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eBook A Handbook of the World's Conifers ePub

eBook A Handbook of the World's Conifers ePub

by Aljos Farjon

  • ISBN: 9004177183
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Aljos Farjon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers (May 3, 2010)
  • Pages: 1150
  • ePub book: 1265 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1207 kb
  • Other: lrf txt mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 970

Description

The conifers of the world an introduction He has published 10 books and 55 scientific papers on conifers since 1984.

The conifers of the world an introduction. The distribution and ecology of conifers. The economic importance of conifers. The conservation of conifer diversity. Synopsis of families and genera. Taxonomic treatment of families. He has published 10 books and 55 scientific papers on conifers since 1984.

Aljos Farjon, FLS is a botanist who studied the taxonomy and ecology of conifers at the University of Utrecht, Oxford . I would strongly recommend that superb book over Farjon's "Handbook of the World's Conifers.

He has published 10 books and 55 scientific papers on conifers since 1984. Another excellent choice is "Conifers of the World" by Eckenwalder, who is also a conifer expert.

Conifers are known to everyone as a conspicuous kind of evergreen trees or shrubs that feature prominently in gardens and parks as well as in many managed forests in the cool to cold temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Numerous books have been written about them and continue to appear, mostly with a bias towards these uses in Europe and North America

As far as the gymnosperms (conifers) are concerned, they are known as a conspicuous kind of evergreen trees or shrubs that are grown prominently in gardens and parks as well as in many managed forests in the Northern Hemisphere (Farjon, 2010). They were represented by only 5 species in the current study.

This new handbook of the conifers is departing from this traditional approach in that it includes all the world's 615 .

This new handbook of the conifers is departing from this traditional approach in that it includes all the world's 615 species of conifers, of which some 200 occur in the tropics.

the World's Conifers (2 vols. Any institution, group or individual growing conifers as a collection for display or conservation should have a copy of Farjon's A Handbook of the World's Conifers.

A Handbook of the World's Conifers (2 vols. Mark Richardson, Botanical Consultant, Australasian Plant Conservation Vol. 19 No. 3 (De. 010 - Fe. 011) show more.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Handbook Of The World's Conifers as Want to Read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Handbook Of The World's Conifers as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Cupressus guadalupensis Drawing by Aljos Farjon. This handbook does not with emphasis on horticulture in Europe. Those that describe or illustrate conifers that are only known are mostly compilations of species and their culti- in cultivation.

In part because Farjon’s A Handbook of the World’s Conifers lacks distribution maps, the ‘companion volume’ An Atlas of the World’s Conifers (Farjon & Filer 2013, Fig. 1) was published, with maps based on herbarium collections for all taxa.

Aljos Farjon is pleased that these data are to be used for training purposes. A Handbook of the World's Conifers. An Atlas of the World's Conifers. Records, unless introduced or cultivated, can be mapped. Taxonomic information is provided with full synonymy, citation and types. A. Farjon and D. Filer, 2013).

Conifers are known to everyone as a conspicuous kind of evergreen trees or shrubs that feature prominently in gardens and parks as well as in many managed forests in the cool to cold temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Numerous books have been written about them and continue to appear, mostly with a bias towards these uses in Europe and North America. This new handbook of the conifers is departing from this traditional approach in that it includes all the world's 615 species of conifers, of which some 200 occur in the tropics. It gives as much information about these and the Southern Hemisphere conifers as about the better known species, drawing on research into the taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution and uses by the author over nearly 30 years. The result is a truly encyclopedic work, a true handbook of all the world's conifers, richly illustrated by the author with his line drawings and photographs taken from the natural habitats of the species.

Comments

Burirus Burirus
2009-2010 have seen the publication of two comprehensive reviews of the world's conifers, a welcome respite given that nearly 20 years have passed since the last attempt to do this. One of the books, Eckenwalder's "Conifers of the World" (Conifers of the World: The Complete Reference), is affordable, and useful despite many minor flaws. The other, this two-volume masterwork by Farjon (handbook? it takes two hands just to pick it up!), is detailed, definitive, expensive, and will remain the gold standard on the subject for decades to come. Farjon worked at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew until his retirement, and in that capacity it was his job to travel the world, see all of its conifers, sort out their taxonomy, assist and develop programs to protect the threatened and endangered ones, and document all this. In the process he published 11 books, mostly technical in nature, although his A Natural History of Conifers is great for popular audiences. These two volumes are the summary of that life's work. They include 50 pages of topical discussions about distribution, ecology, economic importance, and conservation of biodiversity, before diving into just under 1000 pages of genus and species descriptions. Each taxon (8 families, 69 genera, 615 species, and quite a few varieties/subspecies) receives a detailed description along with notes on its distribution, ecology, conservation, and uses. There are a goodly number of full-page lines drawings by the author, as well as 362 color photographs, most showing the species in their native habitat. If you are passionate enough about conifers to pony up the price of these two weighty tomes, you will never regret it.
Burisi Burisi
This is a very detailed botanical text with description and keys of families and genera and full descriptions and taxonomic notes of each species. The layout is OK, it can be somewhat difficult to find the start of each species description as one seems to run into another. I would have liked more images, both photographic and illustrative, of each species beside the descriptions. Having photos clustered together might make for more economical printing costs but for such a definitive text it would have been superb to have the text support by easily referenced imagery.
Akinozuru Akinozuru
I had high hopes when I ordered this book, not having seen it before. The author (Farjon) is an authority on conifers, and I already have several of his other books on conifers and pines. This book is valuable in providing an updated compendium covering all of the world's conifers. It provides keys to distinguish the various species within genera, along with detailed verbal descriptions for all species. The layout for the headers is not always clear-cut, and the section headings for species sometimes occur at the bottom of a column and are not as obvious as they should be, making it awkward to navigate through the pages to find what you want.

Other reviews state that the book is well illustrated. I disagree. Certainly the quality of the line drawings is excellent, but there are far too few of them to make the book useful overall. This aspect of the book is very disappointing. There are many successive pages without any illustrations whatsoever. Entire genera pass by with nothing more than verbal descriptions, and maybe a color photo of the whole tree (or foliage) located on a distant page. The small color photos are all grouped together on the same inset pages, and they rarely show the full suite of characters for a species. For many genera, only a few of the species are even included as color photos. There are superb line-drawing illustrations in the author's more popular book "A Natural History of Conifers" that are not even repeated in this book, not to mention the many drawings in his book on pines (you will need to buy that book separately if you want to see them). This omission seems very puzzling. If the author has these illustrations, why are they not included in a book that purports to be a tome on the world's conifers? Instead, we read about genera such as Sequoia, for example, with no detailed illustration whatsoever, and only a color photo of the trunks in a forest and a photo of uncharacteristic foliage with green cones. This happens over and over again, one genus after another. When you come to one of the rare line drawings, it's always very useful and shows all of the various organs of the plant, but really, these diagrams are far, far too few. That makes the book very limited for really visualizing the diversity of the world's conifers, which after all is what a comprehensive book like this is supposed to do (especially at this price!). A picture is worth a thousand words, but instead of illustrations, this book usually gives the thousand words instead, one species after another.

A more recent book by Debreczy and Racz (2012) entitled "Conifers Around the World" is similar in size (actually a bit larger) and price to Farjon's book, but provides a much better illustrated, more alluring, and comparably authoritative account of the world's conifers (organized by regions of the world). That book is more limited in its distribution but easy enough to find if you do a search. There are probably ten times more illustrations in that book (3700 color photos!), including several for each and every species. I would strongly recommend that superb book over Farjon's "Handbook of the World's Conifers." Another excellent choice is "Conifers of the World" by Eckenwalder, who is also a conifer expert. Eckenwalder's book has many illustrations accompanying the descriptions (although some of them are not the greatest quality), and his text descriptions about species often include conceptual discussions that are more interesting than the routine categories of Farjon's book.

I wish I could say that this book fulfilled its potential, but it didn't. It did a great job of talking about the conifers, but it failed to provide the comprehensive illustrations that are so important for a book like this.