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eBook The Metaphor of Mental Illness (International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry) ePub

eBook The Metaphor of Mental Illness (International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry) ePub

by Neil Pickering

  • ISBN: 0198530870
  • Category: Medicine
  • Subcategory: Medicine
  • Author: Neil Pickering
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 16, 2006)
  • Pages: 194
  • ePub book: 1307 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1237 kb
  • Other: doc lrf lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 485

Description

Neil Pickering is a lecturer in the Bioethics Centre of the Dunedin School of Medicine, at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. He has a PhD from the University of Wales. He teaches on undergraduate and graduate bioethics programmes at Otago.

Neil Pickering is a lecturer in the Bioethics Centre of the Dunedin School of Medicine, at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

This says that claimed mental illnesses, from ADHD to schizophrenia, really are illnesses providing they are sufficiently similar to agreed . Neil Pickering is a lecturer in the Bioethics Centre of the Dunedin School of Medicine, at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

This says that claimed mental illnesses, from ADHD to schizophrenia, really are illnesses providing they are sufficiently similar to agreed physical illnesses. This book proposes that this argument is flawed: the likenesses to which the argument appeals appear when these examples have been categorised as illnesses, rather than the categorisation being evidenced by or derived from the likenesses. Neil Pickering is a lecturer in the Bioethics Centre of the Dunedin School of Medicine, at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Neil Pickering ) and Psychiatry seven.

Oxford University Press (2005). This 'new philosophy of psychiatry' is an addition to both analytic philosophy and to the broader interpretation of mental health care.

Start by marking The Metaphor of Mental Illness as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Metaphor of Mental Illness as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Despite the currency of the notion of mental illness, its legal and medical legitimacy, and the panoply of psychiatric and other mental health services claiming to treat it, there are those who take the radical sceptical line that mental illness is a fabrication.

Автор: Pickering Название: The Metaphor of Mental Illness .

International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry. Despite the currency of the notion of mental illness, its legal and medical legitimacy, and the panoply of psychiatry and other mental health services which claim to treat it, there are those who take the radical sceptical line that mental illness is a fabrication. This is a book which takes this sceptical line seriously - perhaps more seriously than almost any other book not written by sceptics themselves.

Using a range of philosophical perspectives, it explores some fascinating questions about the nature of self: is. .

Using a range of philosophical perspectives, it explores some fascinating questions about the nature of self: is the person with dementia the same person as they were before? Are they even fully a person? . The book is recommended for a broad audience of health care providers and family caregivers. -Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

The Metaphor of Mental Illness. Mapping the Edges and the In-between. Recovery of People with Mental Illness. Philosophical and Related Perspectives. Trauma, Truth, and Reconciliation. Healing Damaged Relationships. Rudnick (e. Values and Psychiatric Diagnosis. Disembodied Spirits and Deanimated BodiesThe Psychopathology of Common Sense.

Mental illness: philosophy masquerading as medicine. Jeffrey A. Schaler, Professor 06 September 2007. Mental illness refers to the moral and ethical judgment of behavior, not biology, neurology or pathology. This distinction – discovered, not invented by professor of psychiatry emeritus Thomas Szasz over forty-five years ago – does not go out of style.