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eBook Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans ePub

eBook Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans ePub

by Richard Ellis

  • ISBN: 0700612696
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Richard Ellis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas (September 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 312
  • ePub book: 1345 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1526 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 364

Description

With this book, Richard Ellis complements his previously published works on living marine creatures with a riveting . Prehistoric life, especially during the time of the dinosaurs, is one of the larger categories of science literature in terms of books published annually

Prehistoric life, especially during the time of the dinosaurs, is one of the larger categories of science literature in terms of books published annually. Hence there are a lot of good books out there to read, for all reading levels. This is not one of them. Richard Ellis is a respected author in the field of marine biology, and as a reader I expected more from this book.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Sea Dragons: Preators of the Prehistoric Oceans written by Richard Ellis is a wonderful book. This is the first book to present a detailed summary of the history on marie reptile paleontology. He begins with a splendid critique of the so-called "Loch Ness Monster", reminding us that it was a hoax perpetrated by several enthusiastic British in 1934.

Richard Ellis (born April 2, 1938) is an American marine biologist, author, and illustrator. The Life and Death of Animal Species, Sea Dragons: Predators of Prehistoric Seas, Tuna, The Empty Ocean, and Swordfish: A Biography of the Ocean Gladiator.

While the subject of ancient ocean predators is almost inherently interesting, I did come away from this book wondering just who it was written for. This is seeing as the deep concern Ellis has for tracing the interpretive debates over the remains we have of these animals is probaly not what grabs the average reader. Not that this is a bad thing, it's just a point the unwary need to be aware of.

University Press of Kansas. At the same time we promise that the reading will be very enjoyable. Starting with the general overview of the marine reptiles, the author goes through each of the related topics in detail.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans . Ellis has written the paleohistorical equivalent of Jaws

Ellis has written the paleohistorical equivalent of Jaws. His exploration of the past brilliantly showcases creatures more astonishing than any Loch Ness Monster we can dream u.

Working from the fossil record, Ellis explores the natural history of these fierce predators, speculates on their habits, and tells how they eventually became extinct or did they?

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Items related to Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans

Items related to Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans. Richard Ellis Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans. ISBN 13: 9780700612697. Sea Dragons: Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans.

Working from the fossil record, Richard Ellis explores the natural history of these fierce predators, speculates on their habits, and tells how they eventually became extinct - or did they? He traces the 200-million-year history of the great ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and mosasaurs who swam the ancient oceans - and who, according to some, may even still frequent the likes of Loch Ness.The first book about these animals in nearly a century, Sea Dragons draws upon the most recent scientific research to reconstruct their lives and habitats. Along the way, the book also provides insights into and tales about the work, discoveries, and competing theories that compose the world of vertebrate paleontology.

Comments

Grinin Grinin
This book has potential but not in it's current state. It is shot through with typos, changes in font, and improperly copied illustrations. There are times I'm not sure what is meant by a sentence. If it weren't for this I'd give it a 5 star rating.
wanderpool wanderpool
There is a great deal of information regarding the life of prehistoric aquatic reptiles. Unfortunately, these amazing creatures have always been relegated to a single chapter in the majority of dinosaur-oriented books (No, these creatures were not dinosaurs, nor were they related to them). Or the most in-depth publications were steeped in the literature of scientific texts.
Richard Ellis, like Robert Bakker and Carl Zimmer, has opened the door for the rest of us. Through this great book he is allowing us-- the average reader with an interest in the sciences-- to be a part of that world. His book is a total compendium that describes all the major families of these reptiles: Icthyosaurs, Mosasaurs, Pliosaurs, and of course that perennial candidate for the Loch Ness Monster, the Plesiosaurs.
Thank you, Richard Ellis. I love this book!
Xar Xar
wish he wrote more
Ylonean Ylonean
Sea Dragons is not for everyone. I wanted to know more about these marine reptiles and the book helped me accomplish that goal. However at times, it was tough sledding! I had to persevere through many dry, dull, and confusing paragraphs to get there.
It seems to me that the author wrote the book as follows: he did an extensive literature search, took notes on 5 X 7 cards, sorted the cards by topic (kind of) and wrote the book from the card information. The result is a ton of detailed information but not without its problems. There are contradictions throughout the book. There are vast differences of opinion between the experts cited. They remain unresolved. The author seldom, if ever, weighs in to settle the disputes. Also, the technical jargon can be a huge obstacle to comprehension (at least for the layman readers). The author is keenly aware of this and tries to massage the problem. However he doesn't consistently do it nor does he always do it at the introduction of new terminology.(e.g., He never defined "pinniped" until after numerous pages of using the term).

It is hard to come away from this book with many generalizations about marine reptiles that seem firmly grounded. There is far too much equivication. For example, just how the marine reptiles used their four flippers to propel themselves is still a big mystery to me. The paleontologists can not seem to agree on this according to Ellis. Surely, some ranking of importance of the different theories could be made.

One observation I made and the author seems to have missed is the important difference in the tails of these creatures. The ichthyosaurs have a fishlike tail, the pleiosaurs and pliosaurs have a reptile-like tail (round in cross-section and tapered), and the mosasaurs have an oar-like tail. Knowing this, I can tell from the pictures, what the animal is.

The ichthyosaurs seemed to me to be the best adapted because they were most fishlike. Yet they went extinct first. The author says that new fish had evolved which ate the ichthyosaur young. Wouldn't those also be able to eat the plesiosaur, pliosaur and mosasaur young?

To the author I say, " You have done a lot of good goundwork but this book isn't finished. You need to thoroughly revise this book and deal with the contradictions, try to form some conclusions and generalizations from all the data, and do more to solve the jargon problem. The illustrations were vital. You need even more of them. Why? because the binomial names are meaningless babble without the picture of the animal. Also, provide some graphics to show order, family, genus and species of these animals. I can't see the forest for the trees.

Ralph Hermansen May 3, 2008
Siralune Siralune
Tons of knowledge and easy to understand, even for a layman.
inetserfer inetserfer
Knowledgeable author, fine bibliography, interesting subject, nice drawings. However, the presentation of the material is poorly organized; long chapters with long descriptions do not follow a general structure, making them difficult to read. Emphasis is more on the history of discovery rather than on the evolution of the different species, with no cladistic analysis.
Funny duck Funny duck
A very good start for anyone interested in prehistoric reptiles. Enough details to be interesting, but you don't need a lot of background in paleontology to get through it.
I have finished it yet seems ok