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eBook Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective ePub

eBook Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective ePub

by Mark Epstein

  • ISBN: 0300123418
  • Category: Medicine
  • Subcategory: Medicine
  • Author: Mark Epstein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (September 28, 2007)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1258 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1439 kb
  • Other: rtf txt mbr azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 111

Description

Mark Epstein's book is inspired by its lucidity. After Thoughts Without a Thinker, psychotherapy without a Buddhist perspective looks like a diminished thing. Doubts about the self are inevitable.

Mark Epstein's book is inspired by its lucidity. ―Adam Phillips, author of Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life. ―Jon Kabat-Zinn, author of Mindfulness for Beginners. The maturational process is to go into the doubt rather than away from it. Finally, the Buddha had a "vision of a psyche freed from narcissism.

Электронная книга "Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective", Mark Epstein

Электронная книга "Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective", Mark Epstein. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Psychotherapy without the Self book. Start by marking Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective as Want to Read

Psychotherapy without the Self book. Start by marking Psychotherapy without the Self: A Buddhist Perspective as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Электронная книга "Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective", Mark Epstein. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Realized beings can still be competitive, or narcissistc, or vulnerable to transference projections. Troubled, neurotic individuals can still be capable of profound insight.

Thoughts Without A Thinker - Mark Epstein. While I appreciate Epstein's attempt to draw parallels between Buddhist practice and psychotherapy, the overlap can seem a bit superficial at times. Western psychology- and in particular psychoanalysis- is too firmly rooted towards a conception of an underlying self. This is ultimately at odds with the Buddhist deconstruction of an essential, permanent self.

Psychotherapy Without the Self : A Buddhist Perspective. Immersed in Buddhist psychology prior to studying Western psychiatry, Dr. Mark Epstein first viewed Western therapeutic approaches through the lens of the East. This posed something of a challenge. Although both systems promise liberation through self-awareness, the central tenet of Buddha's wisdom is the notion of no-self, while the central focus of Western psychotherapy is the self.

Insights on the interface between Buddhist teachings and Western psychotherapy by the best-selling author of Thoughts without a Thinker.

His first book, Thoughts without a thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective has a welcoming forward by His Holiness the Dalai Lama .

His first book, Thoughts without a thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective has a welcoming forward by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and has been described as a landmark in the fields of Buddhism and psychotherapy. Next was Going to pieces without falling apart: A Buddhist perspective on wholeness; followed by Going on being: Life at the crossroads of Buddhism and psychotherapy; and Open to Desire: The truth about what the Buddha taught (2005, New York: Gotham).

Immersed in Buddhist psychology prior to studying Western psychiatry, Dr. Mark Epstein first viewed Western therapeutic approaches through the lens of the East. This posed something of a challenge. Although both systems promise liberation through self-awareness, the central tenet of Buddha's wisdom is the notion of no-self, while the central focus of Western psychotherapy is the self. This book, which includes writings from the past twenty-five years, wrestles with the complex relationship between Buddhism and psychotherapy and offers nuanced reflections on therapy, meditation, and psychological and spiritual development.

 

A best-selling author and popular speaker, Epstein has long been at the forefront of the effort to introduce Buddhist psychology to the West.  His unique background enables him to serve as a bridge between the two traditions, which he has found to be more compatible than at first thought.  Engaging with the teachings of the Buddha as well as those of Freud and Winnicott, he offers a compelling look at desire, anger, and insight and helps reinterpret the Buddha's Four Noble Truths and central concepts such as egolessness and emptiness in the psychoanalytic language of our time.

 

Comments

MOQ MOQ
This book is made up of a variety of papers that Mark Epstein has written over the course of his career. He uses a very formal language that is occasionally hard to understand. I found the content to be of use, but if I had known the writing style and layout of this book before I bought it I would most likely have thought twice about purchasing this particular text.
Mikale Mikale
I highly recommend this book for those who question the borderland between spirituality and psychotherapy. As a growth oriented psychotherapist, I have an ongoing curiosity about what defines psychotherapy as different from spiritual growth and realization. This book provides some key understandings of the correlations between buddhist practices and how they can be understood from a psychoanalytical perspective. Both camps benefit from this kind of intelligent communication between the two disciplines. I especially appreciated how concentration meditation can mislead a person into thinking they have "arrived" as they access a symbiotic experience, and not realize the further development of consciousness through the separation/individuation process, which unfolds out of this initial merged experience.
Mataxe Mataxe
It's a good book to have an understanding of meditation and how its viewed by a psychologist, but it's hard to read. Very blend and I keep falling asleep half way through my chapter...
Reemiel Reemiel
This is a wonderful book by a practicing psychiatrist, perfect for this point in my life. Based on a deep knowledge of both Buddhism and psychotherapy, Epstein resolves for me the perplexing apparent contradiction between Buddhism's "no-self" and psychotherapy's focus on the Self and its difficulties. Subtle, personally engaging and well-written, it is full of wisdom based on Epstein's broad study,reflection, and his own life experience.
Because it is a collection of articles and essays written over many years, there is some repetition, but it never hurts to hear these insights more than once.
Aver Aver
I like all Mark Epstein's books and I often reread them. I like his perspective and I find his books to be easy to understand. Of course, I also embrace his kind of pragmatic synthesis of western psychotherapy and eastern Buddhist views of the Self (or not Self, if you prefer).
Unde Unde
Enjoy this writer greatly. Beneficial read.
Sha Sha
Such a great find (as are the other books by the author). So much makes sense and it really isn't that complicated.
exceptional