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eBook A Handbook to the Common Intertidal Invertebrates of the Gulf of California (Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Studies in Natural History) ePub

eBook A Handbook to the Common Intertidal Invertebrates of the Gulf of California (Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Studies in Natural History) ePub

by Richard C. Brusca

  • ISBN: 0816503567
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Richard C. Brusca
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press; 2nd Revised ed. edition (June 1, 1973)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1883 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1843 kb
  • Other: docx doc lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 729

Description

The Gulf of California is one of the most interesting ocean ecosystems in the world yet there persists myths that .

The Gulf of California is one of the most interesting ocean ecosystems in the world yet there persists myths that it is both poorly studied and pristine. This book destroys those myths and might be the most important regional oceanography book ever written. Between them the authors have invested at least 750 years studying the Gulf of California, and the chapters document both excellent science and serious environmental degradation. This book will be an instant classic. Paul Dayton, Scripps Institute of Oceanography. From the Inside Flap.

Executive director Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, 2003-2009. book Brusca, Richard Charles was born on January 25, 1945 in Los Angeles, California, United States

Executive director Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, 2003-2009. Director academy programs Catalina Marine Science Center, University Southern California, 1980-1983. Adjunct professor Centro de Investigación en Alimentaciónew york Desarrollo, since 1999. A Handbook to the Common Intertidal Invertebrates of the Gulf of California. P0SV4/?tag prabook0b-20. Common Intertidal Invertebrates of the Gulf of California. Brusca, Richard Charles was born on January 25, 1945 in Los Angeles, California, United States. Son of Finny John and Ellenora C. (McDonald) Brusca.

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by Richard C. Brusca. Published 1973 by University of Arizona Press in Tucson Bibliography: p. 367-417. Second e. rev. and expanded, published in 1980 under title: Common intertidal invertebrates of the Gulf of California. Based on the author's thesis, University of Arizona. Published 1973 by University of Arizona Press in Tucson. Marine invertebrates, In library, Identification. Bibliography: p.

Second e.

Common intertidal invertebrates of the Gulf of California. 1995 Fish predation: a preliminary study of its role in the zoogeography and evolution of shallow water idoteid isopods (Crustacea: Isopoda: Idoteidae). Fish predation: a preliminary study of its role in the zoogeography and evolution of shallow water idoteid isopods (Crustacea: Isopoda: Idoteidae). BR Wallerstein, RC Brusca. Journal of Biogeography, 135-150, 1982.

This timely book provides a benchmark for understanding the Gulf’s extraordinary . Published June 1st 1973 by University of Arizona Press.

This timely book provides a benchmark for understanding the Gulf’s extraordinary diversity, how it is threatened, and in what ways it is-or should be-protected. In spite of its dazzling richness, most of the Gulf’s coastline now harbors but a pale shadow of the diversity that existed just a half-century ago. Recommendations based on sound, careful science must guide Mexico in moving forward to protect the Gulf of California.

A handbook to the common intertidal invertebrates of the Gulf of California, 427 pp. Tucson, Arizona: University of Arizona Press 1973Google Scholar. Dispersion and demography of some infaunal echinoderm populations. 20, 1–11 (1967)Google Scholar. Estado actual de los conocimientos acerca de los equinodermos de México, 380 pp. Doctoral Thesis, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, Facultad de Ciencias 1961Google Scholar.

Published by University of Arizona Press, Tucson (Arizona), in association with ArizonaSonora Desert Museum. xiv + 190 p; il. index. How we measure 'reads'. My dissertation studied mechanisms by which temperature may affect the distribution of two aggressive plant invaders in North America, Bromus tectorum and Bromus rubens.

Tucson (Arizona): University of Arizona Press and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. xiii + 354 p. + 8 p. il. ISBN: 978-0-8165-2739-7. Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Few places in the world can claim such a diversity of species as the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), with its 6,000 recorded animal species estimated to be half the number actually living in its waters. So rich are the Gulf’s waters that over a half-million tons of seafood are taken from them annually—and this figure does not count the wasted by-catch, which would triple or quadruple that tonnage. This timely book provides a benchmark for understanding the Gulf’s extraordinary diversity, how it is threatened, and in what ways it is—or should be—protected. In spite of its dazzling richness, most of the Gulf’s coastline now harbors but a pale shadow of the diversity that existed just a half-century ago. Recommendations based on sound, careful science must guide Mexico in moving forward to protect the Gulf of California.This edited volume contains contributions by twenty-four Gulf of California experts, from both sides of the U.S.–Mexico border. From the origins of the Gulf to its physical and chemical characteristics, from urgently needed conservation alternatives for fisheries and the entire Gulf ecosystem to information about its invertebrates, fishes, cetaceans, and sea turtles, this thought-provoking book provides new insights and clear paths to achieve sustainable use solidly based on robust science. The interdisciplinary, international cooperation involved in creating this much-needed collection provides a model for achieving success in answering critically important questions about a precious but rapidly disappearing ecological treasure.