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eBook Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling: His Life and Work ePub

eBook Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling: His Life and Work ePub

by Angus Wilson

  • ISBN: 0586049088
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Angus Wilson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; New edition edition (October 11, 1979)
  • Pages: 490
  • ePub book: 1907 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1867 kb
  • Other: mobi lit lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 487

Description

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First, "Strange Ride" is very, very English As noted above this is not always an easy book.

First, "Strange Ride" is very, very English. Some of the references and phrasing are incomprehensible to Americans - or at least this American. Secondly, the author presumes a fair amount of advance knowledge about Kipling by the reader. As noted above this is not always an easy book. I'm not sure I agree, but it is a worthwhile biography about the most important writer of England's latter days of imperial glory.

Rudyard Kipling has remained an enigma despite his work having been read by millions worldwide

Rudyard Kipling has remained an enigma despite his work having been read by millions worldwide. His autobiography revealed little and the "official" biography was heavily censored by his daughter.

Angus Wilson's study of the life and works of Kipling. First, "Strange Ride" is very, very English. Read some of Kipling's stories and poems and a simpler biography of his life before trying this one. Reservations aside, this is an insightful literary biography in which the author derives most of his views from Kipling's own writing.

Carrington, Charles E. Rudyard Kipling: His Life and Works. Rev. ed. London: Macmillan, 1978. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993. The Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling: His Life and Works. New York: Viking, 1977. Rudyard Kipling, Realist and Fabulist. London: Oxford University Press, 1967. Eliot, T. S. A Choice of Kipling’s Verse, Made by T. Eliot, with an Essay on Rudyard Kipling. London: Faber and Faber, 1941. Gilbert, E. Kipling and the Critics. New York: New York University Press, 1965. All fifteen stories in The Jungle Books had their original publication in magazines.

Angus Wilson was born in Sussex, the youngest of six sons, and spent several of his childhood years in South Africa

Angus Wilson was born in Sussex, the youngest of six sons, and spent several of his childhood years in South Africa. A series of odd jobs was followed by a position in the Department of Printed Books in the British Museum, where he worked on replacing as many as possible of the 300,000 books destroyed during the bombing, and later as deputy superintendent of the reading room. In addition to short stories and novels, Wilson wrote Emile Zola: An Introductory Study of His Novels (1952), Tempo: The Impact of Television on the Arts (1966), The Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling (1977), and The World of Charles Dickens (1970).

I want to read this book. The 377th greatest nonfiction book of all time.

Dive deep into Angus Wilson's The Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling with extended . Wilson confronts false or exaggerated charges about Kipling’s life and convictions with hard facts and circumstantial evidence, and misconceptions about.

Rudyard Kipling, man of work, became a kind of Cape Horn against which waves of contradiction dashed ships of literary enterprise. Wilson confronts false or exaggerated charges about Kipling’s life and convictions with hard facts and circumstantial evidence, and misconceptions about his poetry and fiction with judicious reevaluations.

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Comments

Budar Budar
I'll give this biography of Kipling a top rating but with a couple of reservations. First, "Strange Ride" is very, very English. Some of the references and phrasing are incomprehensible to Americans -- or at least this American. It's the old problem of two countries divided by a common language which is really not so common. Secondly, the author presumes a fair amount of advance knowledge about Kipling by the reader. If you think kipling is something the Brits eat for breakfast, you probably won't comprehend this book. Read some of Kipling's stories and poems and a simpler biography of his life before trying this one.

Reservations aside, this is an insightful literary biography in which the author derives most of his views from Kipling's own writing. Rather than focusing on daily events in Kipling's life or a chronology the author is more interested in broad themes. One theme, for example, to which he refers frequently is Kipling's lifelong apprehension about his place in society because he never went to a University or punched the other tickets to acceptance by Victorian society. A second theme is Kipling's interest in children and his own searing experiences as a child. A third is Kipling's concept of duty, "take up the White man's burden--send forth the best ye breed."

The author does some outstanding interpretations of many of Kipling's works, including his masterpiece, "Kim," and stories such as "Dayspring Mishandled" and "The Church that was at Antioch."

Clever and immensely talented, Kipling was also a flawed and incomplete artist which makes him more interesting as a person than the ordinary. He is surely one of the most maligned of all major literary figures, but only Shakespeare has produced more memorable and quotable lines of verse. Probably no other story by any author has had such an impact as "Mowgli's Brothers" from "The Jungle Book." Several movies, the Boy Scouts, and the Tarzan myth all derive from "The Jungle Book."

As noted above this is not always an easy book. The National Review selected "Strange Ride" as one of the top 100 non-fiction books of the 20th century. I'm not sure I agree, but it is a worthwhile biography about the most important writer of England's latter days of imperial glory.

Smallchief
Buridora Buridora
I'll give this biography of Kipling a top rating but with a couple of reservations. First, "Strange Ride" is very, very English. Some of the references and phrasing are incomprehensible to Americans -- or at least this American. It's the old problem of two countries divided by a common language which is really not so common. Secondly, the author presumes a fair amount of advance knowledge about Kipling by the reader. If you think kipling is something the Brits eat for breakfast, you probably won't comprehend this book. Read some of Kipling's stories and poems and a simpler biography of his life before trying this one.

Reservations aside, this is an insightful literary biography in which the author derives most of his views from Kipling's own writing. Rather than focusing on daily events in Kipling's life or a chronology the author is more interested in broad themes. One theme, for example, to which he refers frequently is Kipling's lifelong apprehension about his place in society because he never went to a University or punched the other tickets to acceptance by Victorian society. A second theme is Kipling's interest in children and his own searing experiences as a child. A third is Kipling's concept of duty, "take up the White man's burden--send forth the best ye breed."

The author does some outstanding interpretations of many of Kipling's works, including his masterpiece, "Kim," and stories such as "Dayspring Mishandled" and "The Church that was at Antioch."

Clever and immensely talented, Kipling was also a flawed and incomplete artist which makes him more interesting as a person than the ordinary. He is surely one of the most maligned of all major literary figures, but only Shakespeare has produced more memorable and quotable lines of verse. Probably no other story by any author has had such an impact as "Mowgli's Brothers" from "The Jungle Book." Several movies, the Boy Scouts, and the Tarzan myth all derive from "The Jungle Book."

As noted above this is not always an easy book. The National Review selected "Strange Ride" as one of the top 100 non-fiction books of the 20th century. I'm not sure I agree, but it is a worthwhile biography about the most important writer of England's latter days of imperial glory.

Smallchief