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eBook Birds of the Southwest: A Field Guide (W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series) ePub

eBook Birds of the Southwest: A Field Guide (W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series) ePub

by John H. Rappole

  • ISBN: 0890969582
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: John H. Rappole
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press (February 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 416
  • ePub book: 1118 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1690 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 599

Description

This book is not really a field guide nor an identification guide. This is due to its layout, the amount of text dedicated to natural history, and the selection of photos

Series: W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series (Book 30). Paperback: 416 pages. Publisher: Texas A&M University Press (February 1, 2001). This book is not really a field guide nor an identification guide. This is due to its layout, the amount of text dedicated to natural history, and the selection of photos. Although the photos and information may be a helpful resource for some of the species, all but a dozen of the photos are limited to only the breeding male. In a sense, this book is an extra long, annotated checklist. It's a reference to document all the birds expected in the Southwest.

Natural History Series) Paperback – January 21, 2004. This book by Mr. Wauer nicely fills a niche for the beginning birder, especially since it discusses national parks, where most campers and visitors are ready to try and understand what surrounds them, such as the bird life. by. Roland H. Wauer (Author). Mark T. Adams, University of Texas. Adams, University of Texas). Wauer, a retired National Park Service employee, continues his work in the field as a naturalist, scientist, and resource specialist. He is the author of Birder's Mexico and Heralds of Spring in Texas. Series: W.

Sibley Birds West: Field Guide to Birds of Western North America.

Only 20 left in stock (more on the way). Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Sibley Birds West: Field Guide to Birds of Western North America.

Gene W. Blacklock was curator of natural history and coordinator for education programs at the Welder Wildlife Foundation in Sinton, Texas, for twenty years. He is currently a wildlife consultant living in Corpus Christi, Texas. Библиографические данные. Birds of Texas: A Field Guide . natural history series (Выпуск 14).

Birds of the Southwest book. California & Southern Nevada (. Start by marking Birds of the Southwest: Arizona, New Mexico, Southern California & Southern Nevada (. Moody, J. Natural History Series, No. 30) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Birds of the Southwest: Arizona, New Mexico, Southern California & Southern Nevada (. 30). John H. Rappole.

Natural History Series). Published by Texas A&M University Press, 2001. He is coauthor of Birds of Texas: A Field Guide also published by Texas A&M University Press, and has written several other volumes on bird identification and migration. Bibliographic Details.

Neotropical Migratory Birds: Natural History, Distribution, and Population Change (Comstock Book). Rappole, Gene W. Blacklock.

book by John H. Neotropical Migratory Birds: Natural History, Distribution, and Population Change (Comstock Book). A Guide to the Birds of the Southeastern States: Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. Birds of the Mid-Atlantic Region and Where to Find Them.

Academic & Professional Books. Field Guides & Natural History. Practical Conservation Equipment. British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Subscriptions from £25 per year. Go to British Wildlife. Conservation Land Management. 4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only.

July 15, 2019 History. New Southwest, Texas. There's no description for this book yet. Birding the Southwestern National Parks (W L Moody, Jr, Natural Histor. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Find nearly any book by John H Rappole. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Birds of the Texas Coastal Bend: Abundance and Distribution (W L MOODY, JR, NATURAL HISTORY SERIES). ISBN 9780890962213 (978-0-89096-221-3) Hardcover, Texas A & M Univ Pr, 1985.

The American Southwest is famous for its dramatic vistas and the exotic animals and plants that inhabit the region. Along with Gila monsters, scorpions, and mountain goats, majestic birds, bring their own unique beauty to the area. California condors fight their way back from extinction in southern California’s remote Los Padres National Forest, roadrunners reside in the saguaro deserts west of Tucson, elegant trogons haunt Arizona’s Cave Creek Canyon, and drippers bob in cataracts of New Mexico’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Birds of the Southwest provides detailed information on identification, habitat preferences, voice, seasonal occurrence, and abundance of more than 450 species of birds found in the southwest deserts, coasts and mountains of Arizona, New Mexico, southern California and southern Nevada. Each species description is accompanied by a may showing the rand and distribution of that species, and color photographs aid in identification. In addition, directions are provided for more than four hundred localities where species can be found.With its complete coverage of avian abundance and distribution in all habitats of the Southwest and its unique listing and description of major birding localities, including photographs of fifty sites, Birds of the Southwest will be an important reference for the beginner and the experienced birder alike.

Comments

Iraraeal Iraraeal
Use this guide every day. It makes enjoying the birds all the more enjoyable.
POFOD POFOD
Pretty light weight. A guide to very very common birds of the southwest. Save your money for coffee and use ibird.
Ieregr Ieregr
Super
Gela Gela
BASICS: softcover; broader overview of the 457 species found in the Southwest region of AZ, NM, southern CA and southern NV; a single color photo (quality ranges from poor to good) shows only the male for all but a few of the species; another 45 b&w photos show various habitats; text describes the bird plus addresses habits, voice, habitat, seasonal presence, and possible locations to find the bird; range map given for each bird; at least 17 species misidentified in the photos

(Perhaps 2.5 stars versus 3). This is really the only book to focus on showing and discussing all the expected (non-rare) birds found in the Southwestern US (see Wyman's book of 1925). The region covered is Arizona, New Mexico, the southern third of California and, the southern tip of Nevada. In all, 457 species are discussed and shown with a range map; and, all but one (Gilded Flicker) are shown with a single, medium-sized color photo of varying quality.

This book is not really a field guide nor an identification guide. This is due to its layout, the amount of text dedicated to natural history, and the selection of photos. Although the photos and information may be a helpful resource for some of the species, all but a dozen of the photos are limited to only the breeding male. In a sense, this book is an extra long, annotated checklist. It's a reference to document all the birds expected in the Southwest. The quantity of photographs (just one per bird) and their quality (poor to good) serve little more than to give the reader a generic view of the bird's appearance. For some birds, the photo is too small or dark to be of use for identification. At the extreme for "poor" photos, at least 17 birds are misidentified.

Some of these errors might be understandable, such as switching the Cassin's and the Western Kingbird. Less likely races for the Southwest are shown, such as a "Myrtle" Yellow-rumped Warbler and the "Slate-colored" Dark-eyed Junco. Mistaking a Tree Swallow for a Violet-green is pushing the envelope of reasonableness. However, there are some truly inexcusable errors. At least six (6) of the shorebirds are wrong. A breeding Sanderling is labeled as a Pectoral Sandpiper. Worse, the Surfbird is actually an American Dipper. The Marsh Wren is really a Dickcissel; a winter plumaged Lark Bunting is labeled as a Sage Sparrow; and, how could anyone confuse a House Finch with an Olive Warbler? Perhaps it was the tiny size and low quality of these photos that attributed to these editorial gaffs.

Another interesting choice of photos was showing the Gray Hawk and the Northern Goshawk as immatures. On a different note, additional 45 black-and-white photographs are interspersed throughout the book to show various habitat types across the Southwest. These help to give a nice representation of the wide array of environments to be encountered in the area.

The text for each bird ranges from one-quarter to one-half page. This material gives a general description of the bird, covering the plumages for gender, age, and season. These descriptions offer the basic portrayal of the birds, sometimes giving a few specific points that might help with the bird's identification. The remainder of the text covers voice, habitat, abundance, distribution, sometimes a similar species, range and, where to find the bird. This last bit of information lists several places by name where the bird may be most likely to be seen in the four states. These place names are given more detail in Appendix 2.

Accompanying each bird is a range map. The bird's range is denoted with four different black-and-white patterns that represent summer, migration, winter, and permanent.

A very handy addition to this book is a 37-page appendix that lists 406 birding sites across the SW region. Although brief with 3-5 lines each, they provide concise, detailed directions. These include specific highway exit numbers, road names, and driving distances. Of the six or seven sites in Arizona I randomly examined, the directions were correct. I can't speak for the accuracy of the other 400. The breakdown for the number of sites per state is the following: Arizona=128, California=136, Nevada=22, New Mexico=120.

For those birders who buy this book, the two things considered as useful will be the range maps and the specific birding sites. These will help to familiarize the birder with where the birds are found across the region; and, will help guide him to locations for any target birds. If you want a book that is geared towards truly identifying the southwestern birds, you will be much better off with a western guide by Sibley, Peterson, or National Geographic. Those books have more plumages, higher quality artwork; and, identify all the birds correctly. - (written by Jack, shown with sample pages at Avian Review, May 2011)

I've listed several related books below...
1) Birds of Southeastern Arizona by Taylor
2) San Diego County Bird Atlas by Unitt
3) Birds of Southern California: Status and Distribution by Garrett
4) California Birds: Their Status and Distribution by Small
5) Field book of birds of the southwestern United States by Wyman
6) Field Guide to the Birds of Western North America by Sibley
7) National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of Western North America
8) The TOS Handbook of Texas Birds by Lockwood
sunrise bird sunrise bird
This is one book that can be judged by its cover: why on earth is there a Dickcissel of all things on the front of a book about the American Southwest? This sort of sloppiness recurs throughout, and is particularly irksome (and for new birders downright dangerous) in the many, many misidentified photos that illustrate the text. The bird-finding section is useless, and the author's coy suggestion that any errors in the directions given should be treated as "part of the adventure" is simply unacceptable. Keep this book out of the hands of beginners!
Gnng Gnng
Product was as described. Excellent service. Would recommend.
Excellent Vendor
Kirimath Kirimath
I was very disappointed with this book. I used to have one that showed pictures of both the male and female birds, this does not.