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eBook The Tin Drum ePub

eBook The Tin Drum ePub

by G. Grass

  • ISBN: 0099540657
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: G. Grass
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage Books (2010)
  • ePub book: 1796 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1908 kb
  • Other: mbr docx lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 242

Description

The Tin Drum knows no taboos. Again and again the narrative enters the forbidden sphere where disgust and sexuality, death and blasphemy meet.

The Tin Drum knows no taboos. What differentiates Grass in this respect both from any form of pornography, and from the so-called "stark realism" of the American school, what legitimizes these blunt forays, indeed elevates them to acts of artistic brilliance, is the total objectivity with which he presents them. Unlike Henry Miller, Grass does not seek out taboos; he simply doesn't notice them.

The Tin Drum gives a portrait of a bizarre man in an insane asylum in Germany, who seems to have supernatural .

The Tin Drum gives a portrait of a bizarre man in an insane asylum in Germany, who seems to have supernatural gifts to see through those around him. He is bizarre, grotesque and interesting, but for me the whole tale did not come together as a whole. I found myself waiting for something, but found only one little tale tied weakly to another little tale. While I was reading this book, Günter Grass confessed in an interview that, during the last year of the War, he had served in the Waffen SS. He has always admitted to the fascination that the Nazi party held for young Germans like himself.

GÜNTER GRASS (1927–2015), Germany's most celebrated contemporary writer, attained worldwide renown with the publication of his novel The Tin Drum in 1959.

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). GÜNTER GRASS (1927–2015), Germany's most celebrated contemporary writer, attained worldwide renown with the publication of his novel The Tin Drum in 1959. A man of remarkable versatility, Grass was a poet, playwright, social critic, graphic artist, and novelist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1999.

Gunter Grass’ 1999 Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to him: "whose frolicsome black fables portray the forgotten face of history".

On his third birthday Oskar decides to stop growing  . Gunter Grass’ 1999 Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to him: "whose frolicsome black fables portray the forgotten face of history". Good ole Oskar was living in a period of war, but Grass tells us that the fable of life no matter how dark can always be fun. It’s just a matter of rolling with it. Life’s a hoot ain’t it?.

The Tin Drum (German: Die Blechtrommel) is a 1959 novel by Günter Grass. The novel is the first book of Grass's Danziger Trilogie (Danzig Trilogy)

The Tin Drum (German: Die Blechtrommel) is a 1959 novel by Günter Grass. The novel is the first book of Grass's Danziger Trilogie (Danzig Trilogy). The story revolves around the life of Oskar Matzerath, as narrated by himself when confined in a mental hospital during the years 1952–1954.

Books by Gunter Grass: Dog Years.

Author: G?nter Grass. Acclaimed as the greatest German novel written since the end of World War II, The Tin Drum is the autobiography of thirty-year-old Oskar Matzerath, who has lived through the long Nazi nightmare and who, as the novel begins, is being held in a mental institution. Willfully stunting his growth at three feet for many years, wielding his tin drum and piercing scream as anarchistic weapons, he provides a profound yet hilarious perspective on both German history and the human condition in the modern world. Translated from the German by Ralph Manheim.

The Tin Drum is an outstanding novel written by Gunter Grass. The main character of this novel is Oskar Matzerath, and he has struggled a lot in her life. After his parents died, his life was cut short. Book Details: Book Name: The Tin Drum. Author: Gunter Grass. Translator: Promit Hasan. Genre: Fiction, Classics.

(This is Part 2 of a 2 part Cassette edition) The Tin Drum, one of the great novels of the twentieth century, became a runaway best-seller and catapulted its young author to the forefront of world literature. Now on the book s fiftieth anniversary comes this new translation by Breon Mitchell, one that is faithful to Grass s style and rhythm, restores omissions, and reflects more fully the complexity of the original work. This is the story of Oskar Matzerath, a dwarfish hunchback detained in a mental hospital, convicted of a murder he did not commit. From his third birthday when he received a tin drum, it has become the means of his expression, allowing him to draw forth memories from his past as well as from the Nazi era. Oskar s imaginative distortion and exaggeration of history reveals a startlingly true portrayal of the human situation.

Comments

Golkis Golkis
See the above description for my critique of the book. It is best for adults and college age people to read
Blackseeker Blackseeker
Not as well written as I expected, but interesting subject matter.
Rleyistr Rleyistr
This is one amazing book.
Although before I read it I did not know that the writer has a despicable past and is not a very nice person.
Malara Malara
What an enactment! Gunther Grass is narrating Oskar Matzarat's story, a boy who makes up his mind not to grow when he is three years old, relates life in Dazing, his hometown, with full of unforgettable characters and produces a tour de force. Oskar could hardly wait to get his drum at age three, promised by his mother when he was born. With his drum Oskar can now break glass, be it may church window, his teacher's eye piece or doctor's mason jars by playing the drum or by just his shrill voice.
The story is Nazi history narrated from inside seen thru Oskar's eyes, his alleged father being a party member in good standing. Gunther Grass portrays two events brilliantly, Kristallnacht, killing of innocent Jews and confiscating their property and the second, bold resistance by citizens against all odds to fight the Nazi occupation. Oakar is witness to both the events, first as he walks into his favourite toy store with hordes of drums, to find Sigismund Markus, the owner, murdered and the second, the Resistance, arguably the piece de resistance of the book, at the Polish post office where his other alleged father, Jan Bronski, is holed up with Polish fighters, defending it. After the library is demolished, Bronski along with others surrender and later Oskar finds out he was shot by the Germans.
Oskar relates his biography, as a non-chalance, yet times reluctant, participant to Nazi history unfolding around him. He is there at their victory parades and gruesome defeats, when the Russians occupy Danzig and kill his alleged father Matzerath and when an errant bomb takes the life of his sweatheart, Rosarita.
He confesses his involvment in both their (alleged fathers) murders, Matzerath and Bronski. He had no use for either of them, specially Matzerath, who married his beloved Maria, who begets his son, Kurt!
Oscar is writing his biography inside an asylum with his keeper's help, Bruno, a kind accomodating soul. The book ends with his exoneration from murder charge, but Oskar is not too happy to get out of his safe asylum.
A great allegory of Nazi horrors, a masterpiece.
Oppebro Oppebro
Bear in mind that I haven't yet finished this book. It is written with mastery. That is what kept me reading in the beginning when I wasn't getting a grasp on the story and didn't like the star character. The story is set in Poland during the 2nd World War. The main character, Oskar, is complicated, mysterious and sometimes incredibly obnoxious. It took a while for me to warm up to him. He is innocent and childlike at times and at others incredibly tuned into what's going on around him and is scheming and manipulative, even at a very young age. I'm nearing the end of the book now and look forward to more now. I must say this book doesn't remind me of anything else I've ever read, save possibly A Prayer for Owen Meany and that's only because of the inventiveness of the writer, the depth of the book and the wartime setting. If you liked A Prayer for Owen Meany I suspect you will like this as well. I'm tired of murder mysteries. I look for good stories. This is a great story. I will read other books by Gunter Grass.
Water Water
The Tin Drum gives a portrait of a bizarre man in an insane asylum in Germany, who seems to have supernatural gifts to see through those around him. He is bizarre, grotesque and interesting, but for me the whole tale did not come together as a whole. I found myself waiting for something, but found only one little tale tied weakly to another little tale. Each were interesting, and just a little out of whack, but never came together as a whole. I'm glad that I read this portrait of Germany around WWII, but sadly, I'm glad I'm finished.
spark spark
I saw the movie years ago and after having lived in Germany for 7 years prior.
You have to live among the people of a country who have never befriended an American before. The wonder and often simple but yet intellectual beauty of small dorf ( small town) people was amazing . I can understand the life of the people who lived in such times from my older landlord who always shred a case of very expensive wine he bought at Christmastime with others. One year when my German was good enough, I asked why he did that. He would laugh and say” money comes from a Russian!” I later learned it was annual funds for the horrific bayonet scar he had from forehead to chin across his face.
To explain the life and minds of people of that time can only come from such a translation of “The Tin Drum”...... I was so glad to have this more adequate translation and now will seek out the German film again to see how it was brought to the screen by people who may have lived through such a time....
A fantasy, difficult to fathom, unique, perplexing.