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eBook THE BROKEN SWORD ePub

eBook THE BROKEN SWORD ePub

by Poul Anderson

  • ISBN: 034531171X
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Poul Anderson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Del Rey (April 12, 1983)
  • ePub book: 1192 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1729 kb
  • Other: azw lit lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 724

Description

The Broken Sword is a fantasy novel by American writer Poul Anderson, originally published in 1954.

The Broken Sword is a fantasy novel by American writer Poul Anderson, originally published in 1954. The original text was returned to print by Gollancz in 2002. The book tells the story of Skafloc, elven-fosterling and originally son of Orm the Strong. The story begins with the marriage of Orm the Strong and Aelfrida of the English

Published in 1954, Poul Anderson’s The Broken Sword is one of the forgotten giants of early modern fantasy. The book remains an astounding influence of several important writers in the genre.

Published in 1954, Poul Anderson’s The Broken Sword is one of the forgotten giants of early modern fantasy.

Freda did not weep, but she felt the unshed tears thick in her throat. You think this is dawn for us, she said once, the second day. I tell you it is night. He looked at her, puzzled ean you?. The sword is full of wickedness. The deed we go to do is wrong. No good can come of i. .He laid his hands on her shoulders. I understand you do not like making your kin travel the troublous road, he said. Nor do I. Yet who else among the dead will help and not harm us? Stay here, Freda, if you cannot bear it.

Anderson Poul Читать онлайн The Broken Sword.

The Broken Sword Poul Anderson Foreword Late in the year of Our Lord 1018, Sighvat Thordarson fared through Gotaland on an errand for King Olaf of Norway. Most folk thereabouts still worshipped in the old way. The wife at one lonely steading would not let him and his friends spend the night because an Aljarblot was being readied. Any well-brought-up man in those days could make a stave at any time; and Sighvat was a skald. Читать онлайн The Broken Sword. Late in the year of Our Lord 1018, Sighvat Thordarson fared through Gotaland on an errand for King Olaf of Norway.

'Poul Anderson's classic fantasy, The Broken Sword, knocks The Fellowship of the Ring into a cocked ha. ' . Back in 1954, Poul Anderson released his novel The Broken Sword. ' - -Guardian (UK). Not many have heard of it because a little book came out that year took all the spotligh. ome book called The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring.

Poul Anderson's classic fantasy, The Broken Sword, knocks The Fellowship of the Ring into a cocked hat, says . Two similar books were published in 1954. The first, in the US, was Poul Anderson's The Broken Sword. The second, in the UK, was JRR Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring.

Poul Anderson's classic fantasy, The Broken Sword, knocks The Fellowship of the Ring into a cocked hat, says Michael Moorcock. Both these romances drew on familiar Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon sources, but Anderson's was somewhat closer to its origins, a fast-paced doom-drenched tragedy in which human heroism, love and ambition, manipulated by amoral gods, elves and trolls, led inevitably to tragic consequences.

The Broken Sword Fantasy Masterworks: Book 32 . The sword Tyrfing has been broken to prevent it striking at the roots of Yggdrasil, the great tree that binds earth, heaven and hell together. Three Hearts and Three Lions Fantasy Masterworks: Book 40 .

Poul Anderson was an American science fiction author who began his career during one o.There's a great sale on Poul Anderson titles today (1/13), via the Early Bird Books newsletter.

Poul Anderson here tells a wonderful tale, full of magic, adventure and peril. The Broken Sword is a beautifully told, violent and epic, fantasy story

Poul Anderson here tells a wonderful tale, full of magic, adventure and peril. It blazes forth at a blistering pace, yet still manages to include sufficient characterization. The Broken Sword is a beautifully told, violent and epic, fantasy story. Set in a Norse/ Scandinavian Myth landscape, with Elves and Dwarves etc; The Broken Sword draws upon similar caricatures as Tolkein's Lord of the Rings.

The Broken Sword - Poul Anderson. Most critics characterize The Broken Sword as an homage to the Northern thing, as W. H. Auden called his own fascination with the Icelandic sagas and Norse Eddas. A character named Audun actually appears in the novel. Introduction by Michael Dirda. Perhaps the finest American heroic fantasy-so E. F. Bleiler, the great scholar of supernatural and fantasy literature, summed up The Broken Sword. But this simple label isn’t quite right. Yes, overall the book may be, to borrow Tolkien’s words about Beowulf, a drink dark and bitter; a solemn funeral-ale with the taste of death.

Thor has broken the sword Tyrfing so that it cannot strike at the roots of Yggdrasil, the tree that binds together earth, heaven and hell. But now the mighty sword is needed again to save the elves in their war against the trolls, and only Scafloc, a human child kidnapped and raised by the elves, can hope to persuade Bolverk the ice-giant to make Tyrfing whole again. But Scafloc must also confront his shadow self, Valgard the changeling who has taken his place in the world of men.

Comments

Kata Kata
I fell in love with JRR Tolkien in the mid-1960s. I've read many imitators, but not until reading this book did I find his equal. The book was published in 1954, 10 years before I read Tolkien. I don't know whether the two ever met or corresponded, and one is definitely not imitating the other. Instead, they both drank deeply of the same sources: the Norse eddas, and fashioned a contemporary version of that intoxicating draft. Tolkien has a softer, gentler approach to the source material. Anderson is harsher and sharper. Of the two, IMHO Anderson is closer to the originals.

If you like Tolkien and want to read someone who belongs on the same shelf by right of his own merit and isn't a poor imitation, I recommend this book highly.
Kifer Kifer
The Broken SwordA fantastic tale that lays the foundation of cursed swords, brave warriors, cruel scheming gods, events set in motion that take generations to play out! In modern hands, this would take twelve volumes to craft and not be half so powerful in its action and consequences!

The Broken Sword brings ancient prophecies, changeling children, cursed swords, elves the likes of which modern authors shy away from in favor of crafting long lived humans who are good with bows, ancient deities whose time passes but has not yet passed! The legends of Ireland fight alongside those of the Norse, the shores of England soak up the blood of hundreds if not thousands!

If you want to see where so much of fantasy afterward has drawn its strengths from, from Elric's cursed rune blade to the themes of gods playing in the lives of mortals, to the sins of incest and the clash of taboos, The Broken Sword is a must read.
Anayaron Anayaron
I read this book years ago and was underwhelmed. I returned to it when I found out there were two versions, one published in 1957 and another, updated version published circa 1971 or so. The Gollancz version, which is what I am praising here, is the '57 version; which is in my humble opinion a much superior story. This is a interesting fusion of Viking Saga and Fantasy novel, and it's very well done. If you read the '71 version and didn't like it, give this version a shot, it is very, very, good!
Fordrelis Fordrelis
The broken sword had the incredibly lyrical and exciting language that you can expect from Poul Anderson. The parallel lands of medieval England and Fairie were beautifully etched and the plot was complex and engaging.
My only problem with this book was the violence. It was as vividly described as the landscapes, characters emotions, and physical world. There are parts of this that I had to read aloud to friends because the language was so beautiful. And then, there were parts that were so violent I had to skip over them. If you don't mind gore, violent battles, and occasional lust, you will love this book.
Gavinrage Gavinrage
A dark fantasy tragedy, this is a classic. Elfs vs trolls as pawns of the gods, a doomed love story, a demon sword - what's not to like?
Golden Lama Golden Lama
I picked this up because it was mentioned in Gary Gygax's famous "Appendix N" - the books and stories that inspired the creation of Dungeons & Dragons, besides which it is written in a style similar to the Norse sagas, which I very much enjoy. Anderson skillfully blended history, sword-and-sorcery fantasy, elements of Norse, Celtic, a medieval Christian mythology, folktales elements, and more to create a brilliant fantasy story!
Tojahn Tojahn
Poul Anderson's The Broken Sword is a fantasy tale in the style of Tolkien with a full cavalcade of elves, trolls,and dwarves. For unclear reasons, a high ranking elf decides to make an elf / troll hybrid and substitute that infant for a human child that he then proceeds to raise. Conveniently as a baby shower gift, a powerful, but broken sword is offered that is hidden away. The hybrid grows up to be a problem child and after killing most of his "family" goes on to align himself with trolls with the intention of wiping out the elves. Meanwhile, the human child is raised as an elf with some rudimentary magical powers. These opposites eventually square off against one another following a side quest of getting the broken sword fixed. A bit of accidental incest is cleaned up Odin.

Amid the blood and gore of many battles, along with many brutal murders, there are plenty of other creatures with cameo roles plus some mediocre poetry. This is a tale for hardcore fans of the Tolkien fantasy genre.
I loved reading this short novel. It is a dense, beautifully written novel that moves along at breakneck speed. I doubt it is hyperbole to say more happens in this novel than in the first two books of the LOTR combined. It is a very violent novel and has all the machinations of a Greek tragedy. It is, at its core, a love story, but far from conventional. To reveal too much would ruin the surprises throughout. But be warned. This is not your typical fantasy novel. It is not written where it takes whole chapters to describe a single event. When I say it moves fast, I mean it moves FAST.

There are epic battles throughout, love gained and lost, great quests and, of course, great tragedy. It has everything.

I think it is the finest fantasy novel I have ever read. I had no idea Poul Anderson could write so beautifully. I have read some of his other novels and while I enjoyed them, it was never because of his writing. In fact, I had thought him a very average writer but who had some fascinating ideas. Now I know better.

My only criticism is that it ended.

Highest recommendation!