391-0832-1. The Simple Beauty of the Unexpected: A Natural Philosopher's Quest for Trout and the Meaning of Everything, ForeEdge (June 7, 2016), ISBN 978-1-61168-441-4.

People go to temples, churches, mosques, and synagogues to pray to their divine incarnation of Oneness.

What do Kepler, Newton and Einstein have in common? In addition to being astonishing brainiacs, each scientist was hell-bent on finding a uniform theory to explain all of nature. Dartmouth physics and astronomy professor Marcelo Gleiser, however, argues that no such thing exists

What do Kepler, Newton and Einstein have in common? In addition to being astonishing brainiacs, each scientist was hell-bent on finding a uniform theory to explain all of nature. Dartmouth physics and astronomy professor Marcelo Gleiser, however, argues that no such thing exists. Head to AMNH tonight to hear why. Posted: Thursday March 15 2012.

EXCERPT A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe by Marcelo . Kepler’s mistake was to give his vision of reality a finality it didn’t deserve

EXCERPT A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe by Marcelo Gleiser. Kepler’s mistake was to give his vision of reality a finality it didn’t deserve. Glimpsing at the hidden code of Nature proved so cathartic that he was bewitched and took his belief for the truth. Kepler’s mistake was to forget that a final theory is impossible because we will never know all of reality. Then and now, any science that is tainted with blind belief will lead us astray.

Award winning physicist, Marcelo Gleiser, discusses the quest of the Theory of Everything and evidence that points to a scenario in which everything . Like an exciting ballgame, "A Tear at the Edge of Creation" kept me in suspense

Award winning physicist, Marcelo Gleiser, discusses the quest of the Theory of Everything and evidence that points to a scenario in which everything emerges from fundamental imperfections in matter and time. Inbalance spurs creation; without asymmetries and imperfections, the universe would be filled with nothing but smooth radiation. Like an exciting ballgame, "A Tear at the Edge of Creation" kept me in suspense. However, he has chosen one team to cheer for. Once, he was a unifier himself.

The Dancing Universe: From Creation Myths to the Big Bang, Plume (November 1, 1998), ISBN .

The Dancing Universe: From Creation Myths to the Big Bang, Plume (November 1, 1998), ISBN 978-0-452-27606-2. A Harmonia Do Mundo, Companhia das Letras (2006), ISBN 978-8-535-90889-3. A Tear at the Edge of Creation: A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe, Free Press (April 6, 2010), ISBN 978-1-439-10832-1. Dartmouth College Department of Physics and Astronomy biography and CV. Marcelo Gleiser's personal page at Dartmouth.

Marcelo Gleiser, an award-winning physicist, author, and often called the “Carl Sagan of Brazil,” uses physics to make us think about who we are and what it means to be human. Now in paperback.

Following in the noble footsteps of Galileo, Newton, and Einstein, Marcelo Gleiser grew up believing that nature could be summed up in one elegant equation—that we simply hadn’t found. But after years of working in physics, he began to see the natural world afresh and realized that it is primarily characterized by imperfections—in short, nature is beautiful and it is lopsided, and no grand intellectual edifice underlies it. He realized that human beings have a special role to play in this imperfect cosmos—not because we are created by God, but because we are rare and precious, guardians of life on earth—possibly the most advanced life in the universe.

In a resounding riposte to Brian Greene’s The Elegant Universe, A Tear at the Edge of Creation sets out to change the way we see ourselves in relation to our universe. Gleiser celebrates the uniqueness of our particular planet and enjoins us to recognize that as the universe’s only chance for consciousness, we must be earth’s stewards.

Comments

Jazu Jazu
I'm a fan of Marcelo Gleiser and consider him one of the most thoughtful physics authors. This book is partly autobiographical and partly a narrative of prevailing scientific theories, sretching from particle physics to cosmology to biology. Gleiser says he was once a "unifier" who has more or less given up on unification. Gleiser thinks seeking a Theory of Everything based on elegance, beauty and symmetry is a fools errand because the universe is actually asymmetric and often downright ugly. Furthermore, we owe our very existence to that fact. I'd go a step further by asserting that not only is the universe asymmetric, but it is quite nonlinear and chaotic as well.

Despite the fact that Gleiser abandoned his search for a unified theory, he hopes that science will someday discover it. As for me, such a theory will not be expressed as a formula, an equation, or a group of equations, but it will be revealed as a process instead. In my view, the current so-called laws of nature that are expressed as equations found in science books only describe the behaviors of systems we can measure, and not the underlying processes through which those laws emerge (refer to Erik Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity and inertia). Science won't uncover what the underlying processes are until scientists abandon the reductionist paradigm that has dominated Western thought since Newton and Laplace. Although Gleiser doesn't seem quite ready to abandon reductionism himself, I suspect he might reach that point some day.

Gleiser correctly concludes that the field of cosmology is in a shambles, quoting Leonard Susskind, "We could be wrong about cosmology for the next thousand years. Deeply wrong." I also agree with Gleiser that the probability of intelligent life emerging anywhere is extremely small and so we should consider ourselves to be effectively cut off from any other intelligent life that may exist "out there." Hence, the human species is very special so we should be making more of an effort in caring for each other and our planet. This is one of the most important points he made in the book.

The book is organized in 56 rather short chapters in five main sections, followed by an epilogue. Some other reviews of this book complain there is nothing new to be found in these chapters. I disagree. While it is true that the author doesn't offer any radically new theory that explains everything, he does a pretty good job of banishing the myth that science is getting close to coming up with such a theory and gives very good reasons why science is completely missing the mark.

I would recommend A Tear in the Edge of Creation, although I prefer Gleiser's other book, The Island of Knowledge, better. I didn't give this book five stars because he spent a bit too much time explaining orthodox science, which at times made him seem more like an apologist than a critic of orthodoxy. But it was worthwhile reading nonetheless.

https://sites.google.com/site/amateurscientistessays/
Goltizuru Goltizuru
Wonderfully written, it is worth struggling through the hard parts to get some understanding of how we came to be and, for me at least, a sense of awe for the simple fact of our existence. Ironically, I read "A Tear..." at the same time as I was reading Dava Sobel's "The Daughter of Galileo." Galileo barely escaped death for suggesting the earth moved around the sun; a mere 400 years later we get Gleiser taking us back to the first second after the bang that started it all. Some parts of the book are a hard slog, but as Gleiser urges in the beginning, just keep going for it will get easier and it will be worth it.
POFOD POFOD
Ever more books on science are being published these days for the lay reader. This is a blessing, because it allows those of us who are not proficient in advanced mathematics to appreciate new perspectives that are emerging from the most recent scientific research. Perhaps more important still is that such books allow broader groups of readers to consider the impact of new theories on the myths of the past as well as upon our current set of beliefs. In my mind it is crucial that the widely held beliefs of human societies should remain informed and current rather than rigidly stuck alongside the beliefs of past generations.

The Tear at the Edge of Creation by Marcelo Gleiser is a wonderful contribution to this category of non-fiction. The author is clear and direct in his explanation of current theory from physics to biology and he writes beautifully. In addition in this book he has provided an insightful philosophical perspective as well. He presents two serious themes: The first is that there is no grand design or purpose to the universe. And the second is that science has its own limitations; the search for a `final theory' is based upon a Platonic belief (or alternatively upon monotheistic religion which was influenced by neo-Platonic thought) that is unfounded. Both of these themes resonate with me due to the fact I have written about them in a book of my own, The Bridge, in chapters one and two respectively. I therefore found myself considering and comparing arguments throughout. But beyond such sweeping comparisons, Mr. Gleiser's book takes a very different trajectory. He has painstakingly laid out the evidence to demonstrate that the scientific search for a final theory, a new discovery in physics which would finally unify relativity and quantum mechanics is quite possibly chasing down a blind ally. The belief in a final theory which could explain the fundamental forces of nature is based in a belief in the symmetry of nature. Yet Gleiser argues that there is now ample evidence to suggest that the existence of matter and the presence of life on earth are possible only by virtue of asymmetry. (Hence he has shown through detailed scientific evidence what I myself presented as philosophical propositions.) The intention is not to discourage scientific research. On the contrary science has offered tremendous knowledge of the processes of nature and will continue to do so. But we should not expect that we are even close to discovering encompassing and simple models which will illuminate these processes completely. Rather, as the author says, `we can only know what we can measure.'

Later in the book the author entertains the question of whether life is spread throughout the universe and whether we might find intelligent life on other planets. His argument on this topic is well presented, but a more in depth inquiry into this question is available in a recent book by Paul Davies, The Eerie Silence. In the final chapters Mr Gleiser encourages readers, whether scientists or laypersons, to abandon the view that the universe is the product of a grand design or that it is imbued with purpose. Rather we should accept that the universe itself and we in its tow are the products of chance imbalances in the workings of nature. We should not feel threatened by this knowledge but rather rejoice in it. And we should assume responsibility for preserving this chance `gift' of nature. I couldn't agree more, but I am a little disappointed that the author failed to expand upon and develop this final theme.

David Hillstrom
Whitegrove Whitegrove
Marcelo Gleiser recognizes, without being bombastic or sermonizing, the human need to stretch into wonder. As our learning about the actual vs. the mythical universe continues to unfold, he offers, with wit and clarity, historical and scientifically accurate information as a platform for challenging our thinking about "the enchantment" of current beliefs. He offers clarity in understanding how the expanding information about the universe we live in challenges and enlarges both our spiritual and intellectual comprehension, so that we too can see both the wonder and the information with clear eyes and a new capacity to fit what we are learning into larger, more encompassing ways of thinking and believing.