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eBook Stolen Lightning: The Social Theory of Magic ePub

eBook Stolen Lightning: The Social Theory of Magic ePub

by Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe

  • ISBN: 0826400590
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Continuum; 1st edition (1982)
  • Pages: 581
  • ePub book: 1319 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1561 kb
  • Other: docx mbr mobi doc
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 165

Description

In this splendid, daunting, almost wicked book, Daniel O'Keefe gives us a work of unmatched scope and highly animated scholarship about how magic operates in human societies and how it has colored history and culture from the Stone Age to the present.

In this splendid, daunting, almost wicked book, Daniel O'Keefe gives us a work of unmatched scope and highly animated scholarship about how magic operates in human societies and how it has colored history and culture from the Stone Age to the present.

Stolen Lightning book. Start by marking Stolen Lightning: The Social Theory of Magic as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Dust jacket notes: Within the broad sweep of intellectual history.

STOLEN LIGHTNING, The Social Theory of Magic. By Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe. 'STOLEN LIGHTNING'' is a book about magic that tries to do too much - in fact, probably more than anyone can do in a single volume. 581 pp. New York: Continuum. Its great strength is in the sociological theory of magic that the author constructs.

Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download

Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Stolen lightning : the social theory of magic Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe. Book's title: Stolen lightning : the social theory of magic Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0826400590 :, . 0. Special Coded Dates: DLC, DLC. Library of Congress Call Number: BF1611. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 306/. Personal Name: O'Keefe, Daniel Lawrence, 1928-.

In this splendid, daunting, almost wicked book, Daniel O'Keefe gives us a work of unmatched scope and highly animated scholarship about how magic operates in human societies and how it has colored history and culture from the Stone Age to the present

In this splendid, daunting, almost wicked book, Daniel O'Keefe gives us a work of unmatched scope and highly animated scholarship about how magic operates in human societies and how it has colored history and culture from the Stone Age to the present.

Magic social action is made up essentially of symbolic performances, a. .

Magic social action is made up essentially of symbolic performances, a process to which linguistic symbolism is the key. Magic is ""rigidly scripted"" (having stolen its scripts from re-religion, it ""rigidities them to retain their efficacy""). Magic, particularly black magic, is a barometer of social pressures on the self.

Daniel Silva Hardcover Books. Danielle Steel Fiction & Literature Books.

Lc Classification Number. Daniel Silva Hardcover Books. Danielle Steel Modern & Contemporary Books. Danielle Steel Romance Hardcover Fiction & Literature Books. Social Sciences Education Textbooks.

DANIEL L. O'KEEFE, Stolen lightning, The social theory of magic, Oxford, Martin Robertson, 1982, 8vo, pp. xxii, 581, £1. This remarkable, erudite, argumentative, and often witty book surveys the seven great. categories of magic - medical magic, black magic, ceremonial magic, religious magic, the occult sciences, the paranormal, and magical cults and sects - drawing them together within a general and historical theory. O'Keefe views magic as a set of opportunistic borrowings from religion.

Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe (February 25, 1928 – August 29, 2012) was an.Daniel and Deborah O'Keefe married in 1963.

Daniel Lawrence O'Keefe (February 25, 1928 – August 29, 2012) was an American writer. O'Keefe published the book Stolen Lightning: The Social Theory of Magic in 1982.

Dust jacket notes: "Within the broad sweep of intellectual history a truly revolutionary book must address itself to the educated general reader as well as to the specialist; such were the major works of Frazer, Max Weber, Spengler, Toynbee and Freud. And such is Daniel O'Keefe's magisterial study of magic. This is a book that has drawn upon research in many disciplines to produce a truly general (and hence explanatory) theory of magic - a theory which will interest scholars in philosophy, sociology, religion, anthropology, history, psychology and other fields. But even more, this is a book that will appeal to every educated layperson who wants to understand magic's persistence. Here he will learn that magic was at one time the province of much of human understanding and that magical roots remain alive in many institutions of modern life; that magic once helped the human self to emerge and later shaped the institutions of the individual which still support that self; that a full understanding of the human experience even today requires a systematic explanation of magic; that without such understanding we may succumb in regression to a dangerous remedy which once helped us to advance. Through magic humanity has forever rebelled and then enslaved itself anew in structures of alienation of its own making. This is the story of the human past. It is also the record of the secular present, when even in a scientific age magical protest serves to remind us of the transcendent in everyday life. Yet, concomitantly and perennially, magic's Pyrrhic victories obscure man's native understanding that this transcendence is partly of his own making. This darkening of vision is evident in the current rash of escapist cults and mechanical rituals for transforming the self and the world. However, as this book emphasizes, even in less exotic forms the influence of magic remains pervasive...."

Comments

Frey Frey
As an interdisciplinary-anthropological work on magic, this book is certainly unique in its scope and coverage. I'm not familiar with any other text quite like it - aside from much more focused academic studies - so it's difficult to find points of comparison. However, as a comprehensive foundational model for the role of magic in society, it's a great start. I might nitpick on theory, but this is a fine piece of scholarship.
MilsoN MilsoN
More of a sociological perspective. Interesting but definitely wordy.
Xig Xig
As is on par with most academic works that deal with the subject of magic, you'll find that this book has some surprisingly accurate points to make about the conception of magic and its role in society...and you'll also find that the majority of the time the author is so clueless its obvious he never had any real exposure to magic, but only what other people theorized magic might be about.

In fact that's the biggest problem with this book. It's a lot of theory, but no data to back up the claims or warrant the sometimes overt bias this author has against magic. The overly moralistic judgments of this author shows little if any attempt to really conceptualize what magic is actually about, let alone attempt to accurately portray the people involved in magical activities.

The real issue here is that while the author has effectively engaged the material that other academic writers have presented on magic, he has failed to engage or read any source material about magic and consequently many of his claims are based on faulty assumptions as to what magic is, or the role it has in the lives of those who choose to use it. Also his portrayal of religion as fluid, evolving system of growth, with magic as a dogmatic discipline, is somewhat incorrect. Neither magic nor religion are as fluid or adaptible as they could be, but nor are they as dogmatic either.

Granted this book was published in 1983, but even with that publication date, the author easily could have gotten access to some books on the occult. As is this book should be read with a large salt lick on hand. 2 & a half stars out of five
krot krot
As is on par with most academic works that deal with the subject of magic, you'll find that this book has some surprisingly accurate points to make about the conception of magic and its role in society...and you'll also find that the majority of the time the author is so clueless its obvious he never had any real exposure to magic, but only what other people theorized magic might be about.

In fact that's the biggest problem with this book. It's a lot of theory, but no data to back up the claims or warrant the sometimes overt bias this author has against magic. The overly moralistic judgments of this author shows little if any attempt to really conceptualize what magic is actually about, let alone attempt to accurately portray the people involved in magical activities.

The real issue here is that while the author has effectively engaged the material that other academic writers have presented on magic, he has failed to engage or read any source material about magic and consequently many of his claims are based on faulty assumptions as to what magic is, or the role it has in the lives of those who choose to use it. Also his portrayal of religion as fluid, evolving system of growth, with magic as a dogmatic discipline, is somewhat incorrect. Neither magic nor religion are as fluid or adaptible as they could be, but nor are they as dogmatic either.

Granted this book was published in 1983, but even with that publication date, the author easily could have gotten access to some books on the occult. As is this book should be read with a large salt lick on hand. 2 & a half stars out of five
Kearanny Kearanny
In this splendid, daunting, almost wicked book, Daniel O'Keefe gives us a work of unmatched scope and highly animated
scholarship about how magic operates in human societies and how it has colored history and culture from the Stone Age to the present. Drawing on
an enormous body of knowledge-sociology, anthropology, philosophy, religion, history, psychologyhe explains how magic works; describes the different categories
(medical, black, ceremonial, religious, occult, paranormal, and magical cults and sects); and demonstrates the way in which all magic, whether it be Egyptian theurgy,
Zande witchcraft, Western astrology, or the current rash of cults, is a means of the individual's defense against social pressures: against the socializing force of religion,
against collective morality-a challenge, through history, to all official versions of reality.