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eBook Immoralist (Modern Classics) ePub

eBook Immoralist (Modern Classics) ePub

by Andre Gide

  • ISBN: 0140014977
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Andre Gide
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Putnam~mass (August 1970)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1210 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1199 kb
  • Other: lit doc rtf azw
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 475

Description

This item:The Immoralist (Penguin Classics) by Andre Gide Paperback . André Paul Guillaume Gide was born in Paris on 22 November 1869. I excuse Gide of such a gross ignorance of Kant and modern philosophy, for it is spoken by Michel his alter ego, a fictional character

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). His father, who died when he was eleven, was Professor of Law at the Sorbonne. I excuse Gide of such a gross ignorance of Kant and modern philosophy, for it is spoken by Michel his alter ego, a fictional character. Michel is not an Übermensch out to cast aside moral conventions and aspire to the belief that God is dead.

The Immoralist (French: L'Immoraliste) is a novel by André Gide, published in France in 1902. The Immoralist is a recollection of events that Michel narrates to his three visiting friends.

Penguin Modern Classics, Paperback, 159 pages. Published December 8th 2011 by Dover Publications. Paperback, 208 pages.

This work is an essential and very beautiful work of modern French literature; it will be read and studied for many ages to come.

Most of the time you are wondering what he actually means. I reached a point of enjoying in others only the wildest behavior, deploring whatever constraint inhibited any excess. This work is an essential and very beautiful work of modern French literature; it will be read and studied for many ages to come. Jun 06, 2007 Kelly rated it liked it.

14. The Immoralist (Modern Classics). 15. The Immoralist (Penguin Classics) (2001).

Sort by: Owned total - Top Rated - Top Rated Popular - Wanted - Recently wanted - Date Added. 14.

Title: The Immoralist (Modern Classics) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Andre Gide, Dorothy Bussy ISBN 10: 0140014977. Publisher: Penguin Classics ISBN 13: 9780140014976. See details and exclusions. See all 11 pre-owned listings.

Series: Penguin Modern Classics. Gide's novel examines the inevitable conflicts that arise when a pleasure seeker challenges conventional society and, without moralizing, it raises complex issues involving the extent of personal responsibility. Alan Sheridan (Introducer). David Watson (Translator). Imprint: Penguin Classics. Published: 04/05/2000.

André Gide - The Immoralist Penguin Modern Classics 1497 Published 1960; reprint 1980 Cover: A detail from van Dongen's 'Les Fellans', in the Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris. Penguin Modern Classics 1497. Published 1960; reprint 1980. Cover: A detail from van Dongen's 'Les Fellans', in the Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris.

On André Gide’s The Immoralist. Andre Gide - writer of beautiful books. Read La Symphonie Pastorale and La Porte Etroite many years ago, and still remember them vividly. Michael Lucey University of California, Berkeley There is an oft-cited sentence in André Gide’s journal entry for March in which he notes: Belle fonction à assumer : celle d’inqu. arl Sagan’s Reading List. He influenced modern literature and arts, inspired various musicians, and prefigured surrealism. French poet Arthur Rimbaud, aged by Étienne Carjat, "probably taken in December. Arthur Rimbaud Postcard. Dolores Delargo Towers - Museum of Camp.

Comments

Ces Ces
Many criticize this book for not have a character that they can invest in, as though it were supposed to be one of those new age adventures into cosmic oneness. But this is precisely the point. It can never transcend itself, given the main character's inability to understand and explain his being as a character in a story.

The publishers of this book chose the title L'Immoraliste for melodramatic reasons, though Michel is not immoral in the strict sense of the term. He does not behave immorally and does not urge others to do so. Sure, he leaves his wife and goes off on his own, but other than being amazed by being in the world, he does not dramatize any of his exploits and always returns to care for his wife. His homosexuality is not described and is only implied.

It is a gross exaggeration of the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, prevalent at the turn of the century, that "Neo-Kantians tried to remain as detached as possible from the troubles of real life and had as much interest in it as the algebraist has for the object of his calculations." I excuse Gide of such a gross ignorance of Kant and modern philosophy, for it is spoken by Michel his alter ego, a fictional character.

Michel is not an Übermensch out to cast aside moral conventions and aspire to the belief that God is dead. Nietzsche above all philosophers would see through this argument as another form of belief system that is not true philosophy. Nietzsche believed that the God of metaphysics is dead, not necessarily the God of the universe of whom we can have no knowledge.

After a long illness that brings him to the brink of death, Michel has an epiphany of being that cannot be explained; it can only be lived. Even his colleagues "...didn't live at all; they were content merely to give the appearance of it; to them life seemed little more than an annoying impediment to their writing.... They give the appearance of living, yet they don't seem to know that they are alive."

All of us who have had the flu or serious illness know how recuperation can be an exhilarating experience, somewhat akin to that felt by R.L. Stevenson's character Dr. Jekyll in becoming Mr. Hyde. We become full of life, energetic, and invincible, knowing that we have beaten a disease and cannot be overcome by it again. But when a loved one contracts the same illness, we feel guilty and obligated, especially when we suspect the person might die in our place. And if the illness lingers for months, we begin to dread the possibility that we may become infected again and suffer the same fate. This accounts for Michel's longing to be outside, to get away from the infected and immoral side of life. In other words, to be amoral.

So, is Michel instead an amoralist? But "amoralist" is not a word, since a person cannot "be" amoral nor do amoral things. This is his dilemma in telling the story to his friends. He is a character without substance, a character of fiction, not really Gide himself, only a creation of the mind, a Zarathustra that cannot really walk a tightrope.

Michel is at a loss in describing his feelings. The reader knows that he is not going to die, being the first-person narrator of the story, so Gide switches the illness to his wife Marceline, who becomes the third person subject to the predicated illness, tuberculosis. Thus, Gide becomes a Kantian after all.

If Michel is not going to die, then who is he other than a man who derives his being from being a patient, a man who draws attention and care from his wife, a man who needs understanding from his friends who hear his story? If this is the immorality in the story, namely, that narrative cannot become transcendent and spiritual but must survive only through the other, then literature is brought to its knees. Herein lies Gide's greatness as a writer.
sergant sergant
Since 1959, subsequent to a lasting and ferocious attack on philosophy, mostly existentialism, and reading many (as in many, many), books, this one superior and outstanding novel has been my FAVORITE book. You can be "inside" the book and look out and see existentialism all around. You can be considering The Immoralist from a distance and immediately bump into existentialism at any moment. The point, here, being that this book compels (demands) one to think. And suddenly you are finding answers about "Who am I?" "What am I doing?" "Is there a better way to direct and be satisfied with my life?" and "Where am I going?" as well as "Are my life's choices worthy, significant, etc.?" I guess The Immoralist is a reminder (wake up call) to seriously consider your CHOICES
Iaiastta Iaiastta
This is a book that has influenced many authors I have read and people I have know...so it was an important read for me. I am sure it was a real shocker for its time...the idea that a person could do whatever they wanted regardless of any perception of acceptable behavior, and act out those narcissitic impulses at any time they felt like it. Many have taken the search for true self and the journey of the narrator as an example, as though actions have no consequences.
But there are indeed consequences, and in the end a path toward a hedonistic existance bares fruit for no one. Beautifully written and a view into the world that this story had an impact on.
It reminded me of that time in the mid to late 1960s, where people felt that they no longer had to be hypocritcal, and that they should impose whatever the felt at any time on all of those around them, regardless if it destroyed relationships or workplace atmospheres. They felt equally that they were being true to themselves; that their rudeness was some how liberating.
The author played with this theme well...many felt that it was a credo...it is after all a novel which asks us to consider things we normally wouldn't consider...and in the end asks us to judge.
Doukree Doukree
The book turned out not what it is expected to be, but not a disappointment. Constantly moving but somehow slow it gives lots of time to think about oneself and values. Selfishness is presented in a completely new way.