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eBook Seeing Stars: Sports Celebrity, Identity, and Body Culture in Modern Japan (Harvard East Asian Monographs) ePub

eBook Seeing Stars: Sports Celebrity, Identity, and Body Culture in Modern Japan (Harvard East Asian Monographs) ePub

by Dennis J. Frost

  • ISBN: 0674056108
  • Category: Earth Sciences
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Dennis J. Frost
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Asia Center (February 6, 2011)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1647 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1875 kb
  • Other: doc lrf rtf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 474

Description

Dennis J. Frost is Wen Chao Chen Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies at Kalamazoo College. Series: Harvard East Asian Monographs (Book 331).

Dennis J. Hardcover: 352 pages. Publisher: Harvard University Asia Center (February 6, 2011). ISBN-13: 978-0674056107. Product Dimensions: . x . x 9 inches. Frost traces the emergence and evolution of sports celebrity in Japan from the seventeenth through the . Sports Celebrity, Identity, and Body Culture in Modern Japan. Frost traces the emergence and evolution of sports celebrity in Japan from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries.

concept is absent from the index in Frost’s work. The book is part of the Harvard East Asian Monographs Series. As befits the subject

concept is absent from the index in Frost’s work. As befits the subject. matter the book is a scrupulous history of how and why it became acceptable and indeed. century to the recent past. It is written and presented in a style consistent with rigorous.

Kobe, Tiger, Messi, Márta, Sachin, and Serena can be recognized from most points on the globe. More from New Books in East Asian Studie.

Oct 04, 2017 Malcolm rated it really liked it. Shelves: cultural-studies, sport-studies, sociology. One of the many presumptuous things that we tell ourselves about the histories of both sport and of celebrity is that they were invented in the Anglo-American, North Atlantic world and dispersed across the rest of the world in lines set by colonialism, trade, commerce and settlement.

Beginning in the late 1800s, when Japan’s modernization program was spilling into sports, Dennis looks at the prominent place of star athletes in the nation’s culture through the 20th century. His case studies feature some of the most famous figures in Japanese sports: the sumo grand champion Hitachiyama, track athlete Hitomi Kinue, baseball pitcher Sawamura Eiji, and champion boxer Gushiken Yoko. Country of Publication.

Traces the emergence and evolution of sports celebrity in Japan from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries. Dennis J.

Kobe, Tiger, Messi, Márta, Sachin, and Serena can be recognized from most points on the globe.

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Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Asia Center, 2010. The Game of Their Lives. Blood and Guts in Japanese Professional Baseball.

In Seeing Stars, Dennis J. Frost traces the emergence and evolution of sports celebrity in Japan from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries. Frost explores how various constituencies have repeatedly molded and deployed representations of individual athletes, revealing that sports stars are socially constructed phenomena, the products of both particular historical moments and broader discourses of celebrity.

Drawing from media coverage, biographies, literary works, athletes’ memoirs, bureaucratic memoranda, interviews, and films, Frost argues that the largely unquestioned mass of information about sports stars not only reflects, but also shapes society and body culture. He examines the lives and times of star athletes―including sumo grand champion Hitachiyama, female Olympic medalist Hitomi Kinue, legendary pitcher Sawamura Eiji, and world champion boxer Gushiken Yokoō--demonstrating how representations of such sports stars mediated Japan’s emergence into the putatively universal realm of sports, unsettled orthodox notions of gender, facilitated wartime mobilization of physically fit men and women, and masked lingering inequalities in postwar Japanese society.

As the first critical examination of the history of sports celebrity outside a Euro-American context, this book also sheds new light on the transnational forces at play in the production and impact of celebrity images and dispels misconceptions that sports stars in the non-West are mere imitations of their Western counterparts.