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eBook Aquagenesis: The Origin and Evolution of Life in the Sea ePub

eBook Aquagenesis: The Origin and Evolution of Life in the Sea ePub

by Richard Ellis

  • ISBN: 0670030236
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Richard Ellis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Viking Adult (October 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1151 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1147 kb
  • Other: lit docx lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 213

Description

Ellis recounted some of the theories about the origin of life. this is a great book to read about the evolution of sea organisms evolving into land animals. very good black and white drawings by the author.

Ellis recounted some of the theories about the origin of life. One person found this helpful.

Life on earth began in the sea, and in this tour de force of natural history, authority on marine biology and illustrator Richard Ellis chronicles more than three billion years of aquatic history.

Richard Ellis (born April 2, 1938) is an American marine biologist, author, and illustrator

Richard Ellis (born April 2, 1938) is an American marine biologist, author, and illustrator.

Aquagenesis, The Origins and Evolution of Life in the Sea by Richard Ellis (2001). The Cichlid Fishes: Nature's Grand Experiment in Evolution by George Barlow (2002). Monks, Neale; Palmer, Philip (2002). Trilobite, Eyewitness to Evolution by Richard Fortey (2000). Parallel Adaptive Radiations - Caribbean Anoline Lizards.

Life on earth began in the sea, and Richard Ellis traces it from the first microbes and fish to jawless, finless .

Life on earth began in the sea, and Richard Ellis traces it from the first microbes and fish to jawless, finless creatures that evolved into the 26,000 species. Decent overview of most marine animal evolution. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 14 years ago. Author Richard Ellis in Aquagenesis originally sought out to document in a popular science format how the ancestors of marine mammals, reptiles, and birds returned to the sea. Richard Ellis manages the daunting task of compressing 300 million years of evolution into a very readable book - Natural History.

Life on earth began in the sea, and Richard Ellis traces it from the first microbes and fish to jawless, finless creatures that evolved into the 26,000 species alive today including sharks, whales, penguins, dolphins - and humans. Along the way he raises fascinating post-Darwinian questions and answers others. Bestsellers in Marine Fauna & Flora. Handbook of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises.

Aquagenesis: The Origin and Evolution of Life in the Sea. By Richard Ellis. A WELL-PACED tour of man's efforts to dwell beneath the sea, from Alexander the Great's visit to the sea-bed in a glass barrel during the siege of Tyre in 332 BC via Jules Verne's Captain Nemo, Hans and Lotte Hass and Jacques Cousteau-the sea-going musketeer who brought the underwater world into our living rooms-to Buster. Crabb who made a wartime career out of underwater bomb disposal and later disappeared in circumstances that have never been properly explained.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Aquagenesis : The Origin and Evolution . Retraces the story of life on Earth by revisiting the oceans, where life began and still flourishes in more than 26,000 known species.

Retraces the story of life on Earth by revisiting the oceans, where life began and still flourishes in more than 26,000 known species.

Photo by Richard Ling licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version or any later version. Here, we can see different types of starfish, coral reefs and fishes in the Great Barrier Reef. Great Barrier Reef, want to go next time i go back to australis. Biodiversity of a coral reef. Corals adapt to and modify their environment by forming calcium carbonate skeletons. Ocean Creatures, Underwater Creatures, Underwater World, Under The Ocean, Life Under The Sea, Leafy Sea Dragon, Deep Blue Sea, Beautiful Sea Creatures, Beneath The Sea. Deb Comstock.

The Origin and Evolution of Life in the Sea. Published September 27, 2001 by Viking Adult In library, Origin, Evolution, Marine animals, Life. There's no description for this book yet. Published September 27, 2001 by Viking Adult. In library, Origin, Evolution, Marine animals, Life.

The renowned marine biologist retraces the grand story of life on earth by revisiting the oceans, where life began and still flourishes in more than 26,000 known species.

Comments

Fearlesssinger Fearlesssinger
Author Richard Ellis in _Aquagenesis_ originally sought out to document in a popular science format how the ancestors of marine mammals, reptiles, and birds returned to the sea. In the process of researching the book Ellis became intrigued with the phenomenon of life in the water, from the origin of life itself - which likely took place in water - to the evolution of marine invertebrates and fish. As result, the scope of the book widened considerably.

Ellis recounted some of the theories about the origin of life. The main one he reviewed was that life may have first appeared around hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, perhaps from impact generated hydrothermal systems (as for a period of about 200 million years, very roughly between 3.9 and 3.8 billion years ago, the Earth may have experienced as many as 10,000 impacts by extraterrestrial bodies). Not only would such environments have been plentiful, but they would have aided by virtue of high temperatures the creation of organic compounds and would have been places shielded from ultraviolet radiation.

I found fascinating his discussion of the Ediacaran (or Vendian) fauna, the oldest recorded animals, fossils of soft-bodied organisms that lived between 565 and 535 million years ago. The Ediacaran fauna is unusual; many of these organisms come in strange shapes and sizes, have no recognizable fronts, backs, heads, tails, circulatory, nervous, or digestive systems. Many of them vaguely resembled modern jellyfish, though they appear to have been benthic (or bottom-dwelling) organisms ranging in size from a few millimeters to a meter in diameter. One researcher (Gregory Retallack) according to Ellis believed that the Ediacarans were not soft-bodied animals at all but rather a type of lichen, with a sturdier structure made of substances not unlike chitin. Another paleontologist, Adolf Seilacher, wrote that the Ediacarans are unrelated to any existing lifeform (calling the Ediacarans as a group the vendozoans) and postulated that their structure was rather like that of an air mattress.

The much discussed Burgess Shale fauna is well covered in this book, along with the highly publicized disagreements between the late Stephen J. Gould, who felt the bizarre fauna represented many weird, wonderful, failed experiments, and Simon Conway Morris, who felt that researchers had focused too much on the differences rather than the similarities of the Burgess Shale animals to known species and phyla.

Ellis provided a good summary of squids, octopi, ammonites, belemnites, and the nautiloids (including the five existing species of nautilus), though much of his short section on trilobites quoted or paraphrased (with due credit) Richard Fortey's excellent book _Trilobite_. I think he could have been much more thorough though in his very brief discussion of the eurypterids (sea scorpions).

The evolution of fish is given wonderful treatment, accompanied by (as is much of the text) by Ellis' skillful black and white illustrations. I found his coverage of the coelacanths particularly interesting, noting some of the mysteries that even the living fish present (such as the function of their "rostral organ" - perhaps it is used to detect weak electrical fields). I also enjoyed his section on bioluminescence, something that still presents an enigma to biologists (such as how the luminous bacteria that some species depend upon to light up in the ocean depths are acquired, particularly if they cannot exist outside of their host and the young of the species are not born with the bacteria already present). Also worthwhile was Ellis' reporting of the Bear Gulch Limestone Formation of Montana (dating back to 320 million years ago from the Mississippian), a truly excellent fossil site that has yielded 4,500 specimens representing 113 species of fish, many beautifully preserved. A number of unusual fossils have been found there, such as the shark _Damocles serratus_, so named because of a dorsal spine with a serrated edge underneath, one that hung over the head of the animal, not unlike the sword that hung over the head of Damocles in ancient Greece.

Although not marine animals, the evolution of vertebrate limbs is covered as well. Ellis summarized the writings of Jenny Clack and others, noting the theory that the early amphibians used their legs not for terrestrial locomotion but for movement in the water or on river and lake bottoms, and that the study of the origin of tetrapods and the invasion of land by vertebrate animals are two issued that (according to researchers E. B. Daeschler and N. Shubin) need to be "decoupled."

Reptiles aren't given as much coverage as one might think. While sea snakes, crocodilians, and sea turtles are very well covered (the latter with a nice rundown of living species), the Mesozoic marine reptiles are given short shrift. Ellis has said in his subsequent book on Mesozoic marine reptiles, _Sea Dragons_ that he cut them out of _Aquagenesis_ due to space requirements.

The evolution of penguins and particularly marine mammals - sea otters, seals, walruses, whales, dolphins, porpoises, manatees, and dugongs - has some of the best coverage of any subject in the book. Particularly interesting were the problems with the pinnipeds (seals) in the fossil record, how they appear already to be fairly well specialized in the Miocene (about 24 million years ago), lacking much in the way of transitional forms; also the possibility of separate ancestors for the eared seals and walruses (perhaps a bearlike progenitor) and the earless seals (maybe an otterlike ancestor).

Near the end Ellis presented the controversial Aquatic Ape theory that humans descended from an ancestor that may have spent a fair amount of time in shallow coastal waters. Citing evidence presented by Alister Hardy and Elaine Morgan that man may have had an aquatic past - the presence of large amounts of subcutaneous fat, hairless bodies, the only terrestrial mammals that can hold their breath, that humans can swim almost from birth, noses well adapted to keep out water from nasal cavities - Ellis also recounted the opposition this theory has met.

Though I found a few errors in the book, overall it was enjoyable.
Lyrtois Lyrtois
Awesome book about the evolution of marine animals. Very heavy on scientific vocabulary and species names, but I'm a marine bio student, so that was no problem for me.
Ballazan Ballazan
I read the author's very good "Encyclopedia of the Sea" and hoped this would be equally entertaining. It seems this book is more for people who already know a lot about ancient life. There are illustrations, but not enough as the author will describe bizarre, one of a kind creatures, but then not have a drawing of it. He describes contraversies about where a fossil belongs in the classification tree or if a new branch has to be added. I found the "Shape of Life" video much more interesting. This book seems to be a scholarly work, with many quotes and credits given, for other scholars.
Arcanefist Arcanefist
This book should be required reading for anyone involved in environmental sciences or marine biology. Packed with information it would take years to gather on your own.
Ericaz Ericaz
I bought this book after reading the author's previous "Search for the Giant Squid". Giant Squid was very good. This book however,is a double edge sword, it has great illustrations and the topics look interesting, BUT many facts are wrong!
Examples: page 2, states that the Dinosaurs "disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago" (65 million years would have been correct.) Page 117 identifies the Mississippian Age Bear Gulch Formation as Devonian Age. Page 51 and 52 and 53 list Horseshoe crabs as dating from 200 million years ago but there are well known horseshoe crabs as old as 370 million years old!
Page 53 also lists Aglaspids as being horseshoe crabs when they are not considered to be.
I teach, and the accuracy of material is important. I don't want to present ideas to my students if they aren't right. The book is interesting, but the errors I see at a quick skim make me pause.
Whitescar Whitescar
I have a copy of this book, and I would highly recommend it to anyone who wishes to know more about animal history, before, during and after life emerged from the ocean. As a simple lay person without a biology degree, this book has been a great asset to me personally when seeking answers about primitive creatures. This book introduced me to many creatures I'd never heard of, and indepth information on ones I had. It's one of my favorite books and much treasured. -Sharon Mooney, NC, USA
Mr.mclav Mr.mclav
this is a great book to read about the evolution of sea organisms evolving into land animals. very good black and white drawings by the author.