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eBook The Riverside Villas Murder (Penguin Modern Classics) ePub

eBook The Riverside Villas Murder (Penguin Modern Classics) ePub

by Kingsley Amis

  • ISBN: 0141049561
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Kingsley Amis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (June 7, 2012)
  • ePub book: 1547 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1891 kb
  • Other: doc docx lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 445

Description

The Anti-Death League (Penguin Modern Classics).

The Anti-Death League (Penguin Modern Classics). THE RIVERSIDE VILLAS MURDER was his stab at the classic early twentieth-century detective novel; the central hero detective figures of it, the bachelor aesthete Colonel Menton and the teenage Peter Furneaux, might well have gone on to figure in a whole series of murder mysteries set in the 1930s (though somehow it seems better they did not).

The Riverside Villas Murder. Series: Penguin Modern Classics. What was a suspected student prank is followed by murder. At first it is impossible to see the connection, but the eccentric Colonel Manton does. With Peter's help the Colonel unravels a mystery that strikes fear into the heart of a genteel suburban neighbourhood and gives Peter rather more excitement than he bargained for at the tennis club social. This meticulously paced thriller shows Amis at his most subtle and daring. Imprint: Penguin Classics. Published: 07/06/2012.

Kingsley Amis is best remembered today as the author of comic novels-perhaps even the pre-eminent writer .

Kingsley Amis is best remembered today as the author of comic novels-perhaps even the pre-eminent writer in that genre during the second half of the 20th century. But you would hardly guess it if you looked just at his output from the late 1960s to the mid-1970s. The Riverside Villas Murder (1973) is an old-school British detective story, while The Alteration (1976) is an alternative history about England in a world that had never experienced the Reformation. All this happened in the aftermath of Amis’s 1965 divorce from Hilary Ann Bardwell after more than 15 years of marriage.

Penguin Modern Classics. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 8 x . 1 Inches.

The Riverside Villas Murder - Penguin Modern Classics (Paperback). Kingsley Amis (author) Added to basket. Kingsley Amis (author). 9 Added to basket.

Kingsley Amis's (1922-95) works take a humorous yet highly critical look at British society, especially in the period following the . Библиографические данные. The Riverside Villas Murder Penguin Modern Classics.

Kingsley Amis's (1922-95) works take a humorous yet highly critical look at British society, especially in the period following the end of World War II. Born in London, Amis explored his disillusionment in novels such as That Uncertain Feeling (1955). His other works include The Green Man (1970), Stanley and the Women (1984), and The Old Devils (1986), which won the Booker Prize. Amis also wrote poetry, criticism, and short stories.

The Riverside Villas Murder (Hardcover). Published 1974 by Book Club Associates.

Author(s): Kingsley Amis. The Riverside Villas Murder (Hardcover). Hardcover, 224 pages.

series Penguin Modern Classics. What was a suspected student prank is followed by murder

A mummy is stolen from a small town museum along with some Roman coins and a soaking wet man collapses in fourteen year. series Penguin Modern Classics.

Kingsley Amis was born on 16 April 1922 in Clapham, south London, the only child of William Robert Amis . 1973 The Riverside Villas Murder.

Kingsley Amis was born on 16 April 1922 in Clapham, south London, the only child of William Robert Amis (1889–1963), a clerk for mustard manufacturer Colman's in the City of London and his wife, Rosa Annie (née Lucas). The Amis grandparents were wealthy, William Amis's father, glass merchant Joseph James Amis, owning a mansion. 1997 The King's English: A Guide to Modern Usage (name in part a pun as he was sometimes called "Kingers" or "The King" by friends and family, as told by his son Martin in his memoir Experience).

The BBC's own description of this piece: A classic armchair mystery, "The Riverside Villas Murder" has for its hero a 14-year-old boy, Peter Furneaux

The BBC's own description of this piece: A classic armchair mystery, "The Riverside Villas Murder" has for its hero a 14-year-old boy, Peter Furneaux. The play begins on a summer evening in 1936 and, like all 14-year-olds, Peter is hovering hopefully on the brink between sexual inexperience and initiation. But he is forced into manhood when a crime, truly murderous, is committed by an unknown and almost unidentifiable assailant. Only Peter begins to guess at the truth - a dangerous truth - which leads him to the river bank by moonlight.

Riverside Villas Murder

Comments

Thohelm Thohelm
In the late Sixties and Seventies the great British comic novelist Kingsley Amis began to experiment with genre, seeing what he could do by bringing his own spin to the novel of the supernatural (and so produced THE GREEN MAN) and the dystopian novel (THE ALTERATION). THE RIVERSIDE VILLAS MURDER was his stab at the classic early twentieth-century detective novel; the central hero detective figures of it, the bachelor aesthete Colonel Menton and the teenage Peter Furneaux, might well have gone on to figure in a whole series of murder mysteries set in the 1930s (though somehow it seems better they did not). Though the actual mystery involving a dying cad stumbling in a rainstorm into a suburban living room is quite clever in terms of how it is worked out ultimately (it will remind you very much of murder mysteries of its era), Amis's true interests are in observing the profoundly middle-class milieu and in Peter's psychosexual development as a young man. We learn that Peter, as a fourteen year-old boy, not only has strong desires for young women (which are miraculously realized during the course of the novel) but that he has had quite a bit of sexual practice with the other boys in his class at school; this, and the Colonel's homosexuality, are both treated quite factually in the novel as something the characters not only have in their characters but that they must speak around in odd and uncomfortable ways. Oddly, though, Amis himself seems at times a bit squeamish with these simple sexual facts, and for all his attempts at frankness himself often speaks in euphemisms and in foreign terms; though he was undoubtedly being quite straightforward for the time in which the novel was written, the effect today is a bit peculiar--as if he's trying to be bold and honest but can't quite bring himself all the way. Amis for once eschews his usual boorish alcoholic bounder characters, and the central (male) figures that emerge in the novel are strikingly original: the jazz-loving and upright Colonel, the thoughtful and resourceful Peter, and Peter's vain and bluff middle-class father (whose portrait is the best thing in the book). Alas, as is usual for Amis, his female characters do not fare so well, and are mostly enigmas seen through a his usual lens of distrust and sexual longing.
Llbery Llbery
It was a surprise to see a crime novel from the author of Lucky Jim and the consequence must read it reaction. It is well written and depicts the style of policing which is very much different from the crime dramas seen on television today.

On the whole it is enjoyable. The characters are described quite well, and gradually all the different seemingly unconnected strands are joined up.

The main dissatisfaction with the story is that some how it does not create the tension one normally finds in good crime drama. While all the strands are drawn together by the end of the book, one feels that there could have been more indication of what was happening at different stages. For instance why was young Peter so important that he was able to lead to missing links? Is it credible that he was the only person who could have gone into the river- the crime scene?

Developing the story by way of focusing on the fourteen year old boy is an interesting variation. But was there such a lack of interesting girls that Peter kept on with the seemingly dull Daphne?

Amis succeeds, as with his other books, in giving a very clear picture of life in a particular pocket of Britain. Maybe that is his strength , more than crime fiction.