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eBook Significant Others: The Ape-Human Continuum And The Quest For Human Nature ePub

eBook Significant Others: The Ape-Human Continuum And The Quest For Human Nature ePub

by Craig B. Stanford

  • ISBN: 0465081711
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Craig B. Stanford
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (May 9, 2001)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1436 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1518 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf doc azw
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 876

Description

Significant Others book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Significant Others book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Significant Others: The Ape-human Continuum And The Quest For Human Nature as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Thus if we want to learn about human nature and how we came to be as we are, we have to look to the apes to tell u. his is a sweeping, fresh, controversial book on what the science of primates can tell us about our own natures.

Significant Others' is about the continuum between humanity and the great apes Chapter after chapter explores the continuum of ape and human

Significant Others' is about the continuum between humanity and the great apes. What was once a bold line dividing us has turned out to be fairly blurry. In his Introduction, he sets out by addressing hat he sees as key myths about early humans (they were clumsy bipeds, their hunting defined key aspects of their evolution, et. From there, he explores a wide ranging set of issues. Chapter after chapter explores the continuum of ape and human. All in all, a very readable and provocative volume.

Significant Others: The Ape-Human Continuum and the Quest for Human Nature, 2001. The Hunting Apes : Meat Eating and the Origins of Human Behavior, 1999. Chimpanzee and Red Colobus : The Ecology of Predator and Prey, 1998.

In Significant Others, Craig Stanford thoughtfully considers the ape-human continuum and the quest for human nature as he persuasively argues that the gap between apes and humans is very narrow, and not a vast unbridgeable realm. Stanford's argument draws close associations between apes and humans, considering their complex societies, social groups, and communications.

By: Craig B Stanford(Author). 236 pages, no illustrations. Publisher: Basic Books

By: Craig B Stanford(Author). Publisher: Basic Books. By: Craig B Stanford(Author). Bestsellers in Human Evolution & Anthropology. Who We Are and How We Got Here.

What the family connection between apes and humans really means. Evolutionary scientists know that the line that divides humans from other animals has grown increasingly blurry, yet many other fields, especially in the social sciences, have not really absorbed this knowledge. At the same time, the knowledge that all humans are genetically and cognitively modern has left the apes as our only true "savages. Thus if we want to learn about human nature and how we came to be as we are, we must look to the apes.

Find nearly any book by Craig B. Stanford. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Craig B. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Anthropologist specializing in apes, human evolution and human behavior

Anthropologist specializing in apes, human evolution and human behavior. Chair, anthropology department, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. Associate professor of anthropology. Faculty fellow, Center for Excellence in Teaching. Author, Significant Others: The Ape-Human Continuum and the Quest for Human Nature (2001), The Hunting Apes: Meat Eating and the Origins of Human Behavior (1999), Chimpanzee and Red Colobus: Ecology of Predator and Prey (1998) and The Capped Langur in Bangladesh (1991).

In Significant Others, the co-director of the world-famous Jane Goodall Research Center uses our recent knowledge of great ape behavior to examine (and puncture) many myths about humans-about infanticide, mating practices, the origins of human cognition, the human diet, language, and many other subjects. Evolutionary scientists know that the dividing line between humans and other animals has grown increasingly blurry-it's even become a cliché to note that we share 99 percent of our genes with chimpanzees. Yet this knowledge, while superficially accepted, has not really been absorbed by many fields, especially the social sciences. At the same time, the knowledge that all humans are genetically and cognitively modern, no matter how "primitive" we may find them, has left the apes the only true "savages." Thus if we want to learn about human nature and how we came to be as we are, we have to look to the apes to tell us.This is a sweeping, fresh, controversial book on what the science of primates can tell us about our own natures.

Comments

Blackbrand Blackbrand
Stanford notes his thesis thus (page xi): "Apes and humans are cut from the same evolutionary cloth; all that fundamentally distinguishes us is posture, we being upright walkers and the apes quadrupeds . . . 'Significant Others' is about the continuum between humanity and the great apes. What was once a bold line dividing us has turned out to be fairly blurry. . . ."

In his Introduction, he sets out by addressing hat he sees as key myths about early humans (they were clumsy bipeds, their hunting defined key aspects of their evolution, etc.). From there, he explores a wide ranging set of issues. Part One examines "Love, Death, and Food." Part Two looks at "Culture, Language, and the Trouble with Evolutionary Psychology." He provocatively entitles Part Three "Islands in the Human Sea."

Chapter after chapter explores the continuum of ape and human. One important issue here is, as he notes (page 206): "The great apes and we form a pint-sized cluster of five species that are the tips of one of the great lineages in Earth's history."

All in all, a very readable and provocative volume.
MrDog MrDog
This is one of the most beautifully written science books I've ever read. I've been a fascinated reader of archaeology, anthropology and paleontology (including punctuated equilibrium) since about age 10--as each science has evolved and changed from discovery to discovery. What an exciting 72 years it has been! I decided to re-read this very personal book, published in 2001 for general readers. It's a superior (and still relevant) introduction to the new science of Primatology, from the viewpoint of a field scientist and classroom teacher who values moderate evolutionary psychology but is suspicious of extreme views by writers from any perspective. A long-time associate of Jane Goodall, Dr Stanford is that rarity--like Stephen Jay Gould and a few others--who knows how to write with wit and grace.

The entire book is a plea for the survival and significance of our nearest relatives, the higher primates. As a feminist I was jarred by the evidence for patriarchal control and racism in our human heritage, which Dr Stanford also seems uncomfortable with. He is grateful for the growing number of women observers like Goodall and Fossey and researchers like Hrdy, but I wish that he had done long term personal observation of bonobos as much as he has with chimpanzees and gorillas.

He is consistently insistent that human nature and nurture must work together and that a moral culture is more than DNA. Social Darwinism, which Darwin himself disliked, has been in resurgence for over 40 years in the West (except that the religious fanatics can't admit their dependence on warped Darwinian science for their oppressions), and it is a tool used by the conceited humans who set out to destroy the rest of the world for their own short-term greed, but I sense that people, especially youth, are sick of the destructiveness and are turning things around. I'd highly recommend this book to them--and to anyone!
Aurizar Aurizar
Craig Stanford is a good authority on the subject. He holds the position of the Director of the Jane Goodall research institute (And if you dont know who she is, perhaps you should begin with The chimpanzees of Gombe, written by her).
The book is wonderfully written and easy to read. The reason I am not giving it five is that the writer seems to digress from the central theme often. However, there is some wonderful elaboration of chimpanzee societies and their rituals, that brings a sense of eerieness to our own humanity and makes one sit up and think.
The book is wonderfully balanced and brings out many hitherto covered truths - such as the male dominated bastion of anthropology and hence masculine myths propagated, the views of the 'science' of evolutionary psychology etc. This is a book which allows you to develop your own theories after stating the facts of chimp interactions in a highly narrative and gripping story-format.
All in all a good book. If you are the kind who has a book collection of origins books which include Leakey and Jared Diamond, then Craig Stanford deserves his place there. If you are not a collector and are not planning on buying this, then check with your library and do read this, but read this you should - if indeed you have an interest in anthropolgy and the origins question.