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eBook Trends in Australian mortality, 1921-1988 (Mortality series) ePub

eBook Trends in Australian mortality, 1921-1988 (Mortality series) ePub

  • ISBN: 0644106956
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Australian Government Pub. Service (1991)
  • Pages: 230
  • ePub book: 1869 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1433 kb
  • Other: docx mobi lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 357

Description

Life expectancy & death. Trends in Australian mortality: 1921-1988. Based on data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, this publication monitors the trends in male and female mortality for 17 major categories of causes of death for each year between 1921 and 1988.

Life expectancy & death. Back to first page of report. Release Date: 01 Aug 1991.

Trends in Australian Mortality 1921-1988. Mortality changes and their economic consequences with particular reference to cause of death. Australian Institute of Health, Mortality Series No. 1. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service. The differential mortality of the sexes in Australia. McGlashan, e. Studies in Australian Mortality, Environmental Studies Occasional Paper No. 4. Hobart: University of Tasmania. Zimmermann, eds,Studies in Contemporary Economies. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. Ramakrishna, G. and .

Trends in Australian Mortality 1921–1988, Austra-lian Institute of Health Mortality Series No. 1, Australian Institute of. . 1, Australian Institute of Health. A descriptive study was conducted. Deaths due to communicable diseases from 1907 to 1997 were tallied, according to the International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD-9).

Results: Age-standardised falls mortality rates have steadily declined in Victoria, and remained unchanged between . d’Espaignet . van Ommeren . Taylor . Briscoe . Trends in Australian mortality 1921–1988.

Results: Age-standardised falls mortality rates have steadily declined in Victoria, and remained unchanged between 1988 and 1997 in South Australia. In both states, age-standardised falls hospitalization rates have increased significantly (in Victoria, RR 1. 34; and South Australia, RR 1. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare/AGPS, Canberra, 1991, Mortality Series No . oogle Scholar. A Dictionary of Epidemiology, ed.

Maternal death or maternal mortality is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy.

Maternal death or maternal mortality is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes. The maternal mortality ratio, on the other hand, is the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births.

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Edouard T. d'Espaignet. Trends in Australian mortality, 1921-1988. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Trends in Australian mortality, 1921-1988 from your list? Trends in Australian mortality, 1921-1988. Published 1991 by Australian Government Pub. Service in Canberra.

Conclusion : Melanoma mortality in Australia peaked in about 1985 and has now plateaued 5 6 Australian age standardised mortalities (per 100000 person years) for melanoma were recently reported to have risen from . 0 in men and . 9 i.

Conclusion : Melanoma mortality in Australia peaked in about 1985 and has now plateaued. On the basis of trends in cohorts it can be expected to fall in coming years. 5 6 Australian age standardised mortalities (per 100000 person years) for melanoma were recently reported to have risen from . 9 in women in 1950-4 to . 2 and . 3, respectively, in 1990-1.

Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2015: estimates by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank Group and the United .

Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2015: estimates by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank Group and the United Nations Population Division. aternal Mortality – trends. The estimates for 1990 to 2015 presented in this report are the eighth in a series of analyses by the MMEIG to examine global, regional and country progress in reducing maternal mortality. To provide increasingly accurate maternal mortality estimates, the previous estimation methods have been refined to optimize use of country-level data and estimation of uncertainty around the estimates.

Reducing or even eliminating important disparities in mortality that persist with regards to geography and several socioeconomic factors is one of the greatest challenges ahead. Keywords: Mortality, longevity, health, trends, Canada. Robert Bourbeau, Université de Montréal.

The paper analyses a time series of infant mortality rates in the north of England from 1921 to the early 1970s at a spatial scale that is more disaggregated than in previous studies of infant mortality trends in this period. The paper describes regression methods to obtain mortality gradients over socioeconomic indicators from the censuses of 1931, 1951, 1961 and 1971 and to assess whether there is any evidence for widening spatial inequalities in infant mortality outcomes against a background of an overall reduction in the infant mortality rate.