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eBook ARCTIC CROSSING : A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and Inuit Culture ePub

eBook ARCTIC CROSSING : A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and Inuit Culture ePub

by Jonathan Waterman

  • ISBN: 0679310908
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Jonathan Waterman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf New York 2001; First Edition edition (April 10, 2001)
  • ePub book: 1816 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1494 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf docx lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 209

Description

Arctic Crossing book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Arctic Crossing: A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and Inuit Culture as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

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Arctic Crossing: A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and Inuit Culture.

Arctic Labyrinth - The Quest for the Northwest Passage. That is for one book or as many as you like.

A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and Inuit Culture

A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and Inuit Culture. by Jonathan Waterman. He lingers for days at a time with hospitable but intensely private groups of Inuit, whose fragile ecosystem and peculiar oral culture have been nearly destroyed by incursions of both rapacious and well-meaning kabloona ( bushy-eyebrows, Inuit slang for Caucasians).

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He concludes from his investigations that the Inuit probably did visit Franklin's ships while the crew was still on board and that .

He concludes from his investigations that the Inuit probably did visit Franklin's ships while the crew was still on board and that there were some Inuit who actually saw the sinking of one of the ships. Все результаты Поиска книг Google Библиографические данные.

Items related to ARCTIC CROSSING : A Journey Through the Northwest .

Items related to ARCTIC CROSSING : A Journey Through the Northwest Passage. Home Jonathan Waterman ARCTIC CROSSING : A Journey Through the Northwest Passage and. When Jonathan Waterman set out to cross the Arctic Circle by way of kayak, cross-country skis, and a dogsled, he was less interested in conquering the 2,200 miles between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans than in learning to live as the Inuit had before him (Inuit, for The People, is the name Canadian Eskimos prefer).

The Northwest Passage (NWP) is the sea route to the Pacific Ocean through the Arctic Ocean, along the northern coast of North America via waterways through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The eastern route along the Arctic coasts of Norway and Siberia is accordingly called the Northeast Passage (NEP). The various islands of the archipelago are separated from one another and from the Canadian mainland by a series of Arctic waterways collectively known as the Northwest Passages or Northwestern Passages.

Jonathan Waterman's 2,200-mile journey across the roof of North America took him through Inuit communities in Alaska to Nunavut, Canada's new, self-governed territory.

a journey through the Northwest Passage and Inuit culture. Canada, Northwest Passage, Passage du Nord-Ouest, Northern Canada. 1st ed. Published 2001 by Knopf in New York.

Comments

Vozilkree Vozilkree
I am always amazed and delighted by Jonathan Waterman's skill with language, and with his ability to convey his explorations of both external and internal landscapes. This is a writer who loves wild places, but never seeks to conquer them.
Arctic Crossing gives readers a genuine view into the challenges of solitary travel, and a welcome understanding of the rich Inuit culture.
Waterman sugar coats nothing - not the cold, not the real dangers of his travels.Yet he captures the sweetness of learning to "watch birds" rather than identify, of a reunion with his wife that helps him regain his center. He catapults readers right into places in the world and in the heart that most would have never otherwise travelled.
Loni Loni
This book is beautifully written! Unlike most adventure books, Waterman's account of his 3-year Arctic adventure, leaves behind the hero perspective and sincerely tells a story about the Inuit culture, the Arctic landscape and its amazing wildlife, and how he travels solo through it all. Find out what it would be like to journey alone without seeing another person (or signs of another person) for weeks at a time...how many of us have been completely alone, even for a day? His details of the people once called Eskimos are thoughtful and compassionate. The Inuit are faced with modern day assimilation while desperately trying to hold on to their 1,000 year old traditions. This struggle is carefully outlined, as he was able to get close to "The People". His encounters with wildlife, especially bears, made me wish I were there, but at the same time thankful to be reading about it in the comforts of home. This book is for anyone wanting to know the meaning of true exploration and wanting to learn more about the beuaty and mystery of the Arctic and Inuit.
Ballazan Ballazan
This is one of those rare books that will stand larger with time. Waterman's journey through the Arctic Circle becomes a circling through both a culture and through the soloist's heart, a sort of Odyssey by kayak and with shotgun. There is everything to admire about this thoughtful book, the writing, the almost transparent self protrait, the ineffable scholarship, the raw adventure, and - refreshingly in this day of chest-thumping adrenaline junkies - an ethic of self preservation vs. summit-fever risk taking. Ironically, as the author set out upon this solitary epic, his stated intention was to avoid an epic. He judges the sea currents the way he judges bear tracks, with an eye to not only surviving, but thriving. His storytelling is pitch perfect. In presenting the Inuit, he gives us an ancient hunter culture stripped of the noble savage. He sketches the overlay of post-modern Western civilization in the "wastelands" without a preachment, only a fenceline in the middle of nowhere and surly guards on alert against no one. As icebergs metamorphose into animals, and animals shape-shift into driftwood, we grow into an alternate reality, one where trees are like magical trespassers. He shows this immortal land as entirely mortal and vulnerable, nothing new there. But where he finds a long dead Western explorer, it is cautionary, for it is himself - and us - that lie in the barrens without a witness. All in all, Arctic Crossing is a haunting book, beautifully written, utterly authentic, wise, poignant, and warmed throughout by one man's quest for the human condition.
IGOT IGOT
This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the Arctic, Alaska--or simply a good adventure tale. Jon Waterman is a veteran of a quarter century's worth of outdoor epics worldwide. ARCTIC CROSSING documents the biggest epic of them all, his solo, muscle-powered odyssey through the Northwest Passage.
Yet ARCTIC CROSSING isn't just a travel narrative. It yields a treasure trove of carefully researched detail about everything from polar bears and seals to Inuit politics and the latest in survival and wilderness travel technique. Read it.
Zetadda Zetadda
I like Jon's writing, it's filled with thought and insight into the place where he is. Wether he's preparing to climb the mountains of Alaska, kayak the gulf of Baja, or traverse the frigid Canadian Arctic, Jon does his homework. I am impressed by the degree of research he puts in prior to embarking on a trip. For it is not just the how of adventuring, the going from point A to B that concerns him, but rather who has been there before, who is there now, what was this place like and how has it changed for better or worse.
In this, his eighth book, he tells us about his 1997 2,200-mile journey across the Arctic, much of it alone. Here are his first-hand observations of the Inuit - their life, language, beliefs, and their reactions to global assimilation. He also reveals the extreme physical risks and psychological dangers as he kayaked and skied the legendary Northwest Passage. This book recently won the 2001 Banff Mountain Book Festival Best Adventure Travel Book Award.
You can't go wrong with any of Jon's books. I look forward to his next work!
Vudomuro Vudomuro
This is a wonderful book. I like to read adventure travel but often dislike the authors. This book not only tells a great adventure travel story with an informative insight into the Inuit culture but is well written and presented by a likable writer. There are many facets to this story. Waterman travels by several different modes including on foot, skis, dog sled, and sailing kayak. He encounters a variety of arctic wildlife and a solitary side of himself. The look at the struggle of the arctic peoples trying to find a place in the modern world is worth the reading all by itself. I can't think of an expedition book that I have read that satisfied so many parts of my mind. Made me want to go there and glad that I can't. Great winter reading. A rare find. I will pass this one on to my friends.