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eBook Obstructive Lesions: Pulmonic Stenosis, Aortic Stenosis, Coarctation of the Aorta (CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN THE YOUNG: NURSING INTERVENTION, UN) ePub

eBook Obstructive Lesions: Pulmonic Stenosis, Aortic Stenosis, Coarctation of the Aorta (CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN THE YOUNG: NURSING INTERVENTION, UN) ePub

by Karen Uzark

  • ISBN: 0838572030
  • Category: Nursing
  • Subcategory: Medicine
  • Author: Karen Uzark
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Appleton & Lange (January 1, 1983)
  • Pages: 89
  • ePub book: 1593 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1910 kb
  • Other: azw mbr mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 922

Description

systemic venous stenoses but then was extended to the treatment of aortic coarctation

This was then followed by application of stent technology to the pediatric population (1,2). The technique was initially used to treat branch pulmonary artery and systemic venous stenoses but then was extended to the treatment of aortic coarctation. In this issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, Mohan et al. (12) evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of stent implantation to treat aortic coarctation in young children and compare the results with those in older children. Stent therapy seems to be an attractive and preferred alternative to surgical or balloon therapy for treatment of aortic coarctation in the adolescent and young adult.

Aortic stenosis (AS or AoS) is the narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart (where the aorta begins), such that problems result. It may occur at the aortic valve as well as above and below this level. It typically gets worse over time. Symptoms often come on gradually with a decreased ability to exercise often occurring first. If heart failure, loss of consciousness, or heart related chest pain occur due to AS the outcomes are worse.

Coarctation of the Aorta: Management, Indications for Intervention, and . Cardiology in the Young.

Coarctation of the Aorta: Management, Indications for Intervention, and Advances in Care. Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine, Vol. 16, Issue Associated stenoses in the left heart are common in the setting of aortic coarctation. When Doppler data is equivocal, features of the cross-sectional echocardiogram can identify the sub-group of infants at increased risk. Export citation Request permission. URL: ology-in-the-young.

The primary physiologic effect of coarctation of the aorta and aortic stenosis is impedence of blood flow out of the . With time, both defects progressively worsen, and may require surgical intervention in the teenage or adult years.

The primary physiologic effect of coarctation of the aorta and aortic stenosis is impedence of blood flow out of the left ventricle, producing left ventricular strain. If unchecked, this progresses on a continuum leading to left-sided failure. Patients are asymptomatic in their younger years. While early and late postoperative results are quite good, these patients with obstructive lesions need continued medical and nursing follow-up throughout their adult years.

The risk of having additional obstructive lesions in neonatal coarctation of the aorta. Cardiol Young 2001;11:44–53.

Progress in Cardiovasc Dis 1999;42:59–74. 5. Alva C, Sanchez A, David F, et al. Percutaneous aortic valvuloplasty in congenital aortic valvar stenosis. Cardiol Young 2002;12:328–331. Allen HD, Gutgesell HP, Clark EB, et al. (ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001, pp. 970–988. The risk of having additional obstructive lesions in neonatal coarctation of the aorta.

Pulmonary arterial stenosis may be caused by postsurgical scarring after . It may manifest in the neonatal period with sudden cardiovascular collapse at 7 to 10 days of age when the ductus arteriosus closes

Pulmonary arterial stenosis may be caused by postsurgical scarring after palliation or repair of congenitally malformed hearts, as in tetralogy of Fallot, a distally migrated pulmonary arterial band, or after the LeCompte manoeuvre as part of an arterial switch operation. As with other obstructive lesions, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis reduces vascular cross sectional area, increasing ventricular impedance, resulting in a progressive pressure load on the corresponding ventricle. It may manifest in the neonatal period with sudden cardiovascular collapse at 7 to 10 days of age when the ductus arteriosus closes. Coarctation in later infancy and childhood is possible.

Pulmonary stenosis Aortic stenosis Coarctation of the aorta Balloon valvuloplasty Balloon angioplasty. Rao PS. Stents in the management of congenital heart disease in the pediatric and adult patients. Indian Heart J 2001; 53: 714–730. PubMedGoogle Scholar.

Although aortic coarctation was the most common indication for initial intervention (61%), adult interventions occurred predominantly for . Heart failure as a result of stenotic valvar heart disease in the young adult is rare.

Although aortic coarctation was the most common indication for initial intervention (61%), adult interventions occurred predominantly for aortic valve/left ventricular outflow tract (60%) and mitral valve (33%) lesions. Conclusions: Shone complex is an under-recognized entity associated with relatively low mortality in adulthood but substantial morbidity related to arrhythmias, heart failure, and interventions.

Coarctation (ko-ahrk-TAY-shun) of the aorta - or aortic coarctation - is a narrowing . Acyanotic congenital heart disease: Obstructive lesions. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics.

Coarctation (ko-ahrk-TAY-shun) of the aorta - or aortic coarctation - is a narrowing of the aorta, the large blood vessel that branches off your heart and delivers oxygen-rich blood to your body. When this occurs, your heart must pump harder to force blood through the narrowed part of your aorta. In addition, if the coarctation of the aorta is severe, your heart might not be able to pump enough blood to your other organs. This can cause damage to your heart and also can result in kidney failure or other organ failure.

Watch the video lecture "Obstructive Congenital Heart Lesions .

Watch the video lecture "Obstructive Congenital Heart Lesions – Congenital Heart Disease" & boost your knowledge! Study for your classes, USMLE, MCAT or MBBS. There are three common ones - pulmonic or pulmonary stenosis in which the pulmonary valve is abnormally formed and consequently, the right ventricle is usually hypertrophied, it has a much bigger workload, and often, the blood flow into the lungs is reduced. If this is very severe, it has to be dealt with in very early childhood, often with a balloon catheter that dilates up the pulmonic valve.