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eBook Darwinian Dominion: Animal Welfare and Human Interests ePub

eBook Darwinian Dominion: Animal Welfare and Human Interests ePub

by Lewis Petrinovich

  • ISBN: 0262161788
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Lewis Petrinovich
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: A Bradford Book (November 26, 1998)
  • Pages: 441
  • ePub book: 1418 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1540 kb
  • Other: lit docx mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 973

Description

Alan M. Steinberg, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles). an outstanding contribution to a difficult debate. Patrick Bateson, Professor of Ethology, University of Cambridge, and Provost, King's College, Cambridge).

The general concept of animal welfare embraces a continuum between negative/bad welfare and positive/good welfare

The general concept of animal welfare embraces a continuum between negative/bad welfare and positive/good welfare. Early approaches to defining animal welfare were mainly based on the exclusion of negative states, neglecting the fact that during evolution animals optimised their ability to interact with and adapt to their environment(s). An animal's welfare status might best be represented by the.

The controversial subject of this book is the permissible use of animals by humans. Lewis Petrinovich argues that humans have a set of cognitive abilities, developing from a suite of emotional attachments, that make them unique among species. Although other animals can think, suffer, and have needs, the interests of members of the human species should triumph over comparable interests of members of other species. This book is the third in a trilogy concerned with the morality of various actions that affect the birth, life, and death of organisms.

Download books for free. Darwinian dominion: animal welfare and human interests. Lewis F. Petrinovich.

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Lewis Petrinovich argues that humans have a set of cognitive abilities, developing from a suite of emotional attachments, that . Lewis Petrinovich is Professor of Psychology Emeritus at the University of California, Riverside.

Lewis Petrinovich argues that humans have a set of cognitive abilities, developing from a suite of emotional attachments, that make them unique among species. He is the author of Human Evolution, Reproduction, and Morality and Living and Dying Well (MIT Press, 1998).

Lewis Petrinovich - Darwinian Dominion: Animal Welfare and Human Interests. Читать pdf. Lewis Pinault - Consulting Demons: Inside the Unscrupulous World of Global Corporate Consulting.

New Biological Books. Richard Wrangham, "Darwinian Dominion: Animal Welfare and Human Interests.

The controversial subject of this book is the permissible use of animals by humans. Lewis Petrinovich argues that humans have a set of cognitive abilities, developing from a suite of emotional attachments, that make them unique among species. Although other animals can think, suffer, and have needs, the interests of members of the human species should triumph over comparable interests of members of other species.

This book is the third in a trilogy concerned with the morality of various actions that affect the birth, life, and death of organisms. Using principles of moral philosophy, biology, evolutionary theory, neurophysiology, medicine, and cognitive science, Petrinovich discusses such topics as fetal and prenatal development, development of the mind and brain, animal liberation, morality and animal research, the eating of animals, keeping animals in zoos and as pets, and the importance of biodiversity. In the epilogue, he summarizes the main issues and discusses the moral principles governing their resolution.

Comments

Cargahibe Cargahibe
Petrinovich does an excellent job of laying out and then applying his particular theory of morality based on the implications of evolutionary biology -- essentially, Petrinovich believes traditional morality is governed to a large extent by sociobiological considerations and that in turn we can learn how to apply morality to controversial issues such as animal rights by examining the evolutionary implications of our actions.
Much of the book is concerned with the debate over animal testing for medical research, and this part of the book is outstanding. Petrinovich aptly defends medical experimentation and punctures holes in both the factual and philosophical claims of animal rights activists, while at the same time presenting a realistic look at genuine problems and debates over medical research.
Unfortunately the book is marred by the final two chapters, one on meat eating and and other on zoos & pets, which seem tacked on to the book as an afterthought. Neither chapter even comes close to the level of the rest of the book -- whereas Petrinovich is very familiar with the literature on medical experimentation, for example, his review of issues in animal agriculture are cursory and rely on a handful of sources with little attempt at a balanced review.
Still, Petrinovich's book is an important contribution to the debate over how humans treat animals.
Nilasida Nilasida
The book disappoints. Factually, there are very powerful cases of non-human animal bonding that exceeds even so-called normal human bonding. Secondly, the author neglects to take seriously the 'argument from marginal cases'. So, for example, autistic children, senile and retarded adult humans and the like, are simply incapable of even the minimal bonding that the author believes inhabits 'normal' humans. The result, on parity of reasoning, is that these marginal humans deserve lesser moral treatment. This seems at odds with our considered moral beliefs; indeed, many of us would think that these humans deserve extra care and consideration. The book is rather philosophically naive and leaves obvious objections unaddressed.