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eBook Heaven's Fractal Net: Retrieving Lost Visions in the Humanities ePub

eBook Heaven's Fractal Net: Retrieving Lost Visions in the Humanities ePub

by William J. Jackson

  • ISBN: 0253342791
  • Category: Mathematics
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: William J. Jackson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press; Har/DVD edition (March 26, 2004)
  • Pages: 328
  • ePub book: 1940 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1186 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 752

Description

According to William J. Jackson, the more one studies fractals, the more apparent their connections to the humanities become.

According to William J. In the recursive patterns of religious music, in temple architecture in India, in cathedral structures in Europe and America, in the imagery of religious literature depicting infinity and abundance, and in poetic descriptions of the nature of consciousness, fractal-like configurations are pervasive

Heaven's Fractal Net book.

Heaven's Fractal Net book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Heaven's Fractal Net: Retrieving Lost Visions in the Humanities as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

William Jackson takes us across cultures to explore the mysteries of the infinite. Jackson moves from fractals as symbols to fractals as lived experience

William Jackson takes us across cultures to explore the mysteries of the infinite. Jackson moves from fractals as symbols to fractals as lived experience. The repeating pattern, the sense of infinity; there is certainly something to awe. And it seems that we humans have had a sense of it for some time.

Fractal concepts are part of our emerging vocabulary and can be useful in identifying patterns of human behavior, culture, and history, while enhancing our understanding of the nature of consciousness.

G. JAMARIE:, Maximum Entropy, Information Without Probability and Complex Fractals, Classical an. .

JACKSON, Heaven’s Fractal Net: Retrieving Lost Visions in the Humanities, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2004. R. JULLIEN & R. BOTTET, Aggregation and Fractal Aggregation, Singapore: World Scientific, 1987.

Jackson, William Joseph (2004). Heaven's Fractal Net: Retrieving Lost Visions in the Humanities. Adam, J. A. Mathematics in Nature: Modeling Patterns in the Natural World. Indiana University Press. p. 2. ^ Resnik, Michael D. (November 1981). Resnik, M. D. Mathematics as a Science of Patterns.

Heaven's Fractal Net. Retrieving Lost Visions in the Humanities. by William J. Jackson. Published February 2004 by Indiana University Press. In the recursive patterns of religious music, in temple architecture in India, in cathedral structures in Europe and America, in the imagery of religious literature depicting infinity and abundance, and in poetic descriptions of the nature of consciousness, fractal-like configurations are pervasive

Find nearly any book by William J Jackson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Find nearly any book by William J Jackson.

CRC Press 2008 Heaven's fractal net : retrieving lost visions in the Indiana 6 humanities, William J. Giroux The law of success in sixteen lessons : teaching, Wilshire for the first time in the history of the world, the Book Co. 20 2000 true philosophy upon which all personal success is built, by Napoleon Hill. The law of success in sixteen lessons : teaching, Wilshire for the first time in the history of the world, the Book Co. 21 2000 true philosophy upon which all personal success is built, by Napoleon Hill.

"Fractal" is a term coined by mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot to denote the geometry of nature, which traces inherent order in chaotic shapes and processes. Fractal concepts are part of our emerging vocabulary and can be useful in identifying patterns of human behavior, culture, and history, while enhancing our understanding of the nature of consciousness.

According to William J. Jackson, the more one studies fractals, the more apparent their connections to the humanities become. In the recursive patterns of religious music, in temple architecture in India, in cathedral structures in Europe and America, in the imagery of religious literature depicting infinity and abundance, and in poetic descriptions of the nature of consciousness, fractal-like configurations are pervasive. Recognition of this structure, which is also found in social organizations and ritual symbolism, requires only that one develop "an eye for fractals" by studying the work of researchers and observing nature. One then begins to see that the separation of humanities and science is convenient oversimplification, not an ultimate fact. Includes a DVD of animated fractals.

Comments

Forcestalker Forcestalker
I bought this book as a Christmas gift for my boyfriend. He has really enjoyed the information contained in this book. If you enjoy exploring fractals, this will be an enjoyable read.
Watikalate Watikalate
Before reading this book, fractals conjured in my mind, those trippy psychedelic posters. But Fractals are certainly a trippy subject, and the implications are beyond pop culture and trippy posters. Fractals reflect the ever unfolding but infinite patterns of universe and nature. This book explores how humanity has intuited the repetitive order of the universe.

William Jackson takes us across cultures to explore the mysteries of the infinite. Jackson moves from fractals as symbols to fractals as lived experience. There is a sense that fractals as images are only reflective of existence and experience...The repeating pattern, the sense of infinity; there is certainly something to awe. And it seems that we humans have had a sense of it for some time. Jackson illustrates this point with an examination of poetry-- Dante, Tennyson, and Dickinson all weighing in. Then there are the echoes of mathematicians, biologists, psychologists, philosophers, and mystics. The human psyche, culture, and personality all reveal the fractal condition. What other mysteries does fractal geometry reveal?

Look into the mirror and there is the universe