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eBook Among the Clouds: Work, Wit  Wild Weather at the Mount Washington Observatory ePub

eBook Among the Clouds: Work, Wit Wild Weather at the Mount Washington Observatory ePub

by Eric Pinder

  • ISBN: 0615204597
  • Category: Nature and Ecology
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Eric Pinder
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Alpine Books (April 14, 2008)
  • Pages: 112
  • ePub book: 1648 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1842 kb
  • Other: azw lrf doc rtf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 369

Description

Among the Clouds: Work, . .has been added to your Cart. Eric Pinder is a gifted, engaging writer, and this is a fun, if short, book centering on 10 years spent manning the weather station atop Mt Washington.

Among the Clouds: Work, . I love meteorology, but you dont have to be a weather buff to find this book interesting. Gives some insight as to the forecasting process and why it is so hard. I will highly recommend another book by Pinder, Tying Down the Wind, for those who really want to understand weather systems on our fascinating planet.

Among the Clouds book. This is another great book by Eric Pinder revealing the workings of the Mount Washington Observatory and the World’s Worst Weather! Eric has a great story telling ability making you feel welcome on the 6,288-foot summit. I particularly liked the last chapter detailing the day in the life of an observatory meteorologist. As the book’s title states, there is work, wit & wild weathe. mong the clouds!

Work, Wit & Wild Weather at the Mount Washington Observatory. Foreword by meteorologist Mish Michaels. 100 pages, B&W illustrations, Alpine Books, 2008.

Work, Wit & Wild Weather at the Mount Washington Observatory. A bored raven steals food from foxes and goes tobogganing on the snow. A mountaintop meteorologist commutes home by sled after enduring a week of nonstop hurricane-force winds.

Among the Clouds : Work, Wit and Wild Weather at the Mount Washington Observatory. Where can you build a snowman in June, commute by sled, and witness hurricane-force winds twelve months out of the year? The answer is only at the 6288-foot-high Mount Washington Observatory, perched amongst the clouds in New Hampshire's White Mountains. A record-breaking 231-mph gust of wind shrieked across the summit in 1934, earning the mountain its nickname: Home of the World's Worst Weather.

Where can you find the worst weather on earth? The surprising answer in Tying .

Where can you find the worst weather on earth? The surprising answer in Tying Down the Wind is: everywhere! You don’t need to climb Mount Everest or voyage to the icy desert of Antarctica to witness both the beauty and the destructiveness of weather. Drawing on the author’s experiences at the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, Tying Down the Wind revisits the devastating Northeast Ice Storm of 1998, takes readers on a snow-blind walk through a Berkshire blizzard, and describes the impact of a 54,000-degree lightning bolt just a few yards away.

Among the Clouds: Work, Wit & Wild Weather at the Mount .

Wempe Magazine Impressions 2015 - 2016. ESSENTIALS of ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY Jerry Service 1937 Astronomical Observations.

The answer is only at the 6288-foot-high Mount Washington Observatory, perched amongst the clouds in New Hampshire's White Mountains. A record-breaking 231-mph gust of wind shrieked across the summit in 1934, earning the mountain its nickname: "Home of the World's Worst Weather. A few hardy souls live at the Observatory year-round, enduring savage thunderstorms, twenty-foot snowdrifts, blinding fog, and odd questions from visitors ("Can you see New Hampshire from here?"). Discover what a meteorologist's typical day is like in the harsh but spectacular world.

Hiking Katahdin and the Appalachian Trail, experiencing wild weather at the Mount Washington Observatory and other outdoor adventures from nature writer Eric Pinder. category: Sport Mountaineering. There are no posts for this page.

Eric Pinder worked at the Mount Washington Observatory for seven years, performing weather observations for the . Eric graduated from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

Eric Pinder worked at the Mount Washington Observatory for seven years, performing weather observations for the National Weather Service. He teaches at Chester College of New England, and currently is pursuing an MFA program at Vermont College of Fine Arts, focusing on writing for children and young adults. Walsh has illustrated four other books in addition to Cat in the Clouds.

There are legends, historic records, and even books about these phenomena, (including "AMONG THE CLOUDS: Work, Wit & Wild Weather at the Mount Washington Observatory" by Eric Pinder). According to records, on the afternoon of April 12, 1934, technicians at the summit weather station (which is actually chained to the mountain's surface) recorded a wind speed of 231 MPH (372 kph) ! Date the Record Happened: April 12, 1934 Where did this record happen: At the Mount Washington summit weather o.

Where can you build a snowman in June, commute by sled, and witness hurricane-force winds twelve months out of the year? The answer is only at the 6288-foot-high Mount Washington Observatory, perched amongst the clouds in New Hampshire's White Mountains. A record-breaking 231-mph gust of wind shrieked across the summit in 1934, earning the mountain its nickname: "Home of the World's Worst Weather." A few hardy souls live at the Observatory year-round, enduring savage thunderstorms, twenty-foot snowdrifts, blinding fog, and odd questions from visitors ("Can you see New Hampshire from here?"). Discover what a meteorologist's typical day is like in the harsh but spectacular world above timberline. Come meet Nin the Cat, Marty on the Mountain, tobogganing ravens, hapless hikers, and meandering moose. These humorous and informative stories about life on a mountaintop are sure to appeal to hikers and weather aficionados alike. Foreword by meteorologist Mish Michaels.

Comments

Blackbeard Blackbeard
Mr. Pinder’s volume is a slim, easy to read, human touched book with a strange depth. Better known for his children’s books, this is the foundation place for the Northern New Hampshire resident. He is a scientist, somewhat isolated (but not really) on the top of a mountain that challenges even the existential. I know personally about this because in 1994 I spent some of the most challenging days of my life following an old logging trail, becoming hopelessly lost, setting up camp in a sheltered ravine, writing in my small book for several days, then attempting and succeeding in self-extraction. Mr. Pinder’s book strikes home like a homily about a subject you are wrestling with.

Eric tells us in crisp fashion about the body count of people who lost their lives on the mountain, about the tourist who comes and goes from his life like an animated set piece, and about his job, but he does not go deep on anything. Instead he has given us his thoughts of the day taken from his diary and shows us around his mind. A science nerd who loves the stars. Some of his observations are delightful, at one point his flashlight is a light saber. At another point the ravens are flying monkeys from the Wizard of Oz.

The biggest reason to read the book is a little fun. You won’t get proselytizing narrative telling you how environmental the author is and how we all are lesser beings. You won’t get endless statistics on the top of this 6000 plus foot-tall mountain. Instead you get easy reading, nice humor, a book that fits in a backpack, and interesting stories.

Now the critique. I wished the booked was longer. At 100 pages it wets the appetite and leaves you wishing for more. Second, I wish it had photographs. Mr. Pinder has published and shown amazing photography in the past, and I wonder at the store of these images that could have been applied to the book. It would have to change format, which is likely why the work stays a narrative non-fiction.

Still, I read the book and remembered the days I spent lost on the mountain freezing my cojones off and thought I could well be one of those hikers he met, had I been idiot enough to try for the summit on that trip. It brought back fond memories of cooking under mylar sheets in pelting wind, protected by
Vital Beast Vital Beast
I have read other books about Mt Washington by this author and honestly had forgotten how quirky he is. Loved this book and it was neat to read about "days in the life" of folks who live on the summit with the "world's worst weather." The only heads up I might make to a potential buyer is that the author seems to have penned this book as though he were writing to folks he knows, folks within his inner circle, and at times during reading I felt like I was missing an inside joke or something and it wasn't clear exactly what the author was talking about or what he was intending to do with his prose. It's still a nice read though if you're into anything and all things Mount Washington/White Mountains, NH.
Unde Unde
I bought this while on a recent trip to New Hampshire and was in the mood for something relating to the White Mountain region. It was a fast, fun read. I generally read very slowly but I finished this one in about a week. It's a very interesting look at the day to day job of a Mt Washington weather researcher. I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to anyone interested in the Mt Washington Observatory. I plan on checking out more of Eric Pinder's work.
Gaiauaco Gaiauaco
Only disappointing thing About the book was how quickly it was over (just barely 100 pages) but still well worth the 3.95 for the kindle version. Interesting perspective on Mt. Washington observatory and educational meteorological tidbits with the author's witty literal humor thrown in for good measure. I look forward to reading some of his other books.
Arihelm Arihelm
The summit of the White Mountains in New Hampshire is the highest point in New England at 6,288 feet. On it is the Mount Washington Observatory-one of the last man-run weather outposts. This summit is also known as the home of the "world's worst weather," mostly because hurricane force winds batter this peak more than 105 days a year.

The author, Eric Pinder, is writing about that what he knows. He spent seven years as an observer on Mount Washington. While everyone talks about the weather, it is obvious from his writing that he loves weather and finds unexpected humor and joy in its extremes and variances.

Among the Clouds gives a detailed account of the daily life on Mount Washington as a weather recorder as well as some humorous anecdotes that have happened to staff persons and visitors. Aside from a resident cat that lives at the Observatory year round, you might think life would be lonely and isolated, but apparently there is a continuous flow of hikers, tourists, media persons and researchers-and it is the staff who must see to the needs and safety of these people as well as act as tour guides, rescuers and medics when neede-while continuously monitoring the weather equipment and sending out weather reports.

Pinder sprinkles in lots of weather humor and trivia-why meteorologists use the word `front' when talking about air masses, the temperature in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776, and Ben Franklin's invention of the odometer. Almost every other page has a photo. The disappointment is that the photos are not in color but they are still awesome.

This short (97 pages), easily read book would be enjoyed by young readers as well as adults and would make a great holiday gift for most anyone. It is not only witty, it is also educational.

Pinder's really interesting web site should also be visited. He also gives the web site for the Mount Washington Observatory - [...] - which has more information about the weather station, current weather conditions there and educational projects available.

Armchair Interviews says: Ideal for someone who likes to read about unusual jobs-and also about weather-but will be enjoyed by all.