cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution
eBook About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution ePub

eBook About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution ePub

by Paul Davies

  • ISBN: 0684818221
  • Category: Physics
  • Subcategory: Math Science
  • Author: Paul Davies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st edition (April 9, 1996)
  • Pages: 316
  • ePub book: 1797 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1297 kb
  • Other: docx txt rtf doc
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 897

Description

Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase.

Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase.

In About Time, Paul Davies discusses the big bang theory, chaos theory, and the recent discovery that the universe appears to be younger than some of the objects in it, concluding that Einstein's theory provides only an incomplete understanding of the nature of time. Davies explores unanswered questions such as: Does the universe have a beginning and an end? Is the passage of time merely an illusion? Is it possible to travel backward - or forward - in time? About Time weaves physics and metaphysics in a provocative contemplation of time and the universe.

Davies is an excellent author! This is my first read of one of his books and I found it easy to follow and very exciting to read. In fact I have purchased two more of his books and both seem to be of the same high quality of scholarship and easy style. Some of the concepts are tough but only because of our own individual histories and backgrounds. The physics are great, the math, held to a minimum but with enough insight into the math to make sense.

Examining the consequences of Einstein's relativity theory, an original work explores the mystery of time and considers black holes, time warps, time travel, the existence of God, nature of the universe, and humankind's place in the cosmos. 35,000 first printing.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Tam incelemeyi okuyun. About time: Einstein's unfinished revolution. Diğer baskılar - Tümünü görüntüle. About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution Paul Davies Sınırlı önizleme - 1996. About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution Paul Davies Metin Parçacığı görünümü - 1996.

About time: Einstein's unfinished revolution.

About Time : Einstein's Unfinished Revolution. In this book Paul Davies provides a comprehensive, brilliant discussion of the nature of time. Beginning with Einstein's revolution which abolished the classical view of absolute time and space, Davies ranges widely into the scientific and philosophical ramifications of relativity.

Einstein's time can be warped, leading to bizarre possibilities such as black holes and time travel, while making a. .

Einstein's time can be warped, leading to bizarre possibilities such as black holes and time travel, while making a nonsense of our perception of a 'now' or a division of time into past, present and future. In About Time Paul Davies tackles the tough questions about time, including the strange relationship between physical time and our psychological perception of it. He gives straightforward descriptions of topics such as the theory of relativity, the relation between time dilation and the speed of light and Hawking's 'imaginary time'

Einstein's greatest mistake - Two-timing the cosmos - Einstein's greatest triumph? . Now you see it, now you don't - Filling in time - Subjective time - Back door to our minds - Unfinished revolution - Epilogue - Notes - Bibliography - Index.

Einstein's greatest mistake - Two-timing the cosmos - Einstein's greatest triumph? - - Handwriting of God - Did the big bang ever happen? - - What's a few billion years among friends? .

An elegant, witty, and engaging exploration of the riddle of time, which examines the consequences of Einstein's theory of relativity and offers startling suggestions about what recent research may reveal. The eternal questions of science and religion were profoundly recast by Einstein's theory of relativity and its implications that time can be warped by motion and gravitation, and that it cannot be meaningfully divided into past, present, and future. In About Time, Paul Davies discusses the big bang theory, chaos theory, and the recent discovery that the universe appears to be younger than some of the objects in it, concluding that Einstein's theory provides only an incomplete understanding of the nature of time. Davies explores unanswered questions such as: * Does the universe have a beginning and an end? * Is the passage of time merely an illusion? * Is it possible to travel backward -- or forward -- in time? About Time weaves physics and metaphysics in a provocative contemplation of time and the universe.

Comments

AfinaS AfinaS
Excellent, thoughtful and authoritarian without being overly pendantic. The Universe is vastly more unusual and unexpected than ordinary life would lead us to believe. This book helps to clarify this -- or may be just bring up questions we may never have considered before. I would highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in our place in the Universe. My only suggestion is that the title is a bit misleading. The emphasis diverges from the idea of time per se, and drifts more into cosmology and the origin of the Universe. Don't get me wrong. This is not a criticism, but merely a suggestion for a better title.
Bladecliff Bladecliff
Over 5 or more years (of time) I have been reading books and articles on the "nature" of TIME, and have now become a serious student/investigator. Some books I have found to be extremely arcane, and though fascinating, impossible to agree or disagree with. Davies' book is not one of these. It is a beautifully written account of the issues AND history(ies) (in brief) of the important men and their attempts to grasp the true meaning of one of the most elusive yet important concepts we live with. He discusses the major controversies, and places them, briefly, in their historical context. At times, he manages to wax humorist as he lays out a hypothetical scenario. If you have little or no physics background, you are not likely to understand many/mosst of the major concepts that are involved in the cosmological understanding of TIME, but if you decide you want to 'get what you can for the fun of it' I heartily recommend.this book for its historical perspective and writing style. E> E> Roberts,Ph.D.
Karon Karon
It's a little old, and in physics, date of publication can be critical. It also veered away from the main topic, time, into a treatise on cosmology, and while cosmology has close ties to time, the book kind of lost sight of the main topic, which was supposed to be time. All in all, a decent book for those who are interested in the birth and growth of the universe, and how time fits into that puzzle.
Leyl Leyl
Beautifully written non-mathematical explanation of the General and Special Theories of Relativity. The book is divided into 2 sections. The first is all about what time is/isn't - fairly easy reading and totally fascinating. The second section is an explanation of Quantum Mechanics - also totally fascinating but very difficult (even without the math). Davies is a top notch writer.
Purebinder Purebinder
I liked this book. When I read the first pages, I thought that I had chosen the wrong book, but afterwards everything changed. Here you can find a light and clear review of many aspects of time.

It is not perfect, and some times it is not clear what the author means with "time reversal", etc, even if he tries to explain it several times. The theory about the proximity of Doomsday is also quite weak.

In spite of this, you find a clear view of time as it is currently known by science. I have not found many new ideas, but in general they are well structured and consolidates what you have read separately in many other books. Apart from that, it has good rhythm, and it is easy to read and understand.
HyderCraft HyderCraft
The reading so far has been very clarifying. Also, the fact that Professor Davies has a unique talent to explain puzzling concepts in Physics helped a lot for this. I recommend this book for all the ones who are fascinated about "time".
deadly claw deadly claw
This is a remarkable book because it covers a broad range of subject matter - relativity, time warps, black holes, the Big Bang, quantum theory, imaginary time, time travel - effortlessly and understandably. It serves as an excellent stand-alone introduction to these subjects or as a first step for readers who are planning to go on to read Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time or Kip Thorne's Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy (Commonwealth Fund Book Program).

The author, a Professor of Natural Philosophy (Physics) at the University of Adelaide in Australia, has the ability to explain these complex subjects intelligibly and enjoyably (his abilities in this regard are similar to those of Richard Feynman). Any reasonably intelligent reader should have little trouble following his exposition.

The only potential problem is that the book was written in 1994, and has not since been updated to reflect the (major) developments of the last decade but most of them build upon the foundations described here, so that it less of a problem that it might seem.

Follow-on reading suggestions:

* A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking.

* Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy (Commonwealth Fund Book Program) by Kip Thorne.
I like very much Paul Davies, especially books like The Mind Of God, but this one, About Time, is hard to follow ...
I feel like I am reading a collection of stories, with no obvious links to each other ... getting me feeling I don't know where the author wants to go
So when you get lost in a book, it's hard to follow.

Some parts are really deep and interesting, that's why I'll read the book till the end.
However, some parts are too much deep and hard to follow if you don't already have solid knowledge in:
philosophy, metaphysic, history of science and history of humanity (among others, which Mr Davies obviously has).