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eBook Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution (Science and Its Conceptual Foundations) ePub

eBook Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution (Science and Its Conceptual Foundations) ePub

by Peter Dear

  • ISBN: 0226139441
  • Category: History and Philosophy
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Peter Dear
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (November 25, 1995)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1478 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1431 kb
  • Other: mbr txt rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 410

Description

This book is marred by fundamental misunderstanding of what "the mathematical way" meant to the key figures of the 17th century

This book is marred by fundamental misunderstanding of what "the mathematical way" meant to the key figures of the 17th century. According to Dear: "Newton's work. premised on a constructivist conception of mathematical objects themselves. But since the manual arts are chiefly conversant in the moving of bodies, it comes to pass that Geometry is commonly referred to their magnitudes, and Mechanics to their motion. In this sense Rational Mechanics will be the science of motions resulting from any forces whatsoever. Again, then, geometry is that part of these sciences that measures only, not constructs.

Discipline and Experience book Peter Dear investigates the nature of the change that occurred during this period, focusing particular attention on evolving notions o. .

Discipline and Experience book. Although the Scientific Revolution has long been regarded. Start by marking Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Peter Dear investigates the nature of the change that occurred during this period, focusing particular attention on evolving notions of experience and how these developed into the experimental work that is at the center of modern science.

Similar books and articles. Scientific Knowledge and the Metaphysics of Experience The Debate in Early Modern Aristotelianism. All rights reserved by The PhilPapers Foundation. Page generated Mon Oct 21 19:12:29 2019 on pp1. Peter Dear, Discipline & experience : The mathematical way in the scientific revolution. 1998 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 51 (2-3):382-383. Stefan Heßbrüggen-Walter - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (2):134-156. The Ptolemy-Copernicus Transition.

Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution. Science and Its Conceptual Foundations. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Science and its conceptual foundations. 0226139433, 0226139441. HI296: Scientific Revolution in Perspective

Science and its conceptual foundations. HI296: Scientific Revolution in Perspective Previous: Boyle: between God and science. Library availability.

Scientific Revolution, drastic change in scientific thought that took place during . Thus, it was widely read by mathematical astronomers, in spite of its central cosmological hypothesis, which was widely ignored.

Scientific Revolution, drastic change in scientific thought that took place during the 16th and 17th centuries. Scientific societies sprang up, beginning in Italy in the early years of the 17th century and culminating in the two great national scientific societies that mark the zenith of the Scientific Revolution: the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, created by royal charter in 1662, and the Académie des Sciences of Paris, formed in 1666.

Электронная книга "Scientific Practices in European History, 1200-1800: A Book of Texts", Peter Dear. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Scientific Practices in European History, 1200-1800: A Book of Texts" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Scientific Revolution was a series of events that marked the emergence of modern science during the early modern period, when developments in mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology (including human anatomy) and chemistry transformed the views .

The Scientific Revolution was a series of events that marked the emergence of modern science during the early modern period, when developments in mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology (including human anatomy) and chemistry transformed the views of society about nature. The Scientific Revolution took place in Europe towards the end of the Renaissance period and continued through the late 18th century, influencing the intellectual social movement known as the Enlightenment

3 Peter Dear (1995), Discipline & Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution (Chi .

3 Peter Dear (1995), Discipline & Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution (Chi .14In her 2004 book, The Body of the Artisan: Art and Experience in the Scientific Revolution, Pamela Smith argues that ‘the methods, goals, and episteme of art’ are ‘central to an understanding of the Scientific Revolution. 13 In particular, she emphasises the crucial contribution of an ‘artisanal epistemology’ to the emergence of early-modern science.

Higher superstition: The academic left and its quarrels with science. In Rationality of science: Studies in the foundations of science and ethics, ed. Risto Hilpinen, 91–110. Dordrecht: D. Reidel. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Douglas, Heather E. 2009. Higher superstition: The academic left and its quarrels with science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Although the Scientific Revolution has long been regarded as the beginning of modern science, there has been little consensus about its true character. While the application of mathematics to the study of the natural world has always been recognized as an important factor, the role of experiment has been less clearly understood. Peter Dear investigates the nature of the change that occurred during this period, focusing particular attention on evolving notions of experience and how these developed into the experimental work that is at the center of modern science. He examines seventeenth-century mathematical sciences—astronomy, optics, and mechanics—not as abstract ideas, but as vital enterprises that involved practices related to both experience and experiment. Dear illuminates how mathematicians and natural philosophers of the period—Mersenne, Descartes, Pascal, Barrow, Newton, Boyle, and the Jesuits—used experience in their argumentation, and how and why these approaches changed over the course of a century. Drawing on mathematical texts and works of natural philosophy from all over Europe, he describes a process of change that was gradual, halting, sometimes contradictory—far from the sharp break with intellectual tradition implied by the term "revolution."