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eBook The Emperor Of Scent ePub

eBook The Emperor Of Scent ePub

by Chandler Burr

  • ISBN: 0099460238
  • Category: Medicine
  • Subcategory: Medicine
  • Author: Chandler Burr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Arrow Books Ltd; New Ed edition (March 4, 2004)
  • Pages: 468
  • ePub book: 1624 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1234 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 810

Description

Chandler Burr is a phenomenal writer, later the NY Times smell critic and a lonely museum curator. He has also written about the launch of new fragrances and the working of that industry

Chandler Burr is a phenomenal writer, later the NY Times smell critic and a lonely museum curator. He has also written about the launch of new fragrances and the working of that industry. In the Emperor of Scent, Burr tells a terrific story, capturing the passion of Turin and the resistance of his peers. Burr tries like hell to explain the technology and fails at times.

Read "The Emperor of Scent A Story of Perfume, Obsession, and the Last Mystery of. .Books related to The Emperor of Scent.

For as long as anyone can remember, a man named Luca Turin has had an uncanny relationship with smells. Acclaimed writer Chandler Burr has spent four years chronicling Luca Turin’s quest to unravel the mystery of how our sense of smell works. What has emerged is an enthralling, magical book that changes the way we think about that area between our mouth and our eyes, and its profound, secret hold on our lives.

Burr's The Emperor of Scent, published in 2003, tells how the French-Italian scientist Luca Turin originated the theory about the .

Burr's The Emperor of Scent, published in 2003, tells how the French-Italian scientist Luca Turin originated the theory about the functioning of the sense of smell. As a result, The New Yorker proposed that Burr describe the creation of a perfume. Chandler Burr Profile Page at Bold Type Magazine Interview, author reading, and excerpt from "The Emperor of Scent"; plus Burr's Top Ten List of Perfumes. Narrative Magazine (fiction excerpt). An interview with Qu3stions.

Emperor of Scent book.

The Emperor of Scent Burr, Chandler Random House (USA) .

The Emperor of Scent Burr, Chandler Random House (USA) 9780375759819 Чандлер Бурр: Император Южной Каролины . But Chandler Burr, the New York Times perfume critic, spent a year behind the scenes observing the creation of two major fragrances. Описание: The highbrow humanist name-dropping book of the summer (NEW YORK magazine) is a must-read for any book group (NPR’s FRESH AIR).

The Emperor Of Scent (Paperback). Chandler Burr (author). The Emperor of Scent is a gem of a book- I was mesmerised and enlightened by the many perfect asides woven into the main body of this incredible true tale. - Alexandra Fuller "With the contagious enthusiasm of a nerd given the run of a chemistry lab, he has transformed a chance meeting with a curious biophysicist named Luca Turin into an amusing and poetic adventure in science and ar.

The Emperor of Scent'. Perhaps the only thing odder than the theory is the story of how Turin actually came up with it, and then of what happened to him when he did, which is what this book is about. Start with the deepest mystery of smell. Excerpted by permission.

In the tradition of Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief and James Gleick's Genius, The Emperor of Scent tells the story of Luca Turin, an utterly unusual, stubborn scientist, his otherworldly gift for perfume, his brilliant, quixotic theory of how we smell, and his struggle to set before the world the secret of the most enigmatic of our senses.

January 20, 2003 Issue. The Emperor of Scent. It's precisely this pungent leap from chemistry to metaphor that Burr negotiates so well in his fascinating and lucid book about the sense of smell. A French perfumer, asked to describe a particular scent molecule, declares, It smells of the woman who neglects herself. No one really knows how the nose works. For the person who figures it out, a Nobel prize surely waits, along with the lucrative gratitude of the multinational perfume companies.

In the tradition of Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief and James Gleick's Genius, The Emperor of Scent tells the story of Luca Turin, an utterly unusual, stubborn scientist, his otherworldly gift for perfume, his brilliant, quixotic theory of how we smell, and his struggle to set before the world the secret of the most enigmatic of our senses.

Comments

Zeks Horde Zeks Horde
It is good to know about Luca Turin, his theory about olfaction, and how science is a field where egos fight for fame and not for truth. First half of the book may be too technical sometimes, but still interesting for someone who wants to know more about the world of scent. Turin must be quite a character, and also quite an ego, but authentic. I enjoyed reading this book.
Lyrtois Lyrtois
Well, I haven't finished this book (I guess I am a slow reader or just don't have the time!). but what I have read is great! Can't wait to take this book with me on my vacation so that I can really enjoy this book.
Hanelynai Hanelynai
I had already read Luca Turin's perfume book; the reviews are absolutely hysterical and truly spot on. True confession: I am a rabid collector of old commercial perfume bottles. Had also read Burr's essays/reviews in various fashion magazines. But am truly loving this book; fascinating man, science and subject.
Broadcaster Broadcaster
The sense of smell is the most neglected, most protected, of our senses, especially in the developed world. So many of us are so far removed from smell, we ignore, distrust, or fear this sense. Scientists believe that the human sense of smell is every bit as good as that of our best friend, dogs. We just haven't developed it to the degree they have, Luca Turin exempted.

Yet the sense of smell is also the most primitive of the senses, and the most evocative. A particular smell can transport me back to a certain time or place more effectively than a song, or an image. Olfaction is wired to a more primitive part of the brain, which may explain its power and its unconscious influence.

But smell is also our most amazing sense. The resolving power of our sense of smell is orders of magnitude greater than the eye or the ear; in our noses we have the olfactory equivalent of a telescope AND a microscope (a scanning tunneling microscope, to be exact, if Turin is right). We can dectect the minutest difference between two chemicals, and scientists have shown that we can detect the presence of perhaps a SINGLE molecule among trillions of other particles.

And yet, smell is also the least understood of the senses. It has resisted classification and analysis, probably because of our own reluctance and disconnection to it.

That's what I loved about this book. It was an eye-opening (nose-opening?) examination of something I give so little thought to. And the more you think about it, the more you read this book, the more amazed you are that you have this thing, and how it works just blows your mind. It also reintroduced me to the pleasures of this sense that I usually neglect.

I am not a scientist in any of these fields and therefore am not really competent to evaluate, but Turin's theory smells right to me. While the mechanism is exotic, it seems to me quantum mechanics (Vibration) would be easier to do in the nose than what the Shapists propose. Therefore, according to the scientific principles of parsimony and Occam's razor, Turin's theory deserves careful examination if for no other reason.

Sadly, the theme of the tale, as Turin himself understands, is not unique to him. Vested interests and petty jealousy very often impede the process of discovery. Science is still a human endeavor.

This book is:

1) A fascinating tour of scents and how we experience them

2) An scientific discussion of how the sense of smell works

3) A profile of a fascinating person

4) A tragedy about cruel scientific orthodoxy and intellectual martyrdom. The casuality is not so much Turin as the process of discovery itself.

Very highly recommended!
CopamHuk CopamHuk
I loved this book when I read it years ago, loaned it out, lost track of it. So I decided I had to have another copy. A really great true story.
Kerahuginn Kerahuginn
Luca Turin is a modern day Renaissance man, a biologist who learns chemistry, physics, marketing, and international business development to launch a revolutionary new theory to explain the operational mechanism of smell. While others believe on limited theoretical basis and evidence that we smell by detecting the shape of molecules, Turin is convinced the mechanism is based on the electrical vibrations inherent in the atomic bonds. Turin spends years developing evidence to support his hypothesis, some of it involving smelling dangerous molecules, dealing with Russian businessmen, and traveling to exotic locations in search of the best ingredients.

Turin develops the quantum mechanical calculational methods to determine the vibrations of the molecules. At the end of the day, the man has a lot of evidence that his peers dont understand (you need to be world class in biology, chemistry, and physics), dont believe (they say smell is subjective) or dont want to hear because it threatens their life's work.

Turin is in the unfortunate position of being unable to convince his peers that vibration is the ticket to smell. Even the venerable Nature magazine hung him out to dry for more than a year as it dealt with referees who ultimately were non-believers. The public and his students loved Turin's BBC specials but it held no weight with the academics. In this regard Turin is his own worst enemy, since his experimental methods are as unpredictable and tempermental as the man himself. As a chemical engineer, while I could understand some of where Turin is going with this theory, I can see how many could be unconvinced. Self-promotion, arrogance, confrontation, sharp language, lack of patience, and lust for riches and Nobel prizes do not help the man's case.

It is only possible to admire Turin, as see that he followed the path of his greatest interests, for years trading professional and commercial success for the chance to pursue an eclectic grab-bag of subjects. Perhaps he is the only man on earth who is sufficiently knowlegeable in biology, fragrances, molecular and electo-chemistry, and quantum mechanisms to understand how smell works. His argument that the fragrance houses develop new molecules by hand rather than through predictive methods is a kick to the ground for the rival shapists.

Chandler Burr is a phenomenal writer, later the NY Times smell critic and a lonely museum curator. He has also written about the launch of new fragrances and the working of that industry. In the Emperor of Scent, Burr tells a terrific story, capturing the passion of Turin and the resistance of his peers. Burr tries like hell to explain the technology and fails at times. I am certain his editor like Stephen Hawkings told him to avoid any equations or non-child like charts that would have better explained these concepts, in the interests of actually selling the book. Burr tends towards long-winded narratives, excessive use of dialogue, and more description than analysis but has still put together a classic book.
Cells Cells
This book changed the way I view scent and why some of my favorite scents no longer transport me fully to a specific time /place due to cheap formulation changes. A fascination look into the politics and manufacturing of scent!
I love books that teach about something you would not ordinarily even think about. Well written---some of it too scientific for me but on the whole it was a page turner.