cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Analytical Mechanics
eBook Analytical Mechanics ePub

eBook Analytical Mechanics ePub

by Janet D. Finch,Louis N. Hand

  • ISBN: 0521573270
  • Category: Physics
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Janet D. Finch,Louis N. Hand
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (November 13, 1998)
  • Pages: 592
  • ePub book: 1194 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1525 kb
  • Other: azw lit txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 673

Description

Louis N. Hand, Janet D. Finch. This introductory undergraduate text provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical techniques of classical mechanics, one of the cornerstones of physics.

Louis N. It deals with all the important subjects encountered in an undergraduate course and thoroughly prepares the reader for further study at graduate level. The authors set out the fundamentals of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics early in the book and go on to cover such topics as linear oscillators, planetary orbits, rigid-body motion, small vibrations, nonlinear dynamics, chaos, and special relativity.

ANALYTICAL MCHANICS Analytical Mechanics provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical .

ANALYTICAL MCHANICS Analytical Mechanics provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical techniques of classical mechanics, one of the cornerstones of physics. It deals with all the important subjects cncoumcrcd in an undergraduate course and prepares the reader thoroughly for further study at the graduate level. Janet D. Finch, teaching associate in the Physics Department of Cornell University, earned her BS in engineering lahysacs from the University of Illinois, and her MS in theoretical physics and her MA in teaching from Com�t{. In 1994 she began working with Proreset Hand on the Classical Mechanics course from which this book deveIoped. HAND and JANET D. Cambridge V university press. HHD BY THE PRESS SYNDICATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMB. RIDGE The Pitt Building. p. em. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0 521 57327 0 hardback ISBN 0 521 57572 9 paperback I. Mechanics, Analytic. 01'5 1 5352-dc2 I 97-43334 CIP.

Author: Louis N. Hand Janet D.

Analytical Mechanics provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical techniques of classical mechanics, one of the cornerstones of physics

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Analytical Mechanics. Analytical Mechanics provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical techniques of classical mechanics, one of the cornerstones of physics. It deals with all the important subjects encountered in an undergraduate course and prepares the reader thoroughly for further study at graduate level.

ANALYTICAL MECHANICS LOUIS N. . finch cambridge university press.

More by Janet D. A Degree of Choice (Pelican . Analytical Mechanics, first published in 1999, provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical techniques of classical mechanics, one of the cornerstones of physics. Hand, Cornell University, New York, Janet D. Finch, Cornell University, New York. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Online publication date: June 2012.

This introductory undergraduate text provides a detailed introduction to the key analytical techniques of classical mechanics, one of the cornerstones of physics. It deals with all the important subjects encountered in an undergraduate course and thoroughly prepares the reader for further study at graduate level. The authors set out the fundamentals of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics early in the book and go on to cover such topics as linear oscillators, planetary orbits, rigid-body motion, small vibrations, nonlinear dynamics, chaos, and special relativity. A special feature is the inclusion of many "e-mail questions," which are intended to facilitate dialogue between the student and instructor. It includes many worked examples, and there are 250 homework exercises to help students gain confidence and proficiency in problem-solving. It is an ideal textbook for undergraduate courses in classical mechanics, and provides a sound foundation for graduate study.

Comments

Kigabar Kigabar
As the authors point out in their preface, this book was developed as part of a classroom course - one where students would have ongoing email discussions with one another and with a teaching assistant throughout the course. As a result, many important ideas are presented in the form of "email questions", which the book leaves unanswered. Students are supposed to think about them on their own, then verify their answers by emailing the TA. Similarly, none of the chapter exercises have any answers, nor is there a student answer guide available.

While this is an interesting pedagogical approach, it severely limits the value of this book as a general physics text. In fact, outside the exact instructor-based class format used by the authors, the book is relatively useless.

As alternatives, I'd recommend Fowles & Cassiday (at the easy end of the spectrum), or for the more ambitious, just jump into Goldstein. Either of those volumes, plus a good problem book, will teach you far more physics than Hand & Free.
Tygokasa Tygokasa
awesome book
Hugighma Hugighma
When I get this book, I find it is exactly what I want. Every page is fine and it is worth the money.
Modifyn Modifyn
i think it's about i was searching for and too necessary, so as important, thanks for you inside view. gerard
Dainris Dainris
There are numerous books in Classical Mechanics. However, there appears to be no other book written for undergrads besides this one which contains an almost complete list of topics. For this reason, the present book remains the unchallenged text for an undergrad Classical Mechanics course for those instructors who do not wish to deviate from the established must-be-taught curriculum.

Unfortunately, this creates some displeasure among students since the book is plagued by many problems. The typesetting and the graphics are good but everything else is not that good. Not much planning was done and not much effort was placed to convert the initial lecture notes and emails into a coherent and pedagogical manuscript. And the flaws, in my opinion, are not the lack of answers for the problems at the back of the book, nor that the book is really too advanced, nor that the book is too mathematical as has been argued by other reviewers.

Instead I take issue with: (1) The writing style is poor. (2) The solved problems and examples are not well presented and their number is not enough to cover all concepts discussed in the book. There is a good fraction of unsolved problems however. (3) The ordering of the material. For example: Chapter 3 on Oscillators could be Chapter 1. Almost no Lagrangian formalism is used. Another example is Sections 5.1 and 5.2. They use only the concept of the Lagrangian. They do not fit in Chapter 5 which is about the Hamiltonian formulation of Mechanics. (4) Not only the material could have been ordered better but, more importantly, the presentation of the topics is fragmented. For example: In Section 1.4 to concept of a constraint is given. There is some discussion on the classification/distinction of constraints but the discussion is stopped and the most important distinction - holonomic vs. nonholonomic - is discussed in Appendix A of Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, instead of presenting the theory of variations and then explain how it is applied to physical problems, the authors open sections with titles such as `2.7 Solving Problems with Explicit Holonomic Constraints' and `2.8 Nonintegrable Nonholonomic Constraints - a method that works'. As a result, great confusion emerges between the mathematical techniques and the concept of constraints. I would have preferred that the same problems (some with and some without constraints) are first solved in Chapter 1 using virtual work and then in Chapter 2 using calculus of variations. (5) There are many important issues that are left as exercises and are not discussed in the text. For example: what is the relation between the energy and the Hamiltonian? (6) There is no section on classical scattering and cross sections. This is very surprising given that one of the authors is an accelerator physicist. The students learn about the topic in a single problem: Problem 28 of Chapter 4. (This explains why I claimed that the list of topics is almost complete and not complete.)

There are several other issues that bother me but hopefully the above list is enough. There is certainly a need for another book on Classical Mechanics that will contain the topics that this book contains but written with care, attention to detail and clarity. Until then, this book will be used by many instructors and you will have to buy it if you are an undergraduate student studying the subject. If you really want to avoid it, try Landau and Lifshitz's Mechanics, Third Edition: Volume 1 (Course of Theoretical Physics) which is an excellent book but it is requiring a higher level of mathematical skill and is missing topics that were developed after the authors' deaths (e.g. chaos) or found in other volumes of the series (e.g. relativity).
Munigrinn Munigrinn
I just spent the past semester taking the course using this book at Purdue University. It was a horrible experience, the explanations in the book are poorly written and poorly constructed. There are no examples in the book, which instead chooses to lecture endlessly on about mathematics in a way that is entirely aphysical, reducing learning from this book to often be the same as taking engineering -- endlessly memorizing equations and how to apply them. I got a B in the class in the end, but only because I used Marion & Thornton's book in parallel.

The entire semester, the professor said "I know, this book sucks. Sorry guys." So its not just me. Any professors looking at assigning this book, steer way clear. And a tip for the future: Any book that prints only in paperback can't be that good.
Uste Uste
Terrible book, that's all I can say. I own both Goldstein's classical mechanics and this book. If you compare the logic, both books are quite similar. HOWEVER, just read both books, you will see that Hand and Finch are probably just trying to become famous by publishing this piece of junk. In the foreward, it is even mentioned that this book is developed from a set of lecture notes used in Cornell....YES IT'S JUST a collection of lecture notes ONLY. You will need a good teacher to explain things to you before you attempt this book at all. Now look at Goldstein, it IS a textbook. You can just learn classical mechanics from reading Goldstein even if you have a terrible teacher. Furthermore, Hand and Finch don't give examples at all, and there is NO ANSWERS to the short-quiz questions found in the chapters, which dont make sense at all! The reason I am giving it 2 stars instead of 1 is that the problems in the end of the textbook are challenging and good, and not many typos are found throughout the book. In conclusion, don't waste your money on this, and if your instructor is using this book... God bless you!

Other books I recommend: Marion/Thorton does quite a good job, but it is probably too elementary, considering the fact that Lagrangian formulation is introduced only towards the end of the book, which doesnt reflect the importance of this subject in theoretical physics. However you will find many good examples in Thorton's book. IT IS A GREAT BUY.

ONCE MORE, DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY IN HAND/FINCH!!