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eBook Japanese high seas fleet (Ballantine's illustrated history of the violent century. Weapons book No. 33) ePub

eBook Japanese high seas fleet (Ballantine's illustrated history of the violent century. Weapons book No. 33) ePub

by Richard Humble

  • ISBN: 034523426X
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Richard Humble
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (1973)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1283 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1489 kb
  • Other: lrf azw lit docx
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 563

Description

As short as this book is (only 160 pages) "Japanese High Seas Fleet" by Richard Humble covers a great deal of ground.

As short as this book is (only 160 pages) "Japanese High Seas Fleet" by Richard Humble covers a great deal of ground. Starting with The Meiji Reforms of 1867-1868, the book presents the social context of the nation of Japan as the country moved toward the crucial Russo-Japanese War of 1904. The famous naval battle off the Korean peninsula near Tsushima in that war of 1904 made a national hero of Admiral Heihachiro Togo and created a strong impulse in the Japanese public for a strong navy.

Japanese High Seas Fleet book. Start by marking Japanese High Seas Fleet (Ballantine's Illustrated History of the Violent Century: Weapons book No. 33) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Japanese High Seas Fleet (History of 2nd World War). Book Description Paperback. A readable copy of the book which may include some defects such as highlighting and notes. Cover and pages may be creased and show discolouration. ISBN 10: 0330241044 ISBN 13: 9780330241045. Seller Inventory GOR002142268.

Japanese High Seas Fleet. Book in the Ballantine's Illustrated History of World War II, the Violent Century: Weapons Book Series). Select Format: Paperback.

Japanese High Seas Fleet (Ballantine’s Illustrated History of the Violet Century and World War II, Weapons Book, No. 33. I found the information that I needed right away from one of the over 10,000 free articles that you provide as a public service. 33). + From Source. THE ACADEMY LIBRARY This publication is not yet a part of our library collection. I'm surprised that so much if this site is free.

Find nearly any book by RICHARD HUMBLE

Find nearly any book by RICHARD HUMBLE. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Japanese High Seas Fleet (Ballantine's Illustrated History of the Violet Century and World War II, Weapons Book, No. 33): ISBN 9780330241045 (978-0-330-24104-5) Softcover, Pan Macmillan, 1974. Ships: Sailors and the Sea (Timelines Series). ISBN 9780531152867 (978-0-531-15286-7) Softcover, Franklin Watts, 1996. Find signed collectible books: 'Ships: Sailors and the Sea (Timelines Series)'.

Did you scroll all this way to get facts about history of the fleet? Well you're in luck, because here they come. The most common history of the fleet material is fleece. The most popular color? You guessed it: black.

Ballantine Illustrated History of a Violent Century. Japanese High Seas Fleet by Richard Humble. Book No 1 Opening Moves by John Keegan. Book No 2 Trench Fighting 1914-18 by Charles Messenger. Cassino by Dominich Graham. Chindits: Long Range Penetration by Michael Calvert. Condor Legion by Peter Elstob. Book No 4 Tanganyikan Guerrilla: East African Campaign 1914-18 by . Pan/Ballantine Illustrated History of World War II. Battle books. Bir Hacheim: Desert Citadel by Richard Holmes.

Book about Japanese World War II ships

Comments

Efmprof Efmprof
Excellent condition!
Tiv Tiv
Well Illustrated , a very handy guide book for naval modellers and gamers.
Yayrel Yayrel
McDonald Publishing and the Imperial War Museum teamed up back in the late 1960s and early 1970s to publish this tight series of illustrated paperbacks on the history of World War I, World War II (and a few other conflicts of the 20th century), which were picked up by Ballantine in the United States. They were all divided into subjects: battles, campaigns, weapons, war leaders, politics in action, human conflict, and regalia, by color bands on the bottom, enjoying common editing and artwork, and a fairly common collection of well-known historians. They cost $1 at the time (a good deal of money) and a lot more now (being out of print).

The series as a whole is slightly outdated by the disclosures from Allied codebreaking, and suffered from being whipped together in a hurry, but they remain then and now a fine introduction to conflict in the 20th century -- if you can find them.

This particular entry covers the Imperial Japanese Navy, from its emergence on the world stage in the Russo-Japanese war, to its final destruction at the close of World War II. In 175 pages, that's a lot of ocean to cover, but Richard Humble does a very fine job of it. He discusses a great deal of historical material that most students of World War II history are quite familiar with -- Pearl Harbor, Coral Sea, Midway, Guadalcanal, the Philippine Sea, and Leyte, finishing up with the Imperial Navy's proudest and most powerful ships trapped in their harbors, often as bombed wrecks, except for the battleship Yamato, which sails to her well-documents, extremely tragic, and highly wasteful (in terms of lives) demise. Given the Japanese psyche, that was the only fate she could meet.

The most important points Mr. Humble makes are how the Japanese Navy quickly rose from non-existence to world-class power, and just as quickly declined almost to insignificance, because of its inability to replace losses (both men and material) and the Japanese economy's inability to provide warships with fuel, in the face of ever-growing Anglo-American numbers, equipment, and technical proficiency. By 1945, the Japanese had gleaming new aircraft carriers that lacked airmen and surface ships that lacked fuel, making them useless.

The Japanese also suffered from fatal weaknesses in the brain -- repeatedly making the same mistakes, devising elaborate plans that relied on decoy forces and the Americans doing exactly what the Japanese wanted them to do, and an inability to adjust and be flexible when things when the wrong way. At Savo and Samar, Japanese admirals withdrew with the enemy at their mercy, for example.

The history of the Imperial Japanese Navy is a tragedy in many ways -- a gigantic waste of men, resources, energy, and spirit, and its main saving grace is that the warriors of that navy acquitted themselves in battle in the best samurai traditions of the Empire, often going down with their ships.

Richard Humble writes a fine introduction to this story -- there are other, larger books, which flesh this history out in full -- and the maps and illustrations are excellent. If you want to begin studying the history of the Imperial Japanese Navy, this is the best place to start.

As for me...there is one photograph in the book that haunts me. It's a postwar shot of the sunken hulk of the battleship Ise, listing to starboard, hammered by more than 11 bombs on July 28, 1945. She leans over to starboard, looking forlorn, embarrassed, and powerful at the same time, the helpless ghost of a once-powerful navy.
Arcanefist Arcanefist
As short as this book is (only 160 pages) "Japanese High Seas Fleet" by Richard Humble covers a great deal of ground. Starting with The Meiji Reforms of 1867-1868, the book presents the social context of the nation of Japan as the country moved toward the crucial Russo-Japanese War of 1904. The famous naval battle off the Korean peninsula near Tsushima in that war of 1904 made a national hero of Admiral Heihachiro Togo and created a strong impulse in the Japanese public for a strong navy. This pursuit of a strong navy caused Japan to actively engage in an naval arms race with Britain and the United States in the 1920s. The navy that was created and enlarged during this time came to have strong doubts about the any war with the Western Powers. This put them at odds with the Japanese Army and General Hideki Tojo, who would become Japan's famous wartime Prime Minister in October of 1941. This Japanese Army/Navy conflict is portrayed accurately in the 1970 movie "Tora Tora Tora." However, it was the navy that was tasked with the job of winning the war that the navy felt could not be won. Thus, the navy--particularly Admiral Isokoru Yamamoto came up with the extremely risky strategy of a sneak attack on Pearl Harbor as the only way to win the war. After the battle of Midway in June of 1942, Humble's book tapers off quite quickly. This was for good reason. By 1943, all the great Japanese aircraft carriers were gone and in another year much of the rest of the Japanese surface fleet was gone.
Nern Nern
Another in along line of Ballentine books form the 1970's. The book is less the 175 pages but is packed with alot of information about the Japanese Fleet of WW2 . If you can find a copy it is worth a read and the drwaing and photo's are a great help.