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eBook Speedsolving the Cube: Easy-to-Follow, Step-by-Step Instructions for Many Popular 3-D Puzzles ePub

eBook Speedsolving the Cube: Easy-to-Follow, Step-by-Step Instructions for Many Popular 3-D Puzzles ePub

by Robert Steimle,Dan Harris

  • ISBN: 1402753136
  • Category: Mathematics
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Robert Steimle,Dan Harris
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sterling (May 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 176
  • ePub book: 1874 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1581 kb
  • Other: mobi lit txt azw
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 321

Description

This is a great cubing book. You need 2 hands to work the cube and at least 1 to hold the book open. The book is small - like a paperback, so you constantly have to find a way to keep it propped open

This is a great cubing book. I have purchased it twice because I carried the first one around so much that it started falling apart. I am confident the second one will suffer the same fate as the first; I have only learned 38 of the 57 OLL algorithms for the 3X3X3, and 7 of the 21 PLL algorithms. I still have a lot to learn. The book is small - like a paperback, so you constantly have to find a way to keep it propped open.

Speedsolving the Cube book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Speedsolving the Cube book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Speedsolving the Cube: Easy-to-Follow, Step-by-Step Instructions for Many Popular 3-D Puzzles as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

How to Solve the Rubik’s Cube: An Easy Tutorial - Продолжительность: 37:39 TheCubicle . U&U puzzle by Hanayama. Страна: США. Безопасный режим: выкл.

How to Solve the Rubik’s Cube: An Easy Tutorial - Продолжительность: 37:39 TheCubicle Recommended for you. 37:39. Сделал КУБИК РУБИКА ДЛЯ СЛЕПЫХ с помощью 3D ручки - Продолжительность: 12:31 Евгений Бондаренко³ Recommended for you. 12:31. How to screw the puzzle - Продолжительность: 9:34 Puzzle guy Recommended for you. 9:34. 4 killer serves to destroy your opponents (with Craig Bryant) - Продолжительность: 11:38 Tom Lodziak Recommended for you. 11:38.

Speedsolving the Cube : Easy-to-Follow, Step-by-Step Instructions for Many Popular 3-D Puzzles. I learned how to solve the Rubik's cube from a YouTube video by Dan Brown. I think his YouTube user name is Pogobot. Select Format: Paperback.

For many of us, simply being able to solve Rubik's Cube is not rewarding enough. Solving it as fast as possible is the exciting part! They call it "speedcubing"-a mind-bending blur of quick twists and turns that solves Rubik's Cube in times that have been clocked at less than 20 seconds. Today, thanks to the 2003 revival of the Rubik's World Championships, speedcubing is spreading like wildfire. Here, complete with detailed illustrations and basic as well as advanced solving techniques, is the ultimate speedcuber's guide.

item 2 Speed Solving the Cube Easy to Follow Step by step Instructions for Many Popular -Speed Solving the Cube Easy to. .Easy to follow could do the cube when younger now need a book at 60 to do it keeps my mind active. Verified purchase: Yes Condition: Pre-owned

item 2 Speed Solving the Cube Easy to Follow Step by step Instructions for Many Popular -Speed Solving the Cube Easy to Follow Step by step Instructions for Many Popular. item 3 Speed Solving the Cube: Easy to Follow, Step-by-step Instructions for Many Pop, -Speed Solving the Cube: Easy to Follow, Step-by-step Instructions for Many Pop, £. 8. Last oneFree postage. Verified purchase: Yes Condition: Pre-owned. by pro-am196703 Mar, 2014.

Dan Harris, Robert Steimle. They call it 'speedcubing'- and mind-bending blur of quick twists and turns that solves Rubik's Cube in times that have been clocked at less than 20 seconds!

Dan Harris, Robert Steimle. They call it 'speedcubing'- and mind-bending blur of quick twists and turns that solves Rubik's Cube in times that have been clocked at less than 20 seconds! Today, thanks to the 2003 revival of the Rubik's World Championships, speedcubing is spreading like wildfire. Here, complete with detailed illustrations and basic as well as advanced solving techniques, is the ultimate speedcuber's guide

Mastering Rubik's Cube: The Solution to the 20th Century's Most Amazing Puzzle by Don Taylor and Andrena Millen.

Mastering Rubik's Cube: The Solution to the 20th Century's Most Amazing Puzzle by Don Taylor and Andrena Millen. Crack it! The Rubik's Cube Solution by Karen Peebles. Unlocking the Rubik's Cube by Neil Shah. Speedsolving the Cube: Easy-to-Follow, Step-by-Step Instructions for Many Popular 3-D Puzzles by Dan Harris and Robert Steimle. Source(s): Anonymous · 1 decade ago.

Cube Puzzle Step By Step Instructions Puzzles 3 D Puzzle. This listing is for a signed physical copy of the book by the illustrator, Wendy Piersall (that's me!). com: The Cube: Turns Quicker and More Precisely Than Original; Super-durable With Vivid Colors; Best-selling 3x3 Cube; Easy Turning and Smooth Play: Toys & Games. Vivid Colors Turning Wood Turning Lathe.

This is a great cubing book. I don't see why a beginner should have problems understanding the "layer by layer method" described in this book.

Super Strategies for Speedcubers!

For many of us, simply being able to solve Rubik’s Cube is not rewarding enough. Solving it as fast as possible is the exciting part! They call it “speedcubing”—a mind-bending blur of quick twists and turns that solves Rubik’s Cube in times that have been clocked at less than 20 seconds.  Today, thanks to the 2003 revival of the Rubik’s World Championships, speedcubing is spreading like wildfire. Here, complete with detailed illustrations and basic as well as advanced solving techniques, is the ultimate speedcuber’s guide. It not only gives the solution to the familiar 3x3x3 cube (which has 43,252,003,274,489,856,000—that’s 43 quintillion—possible positions), but also the 2x2x2, 4x4x4, and staggeringly difficult 5x5x5 puzzles. With millions of cubes out there and countless would-be champions looking for tips to improve their times, this is the definitive manual for this unique sport.

Comments

JoJosho JoJosho
This book is a decent travel companion or for times when you aren't near a computer. Watching videos will likely teach more people more quickly, but I knew this and still purchased the book. I've only worked with the 2x and 3x cubes so far and it's been a useful reference.

The book is probably most appropriate for people moving from beginner to intermediate. Though you could certainly learn from the ground up here, I found online references (You CAN do the cube dot com) more than sufficient to learn the beginner's method where the tight binding of this little book is not fighting you physically why trying to wrap your head around your first solves. I also have benefited more from watching specific UTube video collections than from the book (badmephisto and crazybadcuber come to mind) but even still, I'm happy to have something that isn't a video device.

Quite simply - this is just a supplement to all the videos I watch. It's a little dated. It's little in size. It's okay and very inexpensive.

If you're finding that the algorithms are incorrect on the 2x2x2 or the 3x3x3 odds are you're making an error with the notation. My favorite mistake when I'm tired is to start applying B's to the bottom instead of the back. Remember, D for Down, B for back! That said, there are some known errors, primarily concentrated in the 5x5x5 section. I'm including the complete list of corrections from the original errata page for your reference. I took a fine Sharpie and applied all the corrections in one pass.

ERRATA:
A full set of corrections - From the Way Back Machine, as the original site is now gone:

Page 12 - Table 3.4 Move Notation Scheme - Cube Rotations

In the book: "...z2 means rotate the cube 180 clockwise so that the U-face becomes the D-face, and the R-face stays the same."
Correction: "...z2 means rotate the cube 180 clockwise so that the U-face becomes the D-face, and the F-face stays the same."

Simple oversight.

* * *

Page 31 - Table 4.5b Adjacent Edge Swap Algorithm

In the book: R U2 R' U' R U' R' 1 U2 1 R U R' U R U2 R'
Correction: R U2 R' U' R U' R' + U2 + R U R' U R U2 R'

The 1's should be replaced with + signs to indicate that the algorithm comes in three parts. First you do the Permute Edges Clockwise algorithm, then a U2, and finally the Permute Edges Counter Cockwise algorithms.

* * *

Page 36 - Table 4.8 Swap Adjacent Corners Algorithm

In the book: R' F9 L' F R F' L F R' F' L F R F' L' F
Correction: R' F' L' F R F' L F R' F' L F R F' L' F

F9 should be written as F'

* * *

Page 43 - Table 5.1

In the book: 0.00005
Correction: 0.0005

The % of total cross cases that can be solved in 0 moves is 0.0005, or 5*10^-4.

* * *

Page 56 - Tables 5.8 and 5.9

The table titles have been switched by mistake. Where it says "Counterclockwise" in the title of Table 5.8 read Clockwise, and vice-versa in Table 5.9

* * *

Page 125 - Table 8.3 Both Algorithms

In the book: Corner-Center at Front: (R r) U (R' r') U (R r) (U2 u2) (R' r') (R r)
Correction: Corner-Center at Front: (R r) U (R' r') U (R r) U2 (R' r')

In the book: Corner-Center on Bottom: (R2 r2) U (R2 r2) U (R2 r2) (U2 u2) (R2 r2)
Correction: Corner-Center on Bottom: (R2 r2) U (R2 r2) U (R2 r2) U2 (R2 r2)

Both algorithms are written slightly wrong, please study the corrections carefully to see how they should be written.

* * *

Page 126 - Table 8.4 Wing Edge in bottom layer, on the left.

In the book: Move: D F D' (D' d')
Correction: Move: D F D' F' (D' d')

An F' has been omitted in printing.

* * *

Page 127 - Table 8.5 Both Algorithms for Centre-Edge piece in the bottom layer, and Right-hand diagram

In the book: Colours on Front Face are Nonmatching: R' F' U F (U' u') (D d)
Correction: Colours on Front Face are Nonmatching: D F D' F' (U' u') (D d)

In the book: Colours on Front Face are Matching: R U' R (U' u') (D d)
Correction: Colours on Front Face are Matching: R' D R (U' u') (D d). Please note the Orange sticker on the D slice should be on the Center-Edge NOT the WIng-Edge

Some typing errors, please study corrections carefully.

* * *

Page 132 - Missing Sentence at end of page

In the book: "If you don't know how to solve the 3x3x3, "
Correction: "If you don't know how to solve the 3x3x3, please see the beginner method described in chapter 4 for guidance"

Printing error.

* * *

Page 151 - Second algorithm from top (Cube in cube in cube pattern)

In the book: U' L' U' F' R2 B' R F U B2 U B' L U' F U R F
Correction: U' L' U' F' R2 B' R F U B2 U B' L U' F U R F'

Final move should be F' not F.
Ishnjurus Ishnjurus
This is a great cubing book. I have purchased it twice because I carried the first one around so much that it started falling apart. I am confident the second one will suffer the same fate as the first; I have only learned 38 of the 57 OLL algorithms for the 3X3X3, and 7 of the 21 PLL algorithms. I still have a lot to learn.

I don't see why a beginner should have problems understanding the "layer by layer method" described in this book. The beginner's method I learned was different, but I decided to study and understand this method after reading about it in this book. Now when someone asks me to explain how to solve a 3X3X3 cube, this is the method I refer to, because the book is a readily available, easy to understand resource. The author does a good job of explaining the necessary algorithms, as well as optional algorithms for more specific cases if the reader wants to be faster.

For 3X3X3 cubes, the author offers the following:

- a beginner's method, or, a layer-by-layer method
- CFOP: Cross, F2L, OLL, PLL
- Expert speedcubing techniques including advice about finger tricks and F2L, and VHF2L.

The author also provides 3X3X3 reduction methods for both the 4X4X4 and 5X5X5 cubes.

You can certainly learn as much from YouTube videos and online resources, but the book is to me, more convenient. I take notes in the margins of my book, which makes it obvious which algorithms I have learned and which ones I am working on. It fits nicely into one of the back pockets of my jeans so it is easy to take with me. I travel for work, and this book has been with me to Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Delhi, as well as various places around the US.

Being a software developer, I wonder whether a mobile application might be a good companion to the book. ;)

The author is encouraging, and offers helpful suggestions about how to go about learning and improving. He peppers the pages with just the right amount of interesting facts, or tidbits of information about cubing to make it more interesting.

I spend most of my time in the OLL & PLL algorithms. I like how the author has grouped the algorithms. The first 7 OLL algorithms are the essential algorithms you must know in order to solve after completing the top cross. After that, algorithms are grouped into sections of related algorithms. In most cases so far, I have been able to practice one entire section at a time rather than just learn one single algorithm at a time.

There is a natural progression when learning these OLL & PLL algorithms:

- Become familiar with the algorithm; get to know the algorithm by muscle memory. All OLL & PLL algorithms, if performed enough times, will return the cube to the solved state, so you only need to perform the algorithm repeatedly. Once I can get to the point where I am able to perform the algorithm without referring to the book, I try to do so with my eyes closed.
- Recognize how to distinguish the algorithm from other, related cases. There are often 2, 4, or 6 similar OLL "shapes" you must be able to recognize. I often create a kind of "story" in my mind that helps me to recognize which case, and how to orient the top face for the algorithm. For example, cases 20 & 21 look to me like "paddles" that get "pushed back/down" to start the algorithm. I know that there should be two connected cubelets with the top color on the front face, and they get "split apart" when I begin the algorithm by pushing the "paddles" back/down. It is difficult to explain, but all this becomes a kind of "scene" in my head that I think about when I see these cases.
- "Polish" the algorithm by practicing it repeatedly hundreds, if not thousands of times, trying various hand positions or finger placements to speed it up or make it flow better. I know I am doing well when I can perform an algorithm nearly quietly, with minimal clicking and catching of corners.
- Perfect the transition into and out of the algorithm. I tend to practice by implementing each algorithm from the solved state, and then proceed from whatever state the cube is now in, with the appropriate OLL & PLL algorithms to return it to a solved state. It reminds me of Katas in Karate; it also looks good when people watch you practice. :) I have become extremely fast at various combinations of algorithms, which I think helps to be able to flow from one algorithm to the next. Each time I learn a new algorithm, I have, effectively, a new "kata" to practice as long as I know the OLL algorithm needed.

Speedcubing is a great hobby. Like so many things in life, there are always ways to improve, and a huge community of people who love to talk about it. In my opinion, you will not go wrong with this book.
Marr Marr
This book really helped me to understand the cube. It is the best learning tool I have found (paired with the cubing app for iphone made by badmephisto of course)!

When I first got into the cube this helped me get under 60 second solve times within a couple of months of casual solving. If you memorize all of the algorithms presented in the book sub 20 second solve times are a reality, but I have yet to dedicate that much time to this hobby. I have since bought this book at least 3 times, and given it to friends who expressed interest in puzzle cubes.

Bottom line, whether you are just getting into rubik's cube, or are an experienced speed solver, this book is an essential reference that will always live on my bookshelf. (that is of course until I gift it to someone and have to order another one.