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eBook Complete Stories ePub

eBook Complete Stories ePub

by Flannery O'Connor

  • ISBN: 0571245781
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Flannery O'Connor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; 1St Edition edition (2009)
  • ePub book: 1758 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1710 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 570

Description

Her Complete Stories, published posthumously in 1972, won the National Book Award that year, and in a. .Ever since I came upon "The Complete Stories of Flannery O'Connor" (while serving in the military overseas) this collection has been an integral part of my life.

Her Complete Stories, published posthumously in 1972, won the National Book Award that year, and in a 2009 online poll it was voted as the best book to have won the award in the contest's 60-year history. Her essays were published in Mystery and Manners and her letters in The Habit of Being.

The Complete Short Stories Flannery O’Connor CONTENTS The Geranium The Barber Wildcat The Crop The Turkey . Right below us three floors down.

The Complete Short Stories Flannery O’Connor CONTENTS The Geranium The Barber Wildcat The Crop The Turkey The Train The Peeler The Heart of the Park . Old Dudley was always afraid that when he went out in the dog runs, a door would suddenly open and one of the snipe-nosed men that hung off the window ledges in his undershirt would growl, What are you doing here? The door to the nigger’s apartment was open and he could see a woman sitting in a chair by the window. Yankee niggers, he muttered. She had on rimless glasses and there was a book in her lap.

The Complete Stories book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Complete Stories. by. Flannery O'Connor

Mary Flannery O'Connor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American novelist, short story writer and essayist.

Mary Flannery O'Connor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American novelist, short story writer and essayist. She was a Southern writer who often wrote in a sardonic Southern Gothic style and relied heavily on regional settings and grotesque characters, often in violent situations.

Freeman had two others, forward and reverse, that she used for all her human dealings. Her forward expression was steady and driving like the advance of a heavy truck. Her eyes never swerved to left.

The complete stories. Contents: Introduction by Robert Giroux. Flannery O’Connor’s first book has never, up to now, been published. It was entitled The Geranium: A Collection of Short Stories and consists of the first six stories in this volume

The complete stories. It was entitled The Geranium: A Collection of Short Stories and consists of the first six stories in this volume. The title page of the original manuscript, in the library of the University of Iowa, bears the legend, A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Fine Arts, in the Department of English, in the Graduate College of the State University of Iowa. It is dated June 1947 and a separate page carries a dedication to her teacher, Paul Engle.

Flannery O’Connor was a master of the short story. Admittedly, her stories are not for everyone, but if you like her work, even the longest ones are well worth reading. There’s a short teaser for each story.

Flannery O'Connor was born in Savannah, Georgia, in 1925. Her Complete Stories, published posthumously in 1972, won the National Book Award that year, and in a 2009 online poll it was voted as the best book to have won the award in the contest’s 60-year history. When she died at the age of thirty-nine, America lost one of its most gifted writers at the height. Her essays were published in Mystery and Manners (1969) and her letters in The Habit of Being (1979). In 1988 the Library of America published her Collected Works; she was the first postwar writer to be so honored.

The publication of this extraordinary volume firmly established Flannery O'Connor's monumental contribution to American fiction. There are thirty-one stories here in all, including twelve that do not appear in the only two story collections O'Connor put together in her short lifetime - Everything That Rises Must Converge and A Good Man Is Hard to Find. O'Connor published her first story, "The Geranium, " in 1946 while she was working on her master's degree at the University of Iowa.

Winner of the National Book Award The publication of this extraordinary volume firmly established Flannery O'Connor's monumental contribution to American fiction

Winner of the National Book Award The publication of this extraordinary volume firmly established Flannery O'Connor's monumental contribution to American fiction. There are thirty-one stories here in all, including twelve that do not appear in the only two story collections O'Connor put together in her short lifetime-Everything That Rises Must ConvergeandA Good Man Is Hard to Find. O'Connor published her first story, "The Geranium," in 1946, while she was working on her master's degree at the University of Iowa.

Complete Stories

Comments

Nayatol Nayatol
Either you adore her work or you hate it. For me, she is the favorite of all favorites. Dark and bizarre but at the same time hilariously funny. There is no author I have re-read as much. As weird as the characters are, I can see myself in most of them.
Shaktiktilar Shaktiktilar
This is an excellent, wide ranging collection of short stories. There are so many really excellent and entertaining short stories in this work, I hardly know where to begin. It amazes me that Flannery O'Connor is not placed among the very top of American authors. But in truth, i almost never hear anyone mention her name.

I am somewhat embarrassed to admit I was unfamiliar with Flannery O'Connor until the last few years. I attribute this to the fact that she is not discussed contemporaneously with other American iconic authors. I first heard of her when I was studying a book on literature by Harold Bloom and he discussed her work. I had begun reading work by William Faulkner and at first was unsettled by his style. Slowly I have begun to gain an appreciation the genre of "Southern Gothic". Flannery O'Connor has her own style which includes, but is not limited to Southern Gothic.

Flannery O'Connor has a wry sense of ironic humor which manifests itself throughout her work and can suddenly emerge out of nowhere and surprise the reader. An example of this is the short story "The Crop". At the same time some of her short stories stun me with their violence. Sometimes the two combine as at the end of "A Good Man is Hard to Find". I am not learned enough to know where to place Flannery O'Connor compared to other Southern Gothic authors, but she may be my favorite, with Harper Lee and Carson McCullers close behind.
Kashicage Kashicage
Ever since I came upon "The Complete Stories of Flannery O'Connor" (while serving in the military overseas) this collection has been an integral part of my life. All of the stories have something of value in them, even the weaker ones; but an attentive reading of the best ones will leave an indelible impression: for example, "A Good Man Is Hard to Find", "Good Country People", "A View of the Woods", "The Enduring Chill", "Revelation". Some readers find O'Connor's fiction depressing but I do not. I never have. I enjoy these stories, savor them and return to them again and again. An important point to consider is that O'Connor's characters are usually damnable but are rarely, if ever, actually damned. A theology of hope-for-all permeates her fiction.

Of all these stories, I think it's "The Displaced Person" that pleases me most. Its length is less than a novel but it has about it the moral, historical and spiritual proportions of a great epic. Its ironic rendering of human folly and ignorance comes across with patient objectivity and humor, and so free of contempt as to seem miraculous. It's a rare writer who can portray such rustic or insufferable characters so believably on the one hand; but on the other, free of the taint of hatred or even condescension.
Sagda Sagda
The greatest accomplishment of O'Connor's writing is that she makes you think. She begs you to look inside yourself as you read her stories and ask yourself hard questions IF you dare or are brave enough. Am I like that? Have I done that or said that or thought like that??? Then she asks you to destroy that wrong thinking. A great author with a deeply intellectual and spiritual mind that shows so clearly in these Simple Stories about life.
Gela Gela
So . . . how am I going to summarize over 30 short stories in one volume that run the gamut (what is a gamut anyway) of highly disturbing to deeply inspiring to truly annoying? Since Flannery O'Connor is in that "classic" category and I am not a literary critic, here is my advice to fellow "regular guy (or girl)" readers:

You can't make it through this volume without taking breaks away from this book. I plowed through half of it and that was too much. I had to go to Colorado and drive back home to New Jersey with my family to get it out of my head. So I would suggest alternating these stories with lighter fare, or trips to Colorado if you can.

The second half was easier for me . . . I think maybe because Flannery doesn't seem to kill off all of her characters in the second half . . .

The single story "Revelation" was worth all of the time I spent on this book. My second favorite was . . . oops . . . Amazon won't let me print the title . . .

I got this book out of my interest in Southern history and culture. What I got from it was incredibly deep, affecting, surreal yet crudely realistic portrayals of people in all of their hypocritical, self deceptive, self destructive, self righteous, vulgar, and funny ways. I didn't know people could write like this . . . or this well.
Endieyab Endieyab
Flannery O'Connor writes telling vignettes with conviction and religious fervor. She tells tales of the consequences of small minds—minds who would institutionalize their prejudice to insulate their world in a limited reality. This collection of her best short stories will stick with you. Her characters are uncanny and their world described with excruciating detail. My fear that her works might be avoided or censored in our politically correct society due to her language, was affirmed when amazon censored my previous review. Words shock. Racism shocked and angered Flannery, and her words pass along that distaste of prejudice to the reader. The title of my favorite piece—sanitized through a P.C. filter— would be called "The Artificial African-American", and not have the same impact that Miss O'Connor intended.