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eBook A Beginner's Guide to Immortality: Extraordinary People, Alien Brains, and Quantum Resurrection ePub

eBook A Beginner's Guide to Immortality: Extraordinary People, Alien Brains, and Quantum Resurrection ePub

by Clifford A. Pickover

  • ISBN: 1560259841
  • Category: History and Philosophy
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Clifford A. Pickover
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (December 27, 2006)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1814 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1684 kb
  • Other: rtf txt mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 106

Description

After reading "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality" you may suspect that Cliff Pickover actually wants "the human mind to correlate all its contents. Which could be precisely what happens to the most intelligent human beings in the 21st Century anyway.

After reading "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality" you may suspect that Cliff Pickover actually wants "the human mind to correlate all its contents. If so, what he has to offer in this book should be of interest to the armchair existentialists.

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality is a celebration of unusual lives and creative thinkers who punched through . A Beginner's Guide to Immortality : Extraordinary People, Alien Brains, and Quantum Resurrection. by Clifford A. Pickover.

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality is a celebration of unusual lives and creative thinkers who punched through ordinary cultural norms while becoming successful i. .

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality highlights these unusual thinkers who punched through our ordinary cultural norms while becoming successful in their own niches. Here, we celebrate these extraordinary people and their curious ideas

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality highlights these unusual thinkers who punched through our ordinary cultural norms while becoming successful in their own niches. Here, we celebrate these extraordinary people and their curious ideas. Part memoir and part surrealistic perspective on culture, Pickover gives readers a glimpse of new ways of thinking and of other worlds as he reaches across cultures and peers beyond our ordinary reality.

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality book. In his latest and greatest work, world-renowned science writer Cliff Pickover studies such colofrul characters as Truman Capote, John Cage, Stephen Wolfram, Ray Kurzweil, and Wilhelm Rontgen, an A Beginner's Guide to Immortality is a celebration of unusual lives and creative thinkers who punched through ordinary cultural norms while becoming successful in their own niches.

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality is a celebration of unusual lives and creative thinkers who punched through ordinary cultural norms while becoming successful in their own niches. Stephen Wolfram, Ray Kurzweil, and Wilhelm Rontgen, and their curious ideas. Through these individuals, we can better explore life's astonishing richness and glimpse the diversity of human imagination.

Brains, and Quantum Resurrection. Some of Pickover's later books often discussed "science at the edges," including such topics as parallel universes, quantum immortality, alien life, and elf-like beings seen by some people who use dimethyltryptamine. History of science and mathematics. Starting in 2008, Pickover's books began to focus on the history of science and mathematics, with such titles as Archimedes to Hawking, as well as The Math Book, The Physics Book, and The Medical Book-a trilogy of more than 1,500 pages that presents various historical milestones, breakthroughs, and curiosities.

Books related to A Beginner's Guide to Immortality. In his latest and greatest work, world-renowned science writer Cliff Pickover studies such colofrul characters as Truman Capote, John Cage, Stephen Wolfram, Ray Kurzweil, and Wilhelm Rontgen, and their curious ideas. Part memoir and part surrealistic perspective on cultur. more)

Clifford A. Manufacturer: Basic Books Release date: 27 December 2006 ISBN-10 : 1560259841 ISBN-13: 9781560259848.

Clifford A. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

A Beginner's Guide to Immortality is a celebration of unusual lives and creative thinkers who punched through ordinary cultural norms while becoming successful in their own niches. In his latest and greatest work, world-renowned science writer Cliff Pickover studies such colofrul characters as Truman Capote, John Cage, Stephen Wolfram, Ray Kurzweil, and Wilhelm Rontgen, and their curious ideas. Through these individuals, we can better explore life's astonishing richness and glimpse the diversity of human imagination. Part memoir and part surrealistic perspective on culture, A Beginner's Guide to Immortality gives readers a glimpse of new ways of thinking and of other worlds as he reaches across cultures and peers beyond our ordinary reality. He illuminates some of the most mysterious phenomena affecting our species. What is creativity? What are the religious implications of mosquito evolution, simulated Matrix realities, the brain's own marijuana, and the mathematics of the apocalypse? Could we be a mere software simulation living in a matrix? Who is Elisabeth Kübler-Ross and Emanuel Swedenborg? Did church forefathers eat psychedelic snails? How can we safely expand our minds to become more successful and reason beyond the limits of our own intuition? How can we become immortal?

Comments

Spilberg Spilberg
First you have to realize that this book doesn't really address much about Immortality. It shouldn't even be on the same book shelf as Stephen Cave's "Immortality:The Quest to Live Forever and How it Drives Civilization." Second over 50 pages of the book are just various quotes. Clifford also references many of his other books essentially getting double use out of his writing. That said there's such a bricolage of diverse ideas in this book that there's something that will appeal to just about anyone. For example I found Clifford's discussion of evolution over intelligent design on pages 182-198 to be a nice and correct summation of the major issues.
Zolorn Zolorn
Another romp around a theme that might include amortality. The book is a collection of scientific thoughts on immortality and is heaping with great quotes to help get you thinking. Cliff suggested this book because I liked his Drugs, Sex, Einstein and Elves and it is almost as free flowing despite the gravity of the theme; it is an enjoyable read with many interesting tidbits and intriguing quotes sprinkled thoughout (especially those hidden at the end of the notes and references sections and one reference to spindle cells). In the "about the author" section, Cliff indicates that one of his next book topics will depend on reader response to a list: 1) Matrioshka Brains, 2) Carolingian Renaissance, 3) pareidolia and Marian apparitions, 4) Gram-schmidt orthonormalization, 5) Phyllodocida, 6) Turangalila, 7) factorion 40,585, 8) Egil Skallagrimsson, 9) aposiopesis and asyndeton in literature and life, 10) calipee, and 11) Olaf Sporns' connectome. I chose calipee. How about you?
Cells Cells
I just finished Pickover's book and like the way he bridges all sorts of different ideas, interspersed with great quotes form notables. For example, he weaves the lives of famous authors, Science Fiction Films, anthropologists, philosophers, scientists, mind altering drugs, mathematical equations into a fascinating and fun discovery of ideas and notions I never would have thought about. Particularly interesting are the strange, quirky and addictive habits and coincidences of highly creative people. As a non-academic, he made many topics easily accessible and a blast to read. I like the way he goes off on tangents, as they are always interesting. Any scientist who entertains notions of parallel universes, DMT ingestion, liver divination and intelligent design (to name a few) is OK in my book. Enjoy.
Vozilkree Vozilkree
In "Sex, Drugs, Einstein & Elves" Cliff Pickover revealed a side of his personality that was well-camouflaged in his first thirty some-odd books on mathematics, time travel, fractals, aliens, patterns, puzzles, God, etc. Indeed, writing so many books in such a short time may be the root cause of his now irrepressible eclecticism. This latest effort, "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality: Extraordinary People, Aliens Brains, and Quantum Resurrection," has many similarities to SDE&E. Not only is it written with an exuberance that complements the author's multi-dimensional perspective, the prose remains clear and accessible even as Pickover explores the complex reaches of transcendental reality.

One of the highlights of "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality" is Chapter 3, "Gilgamesh, God, and the Language of Angels." Pickover confesses that the "Epic of Gilgamesh" is one of his deepest obsessions. And we get a feel for his zeal as he recounts the ancient Mesopotamian king's search for immortality. But there is also a lot of extraneous material in this chapter. It's a virtual Mind Salad of eclecticism. Pickover's brain is fizzing with ideas and impressions, perhaps as a result of his relentless work ethic and voracious reading habits, and they seem to inundate his consciousness as he writes. I find this stimulating. Others may differ, wishing instead for a simpler, more direct narrative line.

At his best, Pickover's mind is encyclopedic -- correction: it's Wikipedic! It's Google-alien! Who else would focus on "The Brain from Planet Arous" in a chapter about Truman Capote? But Pickover does, and it can be fascinating because you get a completely different mental picture once you exit Truman Capote's peculiar oeuvre and enter the zany universe of Fifties science-fiction flicks, of which Pickover is a connoisseur. He loves the movies themselves, but also their filmmakers and the whole idea that some P.T. Barnum showman could make some outrageous, low-budget, horror-show hokum with B-list actors and still turn a tidy profit.

But Pickover can also be deadly serious, and I find this quote from "The Call of Cthulhu" by H.P. Lovecraft, (which also appears in Chapter 3) to be quite haunting:

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We lie on the placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of disassociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age."

After reading "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality" you may suspect that Cliff Pickover actually wants "the human mind to correlate all its contents." Which could be precisely what happens to the most intelligent human beings in the 21st Century anyway. If so, what he has to offer in this book should be of interest to the armchair existentialists. We all want to live forever. But then again, maybe not.
Qucid Qucid
Pickover knows just what to say to kickstart the parts of your brain you haven't even used yet. Reading this book is like taking a walking tour through the magical zone where your life and reality and history and b-movies intersect. Educational, hilarious, mind-blowing, engaging and full of zest and zing, Pickover punctuates his prose with trenchant quotes aplenty. The thing you learn quick when traveling in the Pickover realm is that your brain is always growing and learning, and there is no limit to how far we can go. This guy's also got a generous heart and spirit, you can feel it in the words he writes, and that sort of hawk-eyed optimism for a transcendental, trans-dimensional future is damned contagious. I read this book and I feel like whatever happens, the collective mass of DNA we call the world/self is gonna be not only fine but blazin'! Plus it's light (nice soft pages) and has cool purple cover, with a skull!
Faugami Faugami
Of the 40,000 books in my private library, this one is in the top 5 of my favorites. I constantly re-read it and always find something new each time. It hasn't left my nightstand since the day I received it 7 or 8 years ago. This book is a lot like Pickover's other book, Sex, Drugs, Einstein & Elves, which I just wrote a review of. That one is also in my top 5 of favorites. I treasure the information in these two books, they have led me in new directions and explore arcane subjects and areas I may never have stumbled upon if I had not read them. Bravo Professor Pickover, PLEASE write more books like this.