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eBook What is Life?: How Chemistry Becomes Biology ePub

eBook What is Life?: How Chemistry Becomes Biology ePub

by Addy Pross

  • ISBN: 0199641013
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Addy Pross
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1924 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1480 kb
  • Other: docx rtf lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 441

Description

The merging of chemistry and biology 67. Woese CR, Goldenfeld N, How the microbial world saved evolution from the Scylla of molecular biology and the Charybdis of the modern synthesis.

The merging of chemistry and biology. 67.

How chemistry becomes biology. Some 65 years ago another renowned physicist, Erwin Schrödinger, wrote a book whose catchy title What is Life? directly addressed the issue. Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP, United Kingdom.

But what exactly do we mean by the term ‘understand’? When addressing most day-to-day questions, there seems to be no need to explain the term-it is self-evident. n, the issue turns out to be more complex. What we mean by ‘understanding’ goes to the very heart of the scientific method and beyond, forcing us to at least briefly address basic philosophical questions that have weighed on mankind for over 2,000 years.

Read online books written by Pross, Addy in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Pross, Addy: What is Life?:How Chemistry Becomes Biology. Author of What is Life?:How Chemistry Becomes Biology at ReadAnyBook. 5. The Knotty Origin of Life Problem. 6. Biology’s Crisis of Identity. 7. Biology is Chemistry. Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. Oxford is a registered trade mark of. Oxford University Press in the UK and in certain other countries. 8. What is Life? References and Notes. I spent the afternoon musing on Life. If you come to think of it, what a queer thing Life is!

Addy Pross received a P. in Organic Chemistry from Sydney University in 1970 This book fills an important gap in the quest to explain how life could have emerged from precursor processes and it forms an important addition to the growing concept o. .

Addy Pross received a P. in Organic Chemistry from Sydney University in 1970. He is currently a Professor of Chemistry at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and a recognized authority in the area of chemical reactivity to which he contributed with the highly cited and acclaimed Pross-Shaik model of chemical reactivity. This book fills an important gap in the quest to explain how life could have emerged from precursor processes and it forms an important addition to the growing concept of "universal Darwinism". The author identifies systems chemistry as the field of study that leads to his approach.

In his new book, What is Life? How. Chemistry Becomes Biology, Addy Pross takes. on perhaps the most difficult scientific ques-. This question is exactly as the. title of the book reads, and it has remained.

As Addy Pross tells us through systems chemistry the study of simple replicating systems has revealed an extraordinary connection- that Darwinian theory, that quintessential . What is Life?:How chemistry becomes biology. Oxford University Press.

As Addy Pross tells us through systems chemistry the study of simple replicating systems has revealed an extraordinary connection- that Darwinian theory, that quintessential biological principle, can be incorporated into a more general chemical theory of evolution, one that encompasses both living and non-living systems . he realization that chemistry and biology connect up in this fundamental way will prove, we believe, to have profound implications, some of which are already apparent, for example, the unification of abiogenesis and biological evolution. 2. Hoffmann, Peter M. (2012-10-30).

So how does chemistry give rise to biology? What could have led the first replicating molecules up such a path? Now, developments in the emerging field of 'systems chemistry' are unlocking the problem. Addy Pross shows how the different kind of stability that operates among replicating molecules results in a tendency for chemical systems to become more complex and acquire the properties of life

So how does chemistry give rise to biology? What could have led the first . Addy Pross shows how the different kind of stability that operates among replicating molecules results in a tendency for chemical systems to become more complex and acquire the properties of life. Oxford Landmark Science books are 'must-read' classics of modern science writing which have crystallized big ideas, and shaped the way we think.

Seventy years ago, Erwin Schrodinger posed a profound question: 'What is life, and how did it emerge from non-life?' This problem has puzzled biologists and physical scientists ever since. Living things are hugely complex and have unique properties, such as self-maintenance and apparently purposeful behaviour which we do not see in inert matter. So how does chemistry give rise to biology? What could have led the first replicating molecules up such a path? Now, developments in the emerging field of 'systems chemistry' are unlocking the problem. Addy Pross shows how the different kind of stability that operates among replicating molecules results in a tendency for chemical systems to become more complex and acquire the properties of life. Strikingly, he demonstrates that Darwinian evolution is the biological expression of a deeper, well-defined chemical concept: the whole story from replicating molecules to complex life is one continuous process governed by an underlying physical principle. The gulf between biology and the physical sciences is finally becoming bridged.

Comments

Stan Stan
This is a very good book. Life he defines as having purpose I agree. Evolution is a fact as much as a such things in the past can possibly be proven. Similarly, we evolved from the same primitive life forms that all life on this planet arose from. However, his proof that purpose is an emergent property falls very short. The origins of life are still a huge mystery. Like the origins of the universe which also seems to have a purpose, the origins of life may lie outside of sciences' capabilities. It is good, even imperative that we try to search and research for the answers to these questions regardless that we may not be able to find them. Addy Pross' book is another step in the right direction.
Yggfyn Yggfyn
This is a book about abiogenesis; how chemical auto-catalytic replicating molecules developed metabolism (energy gathering abilities) and complexification in it's continuing "drive" toward Dynamic Kinetic Stability, and gradually became what we today call biology.

There is a good deal of enlightenment here.
As chemistry merges into biology.
Enticing insights and illumination on the topic of the abiogenesis of Earth life.
Very worthwhile.
A very illuminating and fascinating and persuading way of describing what we know about life's processes and emergence from chemical reactions.

Dynamic Kinetic Stability. Persistence.
Replication. Metabolism (Energy gathering capabilities).
Complexification. Reaction Networks Formation.
Systems Chemistry.

"A working definition of life: a self-sustaining kinetically stable dynamic reaction network derived from the replication reaction."

"The moment some non-metabolic (downhill) replicator acquired an energy-gathering capability, could be thought of as the moment that life began."
Clandratha Clandratha
As a chemist, I was fascinated by the central theme of this book. Without spoiling it, the basic idea is a unification of the biological and chemical sciences, explaining both in terms of a chemical effect. The book is a bit too wordy for my taste and its central concept, dynamic kinetic stability, seems under-developed. The author cites systems chemists haphazardly, which causes the central argument of the book to rest on shaky foundations (to say the least).
Centrizius Centrizius
The work is very well based and argued. Some people say that is repetitive, but it is the way of Inductive Reasoning.
Having saying that, I recommend that before read it, read Lynn Margulis (all), Kevin Kelly (What Techium wants and Bootstrapping Complexity), Harold Morowitz (The emergency of Everything); probably it's worth to read too Steven Strogatz (Sync) and Sean Caroll (Serengeti Rules) too.
After this, although none author referred by him, you will better appreciate the deep impact of these insights here exposed.
Conjukus Conjukus
Review for Amazon
Pross A, (2012) What is Life? How Chemistry becomes Biology. Oxford University Press
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This book fills an important gap in the quest to explain how life could have emerged from precursor processes and it forms an important addition to the growing concept of "universal Darwinism". The author identifies systems chemistry as the field of study that leads to his approach. He looks for intermediate stages that are precursors of "life" and proceeds to spell out the likely role of autocatalytic chemistry occurring at a deep oceanic vent as the source of RNA from which life could have arisen. His description of this process leads on to identifying dynamic kinetic stability (DKS) as the particular variety of stability for these stages. DKS is not usually observed in regular chemistry but occurs in the persistence of entities capable of self-reproduction.
He invokes the Second Law of Thermodynamics to explain why "chemical reactions proceed such that less stable materials are transformed into more stable materials". Preservation of stability is seen as essential to the survival of systems. Any cyclic system and its complex successors must be subject to the occurrence of variants (error) that may be self-corrected or may become incorporated in the system where they may have negative, neutral or positive effects. Negative effects prevent survival. Neutral effects can be incorporated harmlessly in the system. Positive effects may offer a benefit in adapting to the environment in which the system operates.
Somewhere along the chain of events there should be a system which allowed the emergence of a facility to multiply from a precursor state that could only recycle itself without producing copies of itself.
I await his next book that should look toward other precursor systems to connect the cyclic self-organising physical systems operating under Newton's Laws of Motion with the self-replicating systems associated with DKS and thus further, towards life.
Azago Azago
Mr. Pross lays out an intriguing and rational argument regarding the origin of life while raising questions (albeit not necessarily new) concerning just where an organism ends.

I originally picked this up as an Audible book, but found I that there were some sections I wanted to jump to, so I picked up the Kindle version for the WhisperSync mostly for the ability to add in annotations and make it easier to review the sections that I needed more time to wrap my head around.
Coiril Coiril
This was a brief read, but I enjoyed it. It offers a new perspective on how life could have emerged from inanimate matter by examining the system dynamics of self-replicating molecules. Long story short, the author proposes that natural selection would have operated on early self-replicating molecules in the form of dynamic kinetic selection.

You do not need a detailed knowledge of chemistry to enjoy this, but a competent knowledge of it, as well as competence in basic biology, will enable full comprehension of the book.

The only flaw with this book is that it does not go into as much detail as I'd like. I hope that the author publishes a more academic level text in time.