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eBook Climate Change: Linking Traditional and Scientific Knowledge ePub

eBook Climate Change: Linking Traditional and Scientific Knowledge ePub

  • ISBN: 0973834218
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Aboriginal Issues Press
  • ePub book: 1581 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1715 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf txt mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
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Description

Climate change is already being experienced in the Arctic with implications for ecosystems and the communities that depend on them

Climate change is already being experienced in the Arctic with implications for ecosystems and the communities that depend on them. This paper argues that an assessment of community vulnerability to climate change requires knowledge of past experience with climate conditions, responses to climatic variations, future climate change projections, and non-climate factors that influence people's susceptibility and adaptive capacity.

The Logic of Scientific Discovery. New York: Basic Books. Contributions of Traditional Knowledge to Understanding Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

Winnipeg, MB: Aboriginal Issues Press. Ohmagari, K. and Berkes, F. 1997. The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Des Offrandes au Système de Quotas: Changements de Statut du Gibier chez les Iglulingmiut de l’Arctique Oriental Canadien. Contributions of Traditional Knowledge to Understanding Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic. Polar Record 37: 315–328. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Indigenous knowledge thus makes an important contribution to climate change policy, and Sustainable Development Goal 13. .

Indigenous knowledge thus makes an important contribution to climate change policy, and Sustainable Development Goal 13 on climate action; by observing changing climates, adapting to impacts and contributing to global mitigation efforts.

4 Traditional climate knowledge and forecasting The subject of traditional knowledge has acquired importance in recent times. Traditional knowledge is generally defined as the knowledge of a people of a particular area based on their interactions and experiences within that area, their traditions, and their incorporation of knowledge emanating from elsewhere into their production and economic systems ( Boef et a. 1993).

Traditional knowledge needs a role in global climate discourse. One significant manifestation of the marginalization of indigenous peoples from the climate change policy and decision-making is the paucity of references in the global climate change discourse to the existing traditional knowledge on climate change. Such international discourse has often failed to consider the valuable insights on direct and indirect impacts, as well as mitigation and adaptation approaches, held by indigenous peoples worldwide.

Chapters, written by indigenous peoples, scientists and development experts, provide insight into how diverse societies observe and adapt to changing environments.

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), also called by other names . Chapter 3. Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Application by Service Scientists . Fish and Wildlife Service.

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), also called by other names including Indigenous Knowledge or Native Science, refers to the evolving knowledge acquired by indigenous and local peoples over hundreds or thousands of years through direct contact with the environment. This book discusses the practical roles in climate change adaptation and conservation that traditional ecological knowledge provides.

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) describes indigenous and other forms of traditional knowledge regarding the sustainability of local resources. As a field of study in anthropology, TEK refers to "a cumulative body of knowledge, belief, and practice, evolving by accumulation of TEK and handed down through generations through traditional songs, stories and beliefs.