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eBook Good Thinking: Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think ePub

eBook Good Thinking: Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think ePub

by Denise D. Cummins

  • ISBN: 0521145503
  • Category: Behavioral Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Denise D. Cummins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (April 16, 2012)
  • Pages: 212
  • ePub book: 1830 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1495 kb
  • Other: rtf azw txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 278

Description

Good Thinking picks up where Thinking Fast and Slow (Kahneman, 2011) left off by showing how slow deliberation and fast intuitions underlie some of the greatest insights that changed the world

Good Thinking picks up where Thinking Fast and Slow (Kahneman, 2011) left off by showing how slow deliberation and fast intuitions underlie some of the greatest insights that changed the world. Seven Powerful Ideas That Changed the World 1. Thinking can be automated so machines can do it, and insight is just subconscious thought. 2. You understand so Good Thinking picks up where Thinking Fast and Slow (Kahneman, 2011) left off by showing how slow deliberation and fast intuitions underlie some of the greatest insights that changed the world.

After reading this book, you will know how the best and brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue . Denise D. Cummins is Adjunct Professor of Psychology and Philosophy at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She joined the faculty in 2005.

After reading this book, you will know how the best and brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue, solve problems and tell right from wrong. But you will also understand why, when we don't meet these standards, it is not always a bad thing.

Good Thinking: Seven Powe. has been added to your Basket. Denise Dellarosa Cummins - philosopher and psychologist - explores the way experts across various fields argue and deal with very challenging issues that directly impact our live. very interesting book for philosophical practitioners, mainly due to the author's interdisciplinary approach and ability to summarize relevant outputs from both human and neurosciences. Fernando Salvetti, Philosophical Practice: Journal of the APPA. Do you know what economists mean when they refer to you as a 'rational agent'?

Denise D Cummins After reading this book, you will be wiser in two ways: You will know how the best .

After reading this book, you will be wiser in two ways: You will know how the best and brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue, solve problems, and tell right from wrong.

Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think. Cummins, D. D. 1992 Role of analogical reasoning in the induction of problem categoriesJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition 18 1103

Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think. 1992 Role of analogical reasoning in the induction of problem categoriesJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition 18 1103. Memory & Cognition 25 415. ubart, . lksnis, . ist, R. 1991 Conditional reasoning and causationMemory & Cognition 19 274.

by Denise D. Cummins. ISBN13: 9780521192040.

Good Thinking : Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think. By (author) Denise D.

Her most recent book is Good Thinking: Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think. By Denise Cummins In a previous article, I described the disastrous outcomes of two real-world attempts to implement Ayn Rand’s principles

Her most recent book is Good Thinking: Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence the Way We Think. By Denise Cummins In a previous article, I described the disastrous outcomes of two real-world attempts to implement Ayn Rand’s principles.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Good Thinking: Seven Powerful Ideas That Influence . This book explains how the brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue, solve problems, and tell right from wrong.

This book explains how the brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue, solve problems, and tell right from wrong.

After reading Good Thinking, you will know how the best and brightest thinkers judge the ways we. .Denise Dellarosa Cummins – philosopher and psychologist – explores the way experts across various fields argue and deal with very challenging issues that directly impact our lives

After reading Good Thinking, you will know how the best and brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue, solve problems and tell right from wrong. Denise Dellarosa Cummins – philosopher and psychologist – explores the way experts across various fields argue and deal with very challenging issues that directly impact our lives A very interesting book for philosophical practitioners, mainly due to the author's interdisciplinary approach and ability to summarize relevant outputs from both human and neurosciences.

After reading this book, you will be wiser in two ways: You will know how the best and brightest thinkers judge the ways we decide, argue, solve problems, and tell right from wrong. But you will also understand why, when we don't meet these standards, it is not always a bad thing. The answers are rooted in the way the human brain has been wired to make us kinder and more generous than economists think we ought to be, but more resistant to change and persuasion than scientists and scholars think is good for us.

Comments

MisTereO MisTereO
Very well written. Excellent examples. Makes one quite aware of own faulty conclusions. Thank you, Ms. Cummins, for your time.
Dogrel Dogrel
This book is not at all original. It's just a popular-market repackaging of textbook material by other people. It gets bogged down in summary after summary of studies, not exactly what you want in a book of this sort. (Hint for Cummins: Journal articles and popular books are a different rhetorical tasks.You have to do more than make the tone conversational.) I was interested in reading her book after reading a nasty, divisive article by her in Psychology Today. This author wrote a hate article about Gen-X for the magazine, I guess because she believes that Gen X hasn't been spit on and beat up enough. It was shocking to see a reputable psychologist joining in with, encouraging, and condoning that sort of bigotry -- a larger, more powerful group stereotyping and demeaning a smaller, less powerful group. As is typical of generation-bashers, she describes Xers as soulless animals who are perhaps to blame for society's ills, even though they have far less political and economic power than her own generation. She's definitely not a "good thinker," but the kind of thinker who divides our culture even more. Oh, how academia has declined.
Kendis Kendis
Most people have a limited understanding of the ideas that shape the way we think, according to Denise Cummins in this book. Lawyers understand argumentation, stockbrokers understand decision theories that drive equity markets, psychologists understand how the brain is wired, and scientists understand scientific investigation, but very few people have an understanding of all of these fields.

The seven ideas which the book discusses are:

* Rational choice, which means making decisions aimed at producing the most desired outcome.
* Game theory, which involves making decisions which are affected by the simultaneous decisions of other people.
* Moral judgment, which includes identifying what is right and what is wrong.
* Scientific reasoning, which includes the use of reason to determine causality, and also the construction and testing of hypotheses.
* Logic, which involves discerning truth from a series of propositions.
* Problem solving, which means searching for solutions which produce a desired result.
* Analogical reasoning, which is about using one situation to help explain another.

In pursuing these different aspects of thinking, the author takes the reader on a journey through an extraordinary range of disciplines including economics, cognitive science, philosophy, morality, mathematics, experimental science, theoretical science, law and business management. We get to see how easily and frequently people are misled into making poor decisions, different ways in which people distinguish right from wrong, the most effective ways of testing hypotheses, and how insights really happen.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book, which I found to be as entertaining as it is informative. Most readers will benefit by having their understanding of what is meant by "thinking" considerably broadened by the book's cross-disciplinary approach.
Zololmaran Zololmaran
This is not really a practical book although the reader can certainly glean some tips on how to improve their thinking by reading it. It is more an examination of the ways in which we think and what is right and wrong with them. The author in the introduction says:

"After reading this book, readers should be empowered to decide for themselves whether human reasoning is as frail or as strong, as dangerous or as benign, or as superfluous or as crucial as it has been made out to be."

The book is relatively short (about 180 pages of text) and thus is a fairly easy read. One certainly does not have to slog through it. It is written in a friendly style and only occasionally gets technical. The author does not go deep into any one type of reasoning but presents seven different modes of thinking (thus the subtitle of the book) on a broader scale. However, despite that one comes away from the book with a decent understanding of each. The seven modes are Rational Choice, Game Theory, Moral Judgement, Scientific Reasoning, Logic, Problem Solving, and Analogical Reasoning.

I really liked this book and can easily recommend it. If you interested in the human mind I think you will like it.
Dagdatus Dagdatus
It's extremely derivative as indicated by the reference section. She doesn't say anything wrong, but there isn't anything that can be considered her own. This reminds me of book reports back in high school, which are pretty much paraphrasing other peoples work. I can't speak for her other books, but this one is not a keeper. She needs to tell us something that we don't already know and more importantly, I'd rather that she tell us about "her" contributions to science and not regurgitate the works of others. I was hoping for some new insight. This book could be rated with fewer or more stars depending on a persons present understanding of the subject. I gave it 3 stars just to be fair, but 5 stars is out of the question.