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eBook Oyster ePub

eBook Oyster ePub

by Janette Turner Hospital

  • ISBN: 1860491235
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Janette Turner Hospital
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Virago Press; 1st edition (1996)
  • Pages: 402
  • ePub book: 1460 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1606 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr azw lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 508

Description

Read on. Also by Janette Turner Hospital. Mostly, when it nested and tucked us under its fetid wing, the stink of dead cattle would predominate; or else that particular rank sweetness of rotting sheep

Read on. Mostly, when it nested and tucked us under its fetid wing, the stink of dead cattle would predominate; or else that particular rank sweetness of rotting sheep. On certain days, when hot currents shimmered off Oyster’s Reef, we could detect the chalk-dust of the mullock heaps, acrid; or, from the opal mines themselves, the ghastly fug of the tunnels and shafts. Sometimes there was almost nothing, just the blankness of the outback heat, and this felt like a grace newly recognised.

Janette Turner Hospital has been called by the Times Literary Supplement one of the most powerful and innovative writers in English today. Oyster has received critical acclaim internationally.

Janette Turner Hospital was born in Melbourne and grew up in Queensland. She is currently Professor of English and Distinguished Writer in Residence at the University of South Carolina. Библиографические данные. Janette Turner Hospital.

Born in 1942, Janette Turner Hospital grew up on the steamy sub-tropical coast of Australia in the north-eastern state of Queensland. See if your friends have read any of Janette Turner Hospital's books.

Janette Turner Hospital (née Turner) (born 12 November 1942) is an Australian-born novelist and short story writer who has lived most of her adult life in Canada or the US, principally Boston (Massachusetts), Kingston (Ontario) and Columbia (South C. .

Janette Turner Hospital (née Turner) (born 12 November 1942) is an Australian-born novelist and short story writer who has lived most of her adult life in Canada or the US, principally Boston (Massachusetts), Kingston (Ontario) and Columbia (South Carolina). Turner was born in Melbourne and grew up in Queensland. She studied at the University of Queensland and Kelvin Grove Teachers College, gaining a BA in 1965. She holds an MA from Queen's University, Canada, 1973.

Janette Turner Hospital's stories have won widespread international acclaim for their dazzling style, intellectual depth and crackling energy

Janette Turner Hospital's stories have won widespread international acclaim for their dazzling style, intellectual depth and crackling energy. Her characters oscillate between estrangement and a sense of belonging, as Hospital herself has suffered geographical displacement from the deep north of Australia to the deep south of the United States. Seven of these fourteen stories were included in the 'North of Nowhere' section of Collected Stories (UQP 1995). Seven, including 'South of Loss', are published here in book form for the first time.

Janette Turner Hospital has been called by the Times Literary Supplement "one of the most powerful and innovative writers in English today. Oyster has received critical acclaim internationally, and was short-listed for the prestigious Miles Franklin Award and the National Book Award in Australia. Outer Maroo, a small, opal mining town in the Australian outback, is stewing in heat, drought, and guilty anxiety.

by Janette Turner Hospital. Find similar books Profile. Out here silence is the dimension in which we float. It billows above us like the vast sails of galleon Earth, ballooning into the outer geography of the Milky Way; it washes below us where the opal runs in luminous veins; it stretches west as far as the shores of the Ice Age, nothing between then and now but rusted and powdering rock.

Item Information:Author : Turner Hospital, Janette. Product Information:TITLE: Oyster. Weight: 822. Other Details:Condition : Good. Oyster by Janette Turner Hospital (Hardback, 1996). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Book by Hospital, Janette Turner

Comments

you secret you secret
OYSTER is a literary tale about the fictional town of Outer Maroo in the bush outback of Queensland, Australia. The 87 residents of Outer Maroo don't want "foreigners," a term that applies to anyone not already in Outer Maroo, because they have something to hide: the ghastly happenings thirteen months ago at Oyster Reef, a religious commune.

There are no oysters on Oyster Reef. Oyster is the name the cult leader gave to his self. There are opals there, though. Oyster Reef is not a reef. It is way out in the outback beyond the end of the rail line, off the map. To get there, you'll need a four-wheel drive, extra petrol tanks, spare vehicle parts and a driver who knows the bush country. Foreigners can't buy round trip tickets, however.

The story begins when two foreigners, one from Melbourne and another from Boston, arrive in Outer Maroo, at high noon on Monday, looking for their young loved ones who were mesmerized by Oyster. From there, the author cleverly interweaves story and back-story, gradually untangles her characters and ultimately unravels Outer Maroo itself, all in a week's time.

OYSTER is the best work of literary fiction I can recall reading, and is more engaging than most of the genre and commercial fiction I've read. The prose crackles, the characters are vivid, the pace is precise and there are tasteful flavors of suspense, mystery, sci-fi and spice.

Janet Turner Hospital was born and raised on the steamy coast of Queensland. She knows the terrain, and the lingo too. Oops, there's a little problem there. Even if you're a reader adept at sliding over unknown words and pressing on, you still might feel you missed the lay of the land. I catalogued 46 words peculiar to Australia, New Zealand or Great Britain. Does your Ute have a roo bar or a bull bar? Did you ever go noodling through mullock or potch? You would know that a Jackamara woman would be tough, wise and ironic if you've read Mudrooroo, an aboriginal novelist. Did you ever eat barbequed jumbuck, charred goanna strips, fried emu eggs, or fire-toasted damper? That's all tucker. At least you should know about bora rings and corroborees that those Wankumara do (a.k.a. Wanggumara, Murii) and bore-water too.

There are fine threads about mirages and powerlessness in OYSTER, but the tightrope is cult religion, which stretches from the likes of Jonestown and Waco to Oyster Reef. Janet Turner Hospital writes succinctly. Religion, like sex, can be horrific or sublime.
Granigrinn Granigrinn
Set in a part of Queensland Australia so remote it's not even on the map, Janette Turner Hospital's riveting novel exudes the shimmering colors of the gem which is found there - the opal. The locals don't want their whereabouts known for a variety of reasons, tax evasion, criminal activity, paranoia in general and they're making lots of money. Then a man all dressed in white comes to town and reels them in like so many fish - and he wants privacy, too, because he's quickly has a cult following comprised of young people looking for various things.

All this starts to come apart when two strangers come to town looking for their missing children - missing now for two years. Between them, a local geologist, a character named Major Miner and a young resident of the town who wants out desperately, the plot unravels.

Hospital writes beautifully and the reader is kept totally involved as the themes of disconnect, memory and language weave skillfully through the plot.
Vojar Vojar
Near the end of the last century in a small Australian opal mining town named Outer Maroo, so obscure that it is not found on any map, Oyster, a mysterious religious cult figure, mesmerizes almost everyone in the community. (Only Susannah Rover, the teacher, and Charles Given of the Living Word Church and a few others were not drawn to him.) Obsessed with the idea that something of cosmic proportions will happen in 2000, many of the inhabitants of this little town at first buy into the sayings of this stranger, dressed all in white and with "limpid blue opalescent" eyes. He is a most persuasive speaker: for example, "I will make you a fisher of opal. . .if you follow me." Later two strangers arrive in the village, looking for a son and daughter, who have mysteriously disappeared and who (they believe) were under the spell of Oyster. While Ms. Hospital's gifts as a storyteller are magnificent, it's hard to know if she was influenced by say Jim Jones and Jonestown in 1978 when 913 of his followers apparently committed suicide or David Koresh and the Branch Davidians in 1993 when 80 or more people perished. There are certainly parallels to be drawn as Ms. Hospital's subject obviously is timely. We had Heaven's Gate in 1997 when Applewhite and over 30 of his followers committed mass suicides. A cult figure in Georgia was recently convicted of sex crimes against children, and other religious crazy groups-- I personally know of one in Florida-- pop up like dandelions in the spring. This book says so much about religious extremists, sexual depravity in the name of God, mob psychology, and the nature of evil-- and hope too but only in lower case letters. Ms. Hospital, however, is somewhere way past Joseph Conrad and Nathaniel Hawthorne, just to name two writers obsesssed with the darkness of the human heart.

The author tells a wonderful tale and is as good as any writer I can think of at building suspense and dropping clues along the way as the story builds to a devastating climax. Although her prose is dense and chock-full of Australian words and phrases, she is not a difficult read. She does beautiful and totally accurate things with words, making a verb out "trampoline", for example. Mercy Given, with a transparent name, describes saints in the DICTIONARY OF GREAT PAINTINGS OF THE WESTERN WORLD as "the people with golden saucers stuck to their heads." When one character smiles, his smile does not reach his eyes.

Someone writing for the OBSERVER noted that Ms. Hospital is "one of the best female novelists writing in English." I disagree. She is one of the best novelists writing in English.
Aiata Aiata
This is a challenging book. One needs to linger over the author's words and allow one's imagination to be strung along willingly. If you fight the temptation to speed read, you will discover the prize of her writing skills and the gift of this story. The story evolves through real life and the remembrances of the characters. At times it feels hallucinogenic, but what wouldn't in 120 degree Australian heat and the outback isolation? The story is very unique. There is no need to describe the plot as it is so well discussed in these other reviews. Indeed, the reviews were helpful enough to guide me through the beginning of the book until I got used to the author's rhythm. Eventually, the pieces begin to fit, and just like the unsuspecting visitor, I discover just what the hell is going on with Oyster.