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eBook Night Falls On The City: The Lost Masterpiece of Wartime Vienna ePub

eBook Night Falls On The City: The Lost Masterpiece of Wartime Vienna ePub

by Sarah Gainham

  • ISBN: 0349000336
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Sarah Gainham
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Abacus; 2000 edition (2001)
  • ePub book: 1662 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1929 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 758

Description

This is the first book of the Vienna Trilogy, a work of historical fiction which chronicles the lives and struggles .

This is the first book of the Vienna Trilogy, a work of historical fiction which chronicles the lives and struggles of a group of characters connected with the Austrian National Theater (the Burgtheater) immediately before, during and after WWII. Given the spate of overly sentimentalized new historical fiction set in WWII, I found Night Falls on the City to be refreshingly clear any romanticization or magical realism. This is realistic fiction at its best.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).

A highly acclaimed bestseller when first published in the 1960s, Night Falls on the City is a true lost classic, and an unforgettable portrait of wartime.

Beautiful actress Julia Homburg and her politician husband Franz Wedeker embody all the enlightened brilliance of their native city. When the SS invades and disappearances become routine, Franz must be concealed. With daring ingenuity, Julia conjures a hiding place. A highly acclaimed bestseller when first published in the 1960s, Night Falls on the City is a true lost classic, and an unforgettable portrait of wartime. Sarah Gainham was born in London in 1915.

The gripping lost masterpiece novel of wartime Vienna. She moved to Germany in her early thirties, shortly after WWII, and then to Austria, where she remained for over fifty years. It is in central Europe that her early thrillers such as Cold Dark Night, The Stone Roses and Silent Hostage are played out. Night Falls on the City was first published to worldwide acclaim in 1967. She later wrote two further novels set in Vienna, A Place in the Country and Private Worlds. Gainham reported regularly on central European affairs for the Spectator, Encounter and the New Republic. She died in Austria in 1999.

The Lost Masterpiece of Wartime Vienna.

Sarah Gainham was born in London in 1915. She moved to Germany in her early thirties, shortly after the Second World War, and then to Austria, where she remained for over fifty years, working as a novelist and journalist. It is in central Europe that Gainham's early thrillers such as Cold Dark Night, The Stone Roses and Silent Hostage are played out. In 1967 she published Night Falls on the City, her masterpiece novel set in wartime Vienna; it received international acclaim and spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list

HIGHLY acclaimed when first published in 1967, the work remains a gripping masterpiece of wartime Vienna. This gripping and suspenseful psychological thriller is also a sociological analysis of a city under the stress of a totalitarian regime.

HIGHLY acclaimed when first published in 1967, the work remains a gripping masterpiece of wartime Vienna. Originally published asNight Falls in the City.

Hmm, my first thought was, a novel, decorated stories. About such a topic? Sniffy me. Second thought came hot upon: where would we be without the novel? Of course there is history-records, recollections, experiences-all essential bones of the past-but what puts the flesh on those bones and makes them again a living body? Narrative: song and story. Characters that speak and weep. Genre: Fiction & Related Items, Modern & Contemporary Fiction (post C 1945).

Night Falls on the City Vienna, 1938. Beautiful actress Julia Homburg and her politician husband Franz Wedeker embody all the enlightened brilliance of their native city. But Wedeker is Jewish, and just across the border the tanks of the Nazi Reich are primed for the Anschluss. When the SS invades and disappearances become routine, Franz must be concealed. With daring ingenuity, Julia conjures a hiding place. In the shad...

Comments

Very Old Chap Very Old Chap
i found this book by chance while looking throu the kindle lists. I read a summary,and found the style and the content of the highest quality.
The story is so tense but also very realistic and you feel a part of the scene; Historically,it was fascinating to be within the city of Vienna and see it and its population slowly crumble under the pressure of change.
There was a feeling of a play within a play by using a theatre company as the central characters.
I do not often want to read a book again but this one I will because there are so many nuances,easily missed at a first reading
Manona Manona
was a bit disappointed in this book, it was a bit slow getting into the story, was okay, wouldn't rave about it though
Blueshaper Blueshaper
A ‘one size fits all” book review? You decide. In recent months I have somehow (certainly not on purpose) been immersed in books related, more or less to the Holocaust. The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult; In A Dark Wood by Marcel Moring; Emperor of Lies by Sem-Sandberg; By the Rivers of Babylon by Nelson DeMille; Night Falls On The City by Sarah Gainham, to name a few that stick in my mind. The plot, the characters, the story line, the locale all vary from book to book, but the Holocaust underlies them all.
Central to this underlying theme is the incredible suffering of Jews during World War II, at the hands of the Nazis, the Austrians, the French, the Poles, the Russians, pick a nationality of your choice.
A Tunisian acquaintance once asked me if I believed in the Holocaust. My initial answer was trite “What’s not to believe?” Then he said “But 6 million dead?” I opined I would probably be more comfortable with 5, 978,612 since I’ve always been a bit leery of round numbers. Then I added “What difference does it make? 500,000, 2,000,000, 4,000,000, 6,000,000? It is not the numbers that are important, it is the fact. If you don’t like the numbers, make up your own, but you cannot reasonably deny the fact that it happened. In so many villages, towns, farms, cities, countries – there is just no room for denial.
Each of these books – novels, I admit – goes to the very heart of this and to read even one should be sufficient to erase any doubt.
And no, before you ask, I’m not Jewish. I would even admit that, from time to time I tire of reading about it. And yet I realize full well that the story must be told over and over lest we forget. I only regret there has been no such outcry and continuing reminders about Cambodia in the 1970’s.
Be careful; this book, and all the others mentioned, are worth reading. But don’t read them in a short time span. I have found myself becoming too complacent about the subject matter. Space them out so that the message continues to reverberate over years and not just months. And realize that you will never understand what Israel is all about and what it means in today’s world until you have done so.
Malanim Malanim
*spoilers

This is an exceptionally well-researched book about the Nazi annexation of Austria that drives home the real horror and inhumanity of this era. It is a story of great suffering and the compromises that people are forced to make in such terrible circumstances when they are pitted against each other by a regime that relies on fear and paranoia for its survival. It's hard to believe that Hitler was greeted with cheering crowds when he first crossed the border despite the fact that the Nazi's were crushing all opposition, arresting thousands and establishing a police state. It stands as a timely reminder of the futility of attempting to compromise with fascists.

The story centers around celebrated actress Julia Homburg who must hide her Jewish, socialist husband Franz when his attempt to leave Vienna fails. The book follows her efforts to keep him safe in their apartment while the city goes to pieces around them. Julia is a well-drawn character but Franz basically just fades into the background as Julia goes on with her life outside without him. From the moment he returns to the apartment after leaping from a train to escape the SS, he is a changed man, frightened and vulnerable, and this weakness is reinforced through his physical deterioration. Julia's love for him changes too and she loses all physical desire for him and takes another lover.

This was the weakest part of the story for me because I couldn't understand why Franz was portrayed in this way. Just because he was physically isolated from the world, I couldn't accept that he would so quickly lose his vitality and strength, or that his thoughts and conversations with Julia would not even be worth including, especially considering his political background. The other issue I had with the book was its length. Although I appreciate how detailed it is, it was a struggle to get to the end and I never quite managed to get all of the different characters straight.

I'm giving it four stars because despite its flaws I believe it is one of the best novels about WWII ever written, providing an almost visceral experience at times of what it was like to be caught in the madness of war-time Vienna.
Pettalo Pettalo
I was delighted to see this re released after so many years. This is a wonderful book which I first read in the 1960s. The characters are so real that when I visited Vienna shortly after reading it I expected to see Julia and her friends everywhere I went. Sarah Gainham was a central European correspondent for The Spectator for years and she had an intimate knowledge of life, society and customs in post war German speaking Central Europe, where many of her books are set. This is probably the greatest of them, and I really hope the sequels "A Place in the Country" and "Private Worlds" are also republished. Anyone who meets Julia will want to read the story to the end of the third volume. Although these are works of fiction Gainham said she frequently met people who insisted that they had known Julia Homburg- that should give you some idea of just how real is the world she recreated. This is a book in which the reader becomes completely absorbed.