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eBook Of Sorcerers and Men: Tolkien and the Roots of Modern Fantasy Literature ePub

eBook Of Sorcerers and Men: Tolkien and the Roots of Modern Fantasy Literature ePub

by Michael D. C. Drout

  • ISBN: 0760785236
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Michael D. C. Drout
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble Audio (2006)
  • ePub book: 1258 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1196 kb
  • Other: txt doc lit mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 989

Description

In Of Sorcerers and Men, Professor Michael . Drout leads a fascinating tour of the masterworks that defined the genre, paying particular attention to the books of . Tolkien, the godfather of fantasy literature as we know it today.

In Of Sorcerers and Men, Professor Michael . Drout's deft assessment provides deeper insights into these beloved creations, and helps readers gain a better understanding of what makes fantasy literature so special.

Tales Before Narnia: The Roots of Modern Fantasy and Science Fiction by. . Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). This book is more focused on what Tolkien might have been reading at the time and "might" have sparked the imagination for his stories on than anything else. He once said that he wanted to create a kind of modern mythology for his time.

2006: Of Sorcerers and Men: Tolkien and the Roots of Modern Fantasy Literature (lecture).

Drout (b. 3 May 1968) is a professor of English and Chair of the English Department at Wheaton College in Newton, Massachusetts. 2006: Of Sorcerers and Men: Tolkien and the Roots of Modern Fantasy Literature (lecture).

Of Sorcerers and Men: Tolkien and the Roots of Modern Fantasy Literature, China: Barnes & Noble Publishing, 2006, page 56. ^ Curry, Patrick Defending Middle-Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity, New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin, 2004, pages 132–133.

Find nearly any book by Michael D. C. Drout. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Douglas A. Anderson, Michael D. Drout, Verlyn Flieger. ISBN 9780937058879 (978-37058-87-9) Hardcover, West Virginia Univ Pr, 2004.

Professor Michael . Drout leads a fascinating tour of the masterworks that defined the genre paying particular attention to the books of Tolkien, the godfather of fantasy literature as we know it today. Drout's deft assessment provides deeper insights into these beloved creations, and helps readers gain a better understanding of what makes fantasy literature so very.

Books Tell Us’: Lexomic and Traditional Evidence for the Sources of.Drout and Scott Kleinman.

Books Tell Us’: Lexomic and Traditional Evidence for the Sources of Guthlac A. Modern Philology 110 (2012): 1-29. Phoebe Boyd, Michael . Drout, Namiko Hitotsubashi, Michael J. Kahn, Mark D. LeBlanc and Leah Smith. Philological Inquiries 1: Methods and Merovingians, The Heroic Age 12 (2009). Lexomics for Anglo-Saxon Literature, Old English Newsletter (Fall 2009). Republished as Of Sorcerers and Men: Tolkien and the Roots of Modern Fantasy Literature (New York: Barnes and Noble Portable Professor Series, 2006).

Fantasy Anglo-Saxon literature Medieval literature Science fiction. Singers and Tales: Oral Tradition and the Roots of Literature

Fantasy Anglo-Saxon literature Medieval literature Science fiction. Michael Drout has published thirteen audio lectures for Recorded Books' Modern Scholar Series: Bard of the Middle Ages: The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer. Rings, Swords, and Monsters: Exploring Fantasy Literature. Singers and Tales: Oral Tradition and the Roots of Literature.

But what writers influenced Tolkien himself? Here, internationally recognized Tolkien expert Douglas A. Anderson has gathered the fiction of authors who sparked Tolkien’s imagination in a collection destined to become a classic in its own right. Andrew Lang’s romantic swashbuckler, The Story of Sigurd, features magic rings, an enchanted sword, and a brave hero loved by two beautiful women- and cursed by a ferocious dragon.

Contains 72 page booklet plus eight CDs in slipcase. Part of the Portable Professor series of audio lectures. From 'The Lord of the Rings' to the Harry Potter series, fantasy novels have captured the imagination of millions of readers and figure prominently on any list of best-loved books. The masters of the genre, authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien, Ursula K. Le Guin, Philip Pullman, and J. K. Rowling, have brought to life unforgettable characters who dwell in richly detailed, magical worlds that run according to their own internal logic. In 'Of Sorcerers and Men,' Professor Michael D. C. Drout leads a fascinating tour of the masterworks that defined the genre, paying particular attention to the books of Tolkien, the godfather of fantasy literature as we know it today. Drout's deft assessment provides deeper insights into these beloved creations, and helps readers gain a better understanding of what makes fantasy literature so very appealing. Contents: What is Fantasy Literature? - Origins of Modern Fantasy - Tolkien: Life and Language - The Hobbit - The Fellowship of the Ring - The Two Towers - The Return of the King - The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales, and other posthumously published work - Tolkien: Criticism and Theory - Imitations and Reactions: Brooks and Donaldson - Worthy Inheritors: Le Guin and Holdstock - Children's Fantasy - Arthurian Fantasy - Magical Realism and Conclusion.

Comments

Rexfire Rexfire
An in-depth look at Tolkien and the Fantasy genre in a historical and literary context. He looks at the personal life of Tolkien and his background as a linguist and professor of Anglo-Saxon literature and how these influenced his conception of what kind of world Middle-Earth was and the kind of history and mythology it had that gave his works coherence because they all emerged out of this structure that he had been building all his like, despite the fact that The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion are really very different styles of writing. He also looks at the history of the Fantasy genre in the Victorian era and examines some contemporary works of Fantasy to see how they incorporate, adapt too, or reject "Tolkien's shadow" in writing their own works.
porosh porosh
AGAIN, A CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR ONE OF MY SONS. IT WAS ONE OF MANY ON HIS GIFT LIST, SO I PURCHASED IT.
caif caif
Michael Drout is great!

However this product is the same series that he produced with the Modern Scholar. Same recordings, just different packaging. The eighth disc is just a sampler (of other Modern Scholar re-titled/packaged). So if you already have the Modern Scholar by Drout called, "Rings Swords and Monsters," it the same recording. :-(
Llanonte Llanonte
Drout really loves the Lord of the Rings and modern fantasy, and more than anything his enthusiasm for the subject matter makes for a great listening experience. If you've read the books yourself, then there is a high chance you'll disagree on something he champions. Drout freely admits his indulgent literari-type wild-goose chase comparisons of LoTR to World War II and Earthsea to Christianity are ultimately his personal interpretations and not agreed on by the original authors... but he goes on to belabor his interpretations. Part of the reason I enjoyed these was yelling at the CD 'You don't know what you're talking about there!'

I found the lectures engaging, and the man really knows his Tolkien. Probably my biggest dislike of these was his constant referring to Sir Terry Pratchett as a 'humorist who dabbled in fantasy' when I think Discworld is some of the best fantasy ever. Other great contemporary fantasy authors like Holly Lisle, Roger Zelanzy, Jim Butcher, Tad Williams, and Robert Jordan go unmentioned when discussing the roots and evolution of modern fantasy.

Might listen again someday.
LivingCross LivingCross
Professor Drout has a very appealing voice, and his lectures are quite interesting. Like Tolkien, Drout has a background in linguistics which adds a lot to his perspective. I loved hearing him speak Elvish. This series of 14 lectures kept my 12 year old and me entertained for weeks. I have followed up on some of his recommendations for other authors in the fantasy genre, and not been disappointed. Highly recommended!
Gavinranadar Gavinranadar
This was an impulse buy in a bargain bin, but I'm glad I got it. Professor Drout is lively and easy to listen to -- at no point did I find myself wishing he'd get to whatever point he was trying to make. I didn't agree with everything he said; he felt that there was a strong female presence in The Lord of the Rings when I found the female characters very 2 dimensional, for instance. But I did learn many things about the Fantasy genre and felt it was a good purchase.
Risinal Risinal
I bought this when I worked for Barnes and Noble but I am only starting to listen to it now. It is supposed to be about the fantasy genre in general right off the bat Michael Drout (the lecturer) is rubbing me the wrong way in that he barely gives any credit to C.S. Lewis as a co-founder of the fantasy genre along with J.R.R. Tolkien. Instead he ignores C.S. Lewis (almost completely) and for him it is all about Tolkien and yes he seems to be pretty fanatical about J.R.R. Tolkien. Well it is not all about J.R.R. Tolkien. True first came "The Hobbit" but then came the seven "Chronicles of Narnia" only to be followed by "The Lord of the Rings" which incidentally never would have been published had C.S. Lewis not continued to badger Tolkien into finishing The Lord of the Rings. I have always said and I stand by it that J.R.R. Tolkien was either extremely lazy, indecisive, or an extreme procrastinator when it came to his writing. For example his work "The Silmarillion" was started in the 1930's and by his death in the 1970's it still was not finished after roughly 40 years and what was done was stringed together and posthumously published by his son Christopher Tolkien. I have already mentioned how Lewis had to hound Tolkien to death to finish The Lord of the Rings which took Tolkien 10 years to finish. So why is Tolkien named as the "sole founder" of modern fantasy? A co-founder yes but the sole founder nope. One could also say that both Lewis & Tolkien's works were birthed in the meetings of "The Inklings" which also gets left out. For Michael Drout it is: Tolkien, Tolkien, & Tolkien. I think he should have did a lecture series strictly on Tolkien and not fantasy books in general.