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eBook Physics Of Star Trek 6 Disp ePub

eBook Physics Of Star Trek 6 Disp ePub

by Lawrence M. Krauss

  • ISBN: 0465056911
  • Category: Astronomy and Space Science
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books; 5th Printing edition (October 19, 1995)
  • ePub book: 1941 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1655 kb
  • Other: mbr azw mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 372

Description

Lawrence Krauss is director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University.

Lawrence Krauss is director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. He is the author of more than 300 scientific publications and ten books, including A Universe from Nothing and The Greatest Story Ever Told -So Far. Krauss is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Yet as Krauss points out, that does not stop discussion of the latest ‘Trek’ over coffee the following day, such as this: ‘ By the same token, not just light but all massless radiation must travel at the speed of light.

Case Western Reserve professor Krauss maintains that Star Trek's writers were sometimes far ahead of scientists . Light cannot be slowed down, let alone stopped in empty space. The Physics of Star Trek (p. 29). Basic Books.

Case Western Reserve professor Krauss maintains that Star Trek's writers were sometimes far ahead of scientists?and famed astrophysicist Stephen Hawking's foreword, endorsing the possibilities of faster-than-light travel and journeying back in time, supports that notion. On the other hand, Krauss also argues that the show is riddled with bloopers and huge improbabilities, as when the Voyager's crew escapes from a black hole's interior.

Krauss is the author of several bestselling books, including The Physics of Star Trek (1995) and A Universe . Krauss is a critic of string theory, which he discusses in his 2005 book Hiding in the Mirror.

Krauss is the author of several bestselling books, including The Physics of Star Trek (1995) and A Universe from Nothing (2012), and chaired the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors. 1 Early life and education. In his 2012 book A Universe from Nothing Krauss says about string theory "we still have no idea if this remarkable theoretical edifice actually has anything to do with the real world". Released in March 2011, another book titled Quantum.

The Physics of Star Trek is a 1995 non-fiction book by the theoretical physicist Lawrence M. Krauss. It is the third book by Krauss, who later wrote a followup titled Beyond Star Trek in 1997. Krauss discusses the physics involved in various concepts and objects described in the Star Trek universe. He investigates the possibility of such things as inertial dampers and warp drive, and whether physics as we know it would allow such inventions.

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The Physics of Star Trek. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Krauss, Lawrence Maxwell. Star trek (Television program), Space sciences, Video games. New York : Basic Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Comments

Talvinl Talvinl
So many of us have grown up watching the Enterprise and crews explore planets, fight aliens, and have nail-biting escapes that we never question the science. How would transporters work? Photon torpedoes? How fast is Warp 9? This book examines the physics of space travel and our current state of the art (not even close). But theoretically….

Yet as Krauss points out, that does not stop discussion of the latest ‘Trek’ over coffee the following day, such as this:
‘ By the same token, not just light but all massless radiation must travel at the speed of light. This means that the many types of beings of “pure energy” encountered by the Enterprise, and later by the Voyager, would have difficulty existing as shown. In the first place, they wouldn’t be able to sit still. Light cannot be slowed down, let alone stopped in empty space. ‘
Krauss, Lawrence M.. The Physics of Star Trek (p. 29). Basic Books. Kindle Edition.

So, those Zetarians or Dal’Rok would have correspondingly slowed senses of time in comparison to ours. He gives credit to the writers for those concepts they do right, and mentions where our current theories could support such plot devices.
This volume must be read by all scify buffs. 5 Stars.
Buzatus Buzatus
Writing a positive review, because I wrote a negative review about another of this author's books. This was an enjoyable read. Any fan of Star Trek would learn a lot about why Star Trek physics are "impossible." Fun, but impossible. Mostly. I like books like this that can explain "how" things need to happen to achieve warp speed or beaming down. The book references all the series. A good read.
Dorizius Dorizius
The Physics of Star Trek, by Professor Lawrence Krauss, is a fun book to read. Who amongst us has not at one time or another wondered while watching Star Trek, either when it first aired, ro in watching re-runs, if all of that magic might someday really come to fruition. Tractor Beams, photon beams, dilithium crystals, the holideck, beaming up and down, a physical exam with a cell-phone like device (without having to have to give a blood sample!: wow!

Professor Krauss, a professor of physics at Arizona State University, is well equipped to assess the possibilities and probabilities of occurrence of all of these dreams. For the most pare, he doesn't come out directly and say something is absolutely impossible or practical: he takes us through an estimate of the energy that might be needed, or the amount of computer storage space that might be needed; we're left to somewhat draw our own conclusions.

As an example: the ever popular tractor beam. Just how might that work? When a tractor beam is sent out to capture and pull in some object, why doesn't the Enterprise also move? We all know that if we tug on one end of a rope and something else tugs at the other end, most likely we'll both move, unless one end of the rope is firmly anchored to something "immovable". What in space might the Enterprise be "firmly anchored" to?

Another example, my favorite: what characteristics of the holideck are possible,and what are impossible? Or is it all possible?

Occasionally Professor Krauss wanders off into the tall grass of astrophysics or of quantum theory, and the text tends toward journalese. But that's ok: it showed to me areas in which his passion for the subject showed through.

I thoroughly enjoyed this little book: 228 pages. A fun read.
Akta Akta
Krauss' book helped pioneer popular science and made the crossover between science and geek science fiction acceptable and mainstream. For this, he should be commended. His writing style is lucid, if a bit wordy, and his enthusiasm for the Star Trek franchise is evident throughout.

Unfortunately, when reading Krauss' defining contribution to pop culture science, one can't help but picture the Comic Book Guy from the Simpsons attempting to correct writers on continuity within the Radioactive Man mythology. Instead of focusing on what Star Trek got right, and how Star Trek has inspired science and the appreciation of science, Krauss is more apt to focus on the negatives. Unlike science writers such as Michio Kaku who look at the science fiction and dare to dream about how such things could be done given our knowledge of the potential trajectory of science today, Krauss boxes himself in and shoots down almost every piece of Star Trek technology based on the economics of energy. Although one can appreciate the pragmatism of looking at energy costs, Krauss doesn't dare to dream of advances in energy technology or physics that could make this possible. He walks a fine line between pragmatism and pessimism, and more often than not, falls over that edge.

It's interesting to think that a man who would rather send robots to space than men would pursue writing a book about Star Trek, but his very hesitancy to support a manned space mission carries some of the same personality that is apparent throughout his book. One could assume that the negativity found within its pages is highly influenced by his personality rather than solely the science.

Although a fun read (and the final chapter discussing science bloopers is very entertaining due to its light-hearted jabbing - the only chapter that doesn't come across as a bit condescending), the book suffers from being light on actual Star Trek information (it simply uses Star Trek to begin a lengthy talking point of in-depth physics), and lacks the enthusiasm and forward-thinking that has made physicists such as Michio Kaku and Brian Greene so popular. It is also unfortunate that a reader today will probably see this book as a rehash of topics that have been covered better in Science Channel programs such as Through the Wormhole and Sci Fi Science, and PBS series' such as Fabric of the Cosmos. Just keep in mind that the original edition of this book not only pre-dates those shows, but helped set the table for them.