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eBook Making PCR, A Story of Biotechnology (CHINESE LANGUAGE edition) (Philosopher's Stone Series) ePub

eBook Making PCR, A Story of Biotechnology (CHINESE LANGUAGE edition) (Philosopher's Stone Series) ePub

by Paul RABINOW

  • ISBN: 7542818805
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Paul RABINOW
  • Language: Chinese
  • Publisher: Shanghai Scientific & Technological Education Pubg House (1999)
  • ePub book: 1405 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1181 kb
  • Other: txt lit mobi doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 317

Description

Making PCR: A Story of B. .has been added to your Cart

Making PCR: A Story of B.has been added to your Cart. He chose Cetus, a company that developed a procedure called the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, a method for replicating large amounts of DNA from tiny samples. After his descriptive and analytical introduction, Rabinow collects a series of interviews with staff (current and former) of Cetus and intersperses them with further exposition, observations and analysis.

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Making PCR explores the culture of biotechnology as it emerged at Certus Corporation . Paul Rabinow paints .Rabinow's book belongs to a burgeoning genre: ethnographic studies of what scientists actually do in the la.

Making PCR explores the culture of biotechnology as it emerged at Certus Corporation during the 1980s and focuses on its distinctive configuration of scientific, technical, social, economic, political, and legal elements, each of which had its own separate trajectory over the preceding decade.picture of the process of discovery in Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology teases out every possible detail. "Rabinow's book belongs to a burgeoning genre: ethnographic studies of what scientists actually do in the la.-Daniel Zalewski, Lingua Franca.

Making PCR. A Story of Biotechnology, University of Chicago Press, 1996. Essays in the Anthropology of Reason, Princeton University Press, 1997.

Электронная книга "Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology", Paul Rabinow. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Polymerase chain reaction, Biotechnology. Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-190) and index. Chicago : University of Chicago Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. pbk ed. External-identifier.

Kary Mullis was a Cetus employee when he conceptualized and did initial PCR validation experiments. For his role in PCR invention Kary Mullis was awarded Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1993, the first ever Nobel prize awarded to a work done at biotech. posted by David Usharauli

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology . This book explores the culture of biotechnology as it emerged at Cetus Corporation in the 1980s, looking at its scientific, social and economic elements.

This book explores the culture of biotechnology as it emerged at Cetus Corporation in the 1980s, looking at its scientific, social and economic elements. University of Chicago Press.

Comments

Vital Beast Vital Beast
Very compelling! Wonderful narrative to begin to grasp historicity along with innovation.
Gralsa Gralsa
An interesting read, occasionally weakened by obtuse style. Interviews with those involved were enlightening, as were author's observations on industry / academic collaboration in biotech.
If you're in the mileu (Aaaaah!!!), read the book.
Zehaffy Zehaffy
Paul Rabinow, professor of anthropology at UC Berkeley, has scrutinized the invention and development of a major biotechnological tool that underlies most present-day gene detection and manipulation. This book tells the story of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the basis of personal interviews with most of the major players as well as extensive reading of the scientific and autobiographical literature. It is really several books in one: a somewhat cerebral analysis of the ultimate meaning of science in human affairs, a historical account of the emergence of PCR, a description of the issues surrounding the rise of the biotechnology industry, and a trenchant account of the roles individual psychology and personal character play in research, especially in the industrial context. Different readers may wish to concentrate on some of these elements and gloss over the others. It's a rich tapestry of a book and I plan to return to it from time to time as one or another of its themes addresses my current interests. This book belongs on the required reading list of anyone either in or contemplating a career in biotechnology. Ditto for historians of post-WWII science.
Axebourne Axebourne
I found the ethnographic approach to be a good way for those of us without a hard science background to look at biotechnology. Some of the explanations of the processes involved in the advancements made that led to PCR were a bit over my head, but interestingly, were not necessary for me to understand the bigger (and I think more important) aspects of the story. It showed me the human element behind scientific progress that I had not considered before; the chance encounters, relationships, personal challenges, influences on ideas, and personalities behind the science. I was assigned this book as a class reading and was not thrilled at the task at first, but I have garnered a new perspective on and a better understanding of biotechnology in the process. Not bad at all.
Tat Tat
Making PCR becomes just deceptive at the end. Such fashionable network analysis - "a la Latour" - is directly linked with the rising of a new sort of extreme relativism, or Nihilism - it is not odd when the same author is a Foucaldian follower... His micro-analysis does not provide much information apart from an account of the well-known interests of every individual within a scientific community. The author displays some interviews and traces the ties of a social web which supposely explains something (?). However, it is indeed a good example of current constructivist approaches. The monography achieves to explain what is going on in the creation of PCR - just from the point of view of the socials relations around the scientific fact- , but it does not explain much about the relation between social variable and content of knowledge, so the content of science is again black-boxed. There is not much interest in such approach apart from the similarities with other precedent works (Knorr-Cetina, Latour, Woolgar, Mulkay and so forth.)
Otrytrerl Otrytrerl
Very entertaining biographical account of the discovery of PCR, individuals, corporations, money and financial risk in biotech. Highlights the solitary, individual act of scientific discovery and how this can be decoupled from corresponding financial reward (science is not business, business is not science).
Zainian Zainian
"Making PCR" starts slowly; the opening is more for academic anthropologists than for readers interested in biotechnology, so wade through it. The story of PCR is intertwined with the story of Cetus Corporation, which is developed more fully in "Biotechnology Backstage" by former Cetus scientist Paul Aebersold and available from Kabel Publishers. "Making PCR" constrains itself to such an academic view that it leaves out the most amazing part of the story, a fight started by Kary Mullis at a Cetus scientific retreat that got him demoted to the bench to concentrate his efforts on PCR!
Paul Rabinow is an anthropologist who studies molecular biologists. He tells the story of the development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique that revolutionized molecular biology. Rabinow succeeds in writing a book about science that is entertaining and informative to scientists and non-scientists alike. This book provides a first-hand examples of an unexpected revolution resulting from an unassuming research project, and the long road from concept to product. See also "French DNA" by Paul Rabinow and "The Golden Helix" by Arthur Kornberg.