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eBook Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America (Peterson Field Guides) ePub

eBook Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America (Peterson Field Guides) ePub

by David Beadle

  • ISBN: 0547238487
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: David Beadle
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; Original edition (April 17, 2012)
  • Pages: 624
  • ePub book: 1318 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1859 kb
  • Other: mbr txt azw rtf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 684

Description

Kaufman Field Guide to Butterflies of North America (Kaufman Field Guides) by Jim P. Brock Paperback . There are thousands of moth species in the northeast of North America, and while it might seem that they are all drab grays and browns, there is actually a startling variety.

There are thousands of moth species in the northeast of North America, and while it might seem that they are all drab grays and browns, there is actually a startling variety. They come in a rainbow of colors, from brilliant oranges and pinks to soft greens and violets.

The Peterson Field Guides (PFG) are a popular and influential series of American field guides intended to assist the layman in identification of birds, plants, insects and other natural phenomena. His inaugural volume was the classic 1934 book A Field Guide to the Birds, published (as were all subsequent volumes) by the Houghton Mifflin Company.

There are thousands of moth species in the northeast of North America . I had the opportunity to meet moth enthusiast David Beadle (at a moth trap at night) who imparted his passion of moths, their importance, and their decline. Oct 21, 2012 Earle Baldwin rated it really liked it. Great advance in a true field guide to a very difficult group of insects. Oct 05, 2012 Margaret Roach rated it it was amazing.

Field, Identification Guide. Series: Peterson Field Guides Volume: 30. By: David Beadle(Author), Seabrooke Leckie(Author). 611 pages, plates with colour photos, colour distribution maps. Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. There are more than 1500 species of moths in the northeast of North America, and while it might seem that they are all drab grays and browns, there is actually a startling variety. Many have swirls and swaths of pinks, yellows, and violets. There are moths with colorful leopardlike spots, and ones that look more like B-movie aliens than the moths we try to keep out of our closets.

A Field Guide to Venomous Animals and Poisonous Plants: North America North of Mexico (Peterson. This essential guide to safety in the field features 90 venomous animals and more than 250. 39 MB·420 Downloads·New! This essential guide to safety in the field features 90 venomous animals and more than 250. A Field Guide to Insects: America North of Mexico (Peterson Field Guides(R)). 2 MB·340 Downloads·New! with 1,300 drawings and 142 superb color paintings. Illustrations - which use the unique Peterson. Bryan Peterson's Understanding Photography Field Guide: How to Shoot Great Photographs with Any. 402 Pages·2009·174.

A field guide to the most common moths found in southeastern North America Southeastern North America is home to an incredible variety of moths, from drab browns to bright yellows and pinks, the small and simple to the flashy or bizarrely shaped. Just a few are common house and garden pests; thousands more harmless species live hidden in woods and meadows. This comprehensive guide of more than 1,800 common species is the best tool for identifying and appreciating these ubiquitous insects.

A very comprehensive ID guide to the birds of North America that was beautifully .

A very comprehensive ID guide to the birds of North America that was beautifully produced. by GrrlScientist for ScienceBlogs Scientist. Because the book is larger than the original field guides, the paintings are correspondingly larger, too. All paintings were digitally enhanced by artist, Michael DiGiorgio, so they more accurately represent what a person sees in the field.

The genus appears in North America and Asia, and is widely used for . Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis . is a rare herbaceous species found on mesic sites throughout the central hardwood forests of North America.

The genus appears in North America and Asia, and is widely used for traditional medicine on both continents. Medicinal value has been validated recently through the isolation and ex situ testing of constituent compounds. This species is being harvested from the wild for the medicinal herb trade, although harvesting of goldenseal on public lands in Indiana is prohibited.

Start Using Spectrograms to 'Read' Bird Songs and Calls.

There are thousands of moth species in the northeast of North America, and while it might seem that they are all drab grays and browns, there is actually a startling variety. They come in a rainbow of colors, from brilliant oranges and pinks to soft greens and violets. There are moths with colorful leopard-like spots, and ones that look more like B-movie aliens; some that are as large as your hand, and others the size of a grain of rice. With helpful tips on how to attract and identify moths, range maps and season graphs showing when and where to find each species, and clear photographs that use the unique Peterson arrow system for easy identification, this guide provides everything an amateur or experienced moth-watcher needs. Sponsored by the National Wildlife Federation and the Roger Tory Peterson Institute.  

Comments

Flocton Flocton
At last -- a comprehensive moth guide that shows all the covered species in color and in their natural resting positions! If you've ever struggled to identify a lovely moth on the window screen using black and white photos of pinned specimens with wings outstretched, you'll appreciate that this book fills a long-standing need. The range maps and the placement of information on the same page-spread as the moth's image also make this guide user-friendly, and while it won't take the place of Covell's Moths of Eastern North America, it will make an excellent companion volume.

Butterflies have until now shone brightest in the lepidoptera limelight, but this book should help open many eyes to the beauty and amazing variety of moths.
Hallolan Hallolan
A good introductory book. From it you learn there are currently over 11,000 different moth species recognized in North America. This is a huge number. Consequently, this guide is very region specific: Northeastern United States. I live in the Southeast and have still identified a fair number of moths using it, however. I like the arrows on the illustrations pointing out key anatomical features for each species. It organizes moths by taxonomic rank, so once you learn the basic groups this is a fairly strait-forward guide. All the illustrations are in color. It is a little scant on species account information, but I think that is so they could fit more information on just identifying as many moths as they could. I clearly need a guide more specific to my region.
Velellan Velellan
It's hard to beat a Peterson's guide. I particularly appreciate this one because there are not a lot of publications about moths out there. This one comes complete with wonderful photographs, and all the information you need to identify moths. It's confusing at times, because so many moths look alike, but with this guide, I was able to sort out several species I was unable to without it. Like the bird books, this guide has information about range, but also includes information about host plants, or what kind of environment in which the particular moth could be found. Mothing is not the most popular hobby, but serious moth-ers put out lights and sheets and then photograph their moths to create their "collection" rather than kill the creatures they want to identify. This information is also covered in the guide, which was, frankly, a revelation to me. I love this guide because it opens up a whole world of moths I never really thought about until a facebook friend began posting beautiful moth pictures. I'm hooked now. This guide is just the beginning, I'm sure.
wanderpool wanderpool
The many excellent color plates in this book should facilitate the identification of numerous species of northeastern U.S. moths, as well as give the reader an appreciation of the wide range of colors and forms exhibited by these intertesting insects. The book begins with some general comments about moths including methods of attracting them for study, photography, identification, taxonomy and conservation. The color plates are accompanied by information about the range and food plants of each species. Because of their mostly nocturnal habits most moths with the exception of the spectacular giant silkworm moths such as: the Cecropia, Polyphemus, Luna and Promethea, as well as some of the large Sphinx moths tend not to be noticed by the average person. This book brought back memories of my childhood. I grew up in the country on the outskirts of a small town near the Mississippi River. On a good night hundreds of moths of every size and color would come to the porch light, and I became interested in insects at a very young age. Now, after more than a half century of "development" the moths seem to have gone the way of the bees. All of the sandhills, wood lots and prairies have been bulldozed flat and replaced with shopping centers, housing developments, roads and parking lots. Now, I rarely see more than a few small, drab colored species at the light.
Gralsa Gralsa
My 11-year-old daughter and I love to try to identify bugs and especially moths in the summer, and the 'general' bug book we had, although it was Peterson, didn't have enough, so we looked for and found this book, ordering it immediately. It's been a terrific help in identifying moths and their larvae, plus it's got SO much more in it than the regular Field Guides. (I guess a book with ALL the moths of Northwestern PA along with all other bugs would be terribly big, though, wouldn't it?) My daughter started reading more, too, because she spent so much time looking for matching moths we saw. It really is a beautifully pictured book as well. I found moths I WANTED to see and it became a challenge to try and find moths we hadn't seen in real life because we saw them so beautifully pictured in the book! And we got to, too! It's a terrific book and a great way to spend time with your kids, too.
Bynelad Bynelad
EXACTLY what i wanted. Buy this book if you want to be able to identify moths as you would view them ALIVE in the wild. Buy Covell's book if you want to see moths as they would look dead and pinned to a board. I have not seen any live moths spread eagle in the field. Covell's book was a disappointment to me and really was of very liitle help in assisting in identification. This new edition is a big help in identifying moths. Thank you.
Galanjov Galanjov
This guide does a good job of packing a lot of information into a small space. Covering all there is to cover about moths is daunting but this guide is a good overview for the recreational moth watcher. The pictures show the moths in a natural way, descriptions are by necessity brief but to the point and the flight time bar codes are very efficient and helpful. Additional resources are listed in the book. I use this book as a first step in identification and it is often all I need, but having the additional resources is necessary when dealing with a subject as large and complex as mothing. This book has saved me a lot of time on many occasions and I recommend it.
The Petersons Guide to Moths filled in where the Smithsonian Guide left off. Was amazed to learn about the number of wine drinking moth watching groups out there! This is an essential Guide!