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eBook The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (Oxford Quick Reference) ePub

eBook The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (Oxford Quick Reference) ePub

by John Ayto

  • ISBN: 0192800078
  • Category: Medicine
  • Subcategory: Medicine
  • Author: John Ayto
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 23, 1994)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1371 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1243 kb
  • Other: mbr txt azw rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 610

Description

Series: Oxford Quick Reference.

Drawing on the unique resources of the Oxford English Dictionary and offering coverage of over 6,000 slang words and expressions from the Cockney ‘abaht’ to the American term ‘zowie’, this is the most authoritative dictionary of slang from the 20th and 21st centuries.

Oxford Quick Reference. Over 6,000 slang words and phrases

Oxford Quick Reference. Over 6,000 slang words and phrases. Full information for each entry: definitions, origins, and the date of the first use in print. Drawing on the unique resources of the Oxford English Dictionary and offering coverage of over 6,000 slang words and expressions from the Cockney 'abaht' to the American term 'zowie', this is the most authoritative dictionary of slang from the 20th and 21st centuries. The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang is a fascinating and entertaining collection, packed with illustrative quotations and providing full details of origins and dates of first printed use.

John Ayto and John Simpson. The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang. Slang dictionary - A slang dictionary is a reference book containing an alphabetical list of slang, vernacular vocabulary not generally acceptable in formal usage, usually including information given for each word, including meaning, pronunciation, and etymology.

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This dictionary presents an up-to-date record of modern slang.

This dictionary presents an up-to-date record of modern slang. Used Hardcover (1992).

Oxford, Dictionary, Slang.

Now, inThe Oxford Dictionary ofModern Slang, John Simpson and John Ayto have gathered together a vibrant collection of over 5,000 slang terms, drawn from the vastOxford English Dictionarydatabase. Each entry contains the headword, part of speech, and definition. The great majority also have at least one illustrative example of the term in context, often drawn from writers such as John Updike, Gore Vidal, Louise Erdrich, Jessica Mitford, and Thomas Pynchon.

Slang is language with its sleeves rolled up, colorful, pointed, brash, bristling with humor and sometimes with hostility. From "forty-rod whiskey" and "five-finger discount" to "bum rap," "buzz off," and "fly by night," slang words add zest to everyday speech. Now, in The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang, John Simpson and John Ayto have gathered together a vibrant collection of over 5,000 slang terms, drawn from the vast Oxford English Dictionary database. Each entry contains the headword, part of speech, and definition. The great majority also have at least one illustrative example of the term in context, often drawn from writers such as John Updike, Gore Vidal, Louise Erdrich, Jessica Mitford, and Thomas Pynchon. Many entries contain labels indicating the social group or discipline from which a word derives--such as Black English, theatrical, military, or nautical--as well as the region where it originated. In addition, when the term has had more than one meaning, the various senses are listed chronologically. The changes in meaning are often fascinating: "Slush fund," originally a navy expression, referred to money collected from the sale of "slush" (fat or grease obtained from boiling meat) and used to buy luxuries for the crew. "Snow bird" originally meant someone who joined or rejoined the Army in the winter for food and shelter. And both "to give someone the bird" and "to goose someone" were theatrical terms meaning "to boo a bad performance." The dating of terms also yields some surprises. "Out-of-sight," for instance, dates to 1896, "buzz off" to 1914, and "blind" (as in "blind drunk") first appeared in print in 1630. (On the other hand, the expression "gussied up," which seems old fashioned, first appeared in 1952). The etymologies are often interesting: the word "boondocks," for example, comes from the Tagalog word bundok (mountain), and those who use "poppy-cock" to avoid stronger language will be saddened to hear that it derives from Dutch dialect pappekak (soft excrement). Finally, the words have been gathered from all over the English-speaking world, including many from Australia--such as "ankle-biter" (child), "blue" (a redhead), "technicolor yawn" (vomiting)--and from the United Kingdom, such as "blimey" (a contraction of "God blind me") and "Thiefrow" (a nickname for London's Heathrow Airport, after its reputation for lax security). Ranging from age-old (but still common) slang expressions such as "mamzer" (Hebrew, "bastard") which appeared in English usage as early as 1562, to recent coinages such as "wilding" (a gang of youths on a rampage) which first appeared in 1989, this is an authoritative and up-to-date record of slang throughout the English-speaking world.

Comments

Frey Frey
Saw "Oxford" and thought I was getting the real deal.
This is not a good reference book. Constantly getting
"no further information" or "see this or that."
GYBYXOH GYBYXOH
It's an awesome dictionary, really helpful for translation students or translators that works with english language, its a must have! :)
Malodor Malodor
Beware: contrary to the item description above, this volume is not organized thematically; it does not contain any section.
Nuadador Nuadador
I purchased this book with the hopes of improving the dialog of contemporary characters in my writing. Unfortunately, most of the slang words included in this book is not very 'modern' and seem to come from the 20's-60's and earlier. This would be fine if you are writing a story about gangsters, gun molls or flower children.
Unfortunately, I really don't see my characters using words like 'far-out,' 'drongo,' or 'face-fungus.'
Overall, a disappointing purchase. Perhaps useful if you are writing historic fiction.
LivingCross LivingCross
In reference to LadyNaava's complaint that this volume doesn't actually contain current or recent slang. I fear that's impossible. At least for a bound reference. In the time it takes to print a book, let alone compile a dictionary, current slang changes, changes back, disappears and is replaced.

That said, the warning that this volume may not be up to date with many of the better "regular" dictionaries (which have recently added Homer's D'oh! after only twenty years) is appreciated.