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eBook America's coming-of-age ePub

eBook America's coming-of-age ePub

by Van Wyck Brooks

  • ISBN: 0374909962
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Van Wyck Brooks
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Octagon Books (1975)
  • ePub book: 1901 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1700 kb
  • Other: rtf mobi doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 662

Description

America's Coming Of Age book. Van Wyck Brooks was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, on February 16, 1886.

America's Coming Of Age book. His parents, Sally and Charles Brooks were well off, and as a result Van Wyck was able to get a good primary education. Van Wyck eventually ended up in Harvard University, from where he graduated in 1908.

1915: America's Coming of Age. 1920: The Ordeal of Mark Twain. 1953: The Writer in America. 1954: Scenes and Portraits: Memoirs of Childhood and Youth (An Autobiography). 1955: John Sloan: A Painter's Life.

Portrait of Van Wyck Brooks by John Butler Yeats, 1909. Van Wyck Brooks (February 16, 1886 in Plainfield, New Jersey – May 2, 1963 in Bridgewater, Connecticut) was an American literary critic, biographer, and historian. 1915: America's Coming of Age. 1925: The Pilgrimage of Henry James. 1925: Henry Thoreau, Bachelor of Nature (by Leon Bazalgette, translated by Van Wyck Brooks).

America's Coming-Of-Age has been added to your Cart. By the time he was 29, literary historian Van Wyck Brooks (1886-1963) had published five books: a collection of poems written while he and John Hall Wheelock were at Harvard called Verses by Two Undergraduates (1905); The Wine of the Puritans: A Study of Present-Day America (1908); The Malady of the Ideal: Senancour, Maurice de Guerin, and. Amiel (1913); John Addington Symonds: A Biography Study (1914); and The World . Later in 1915, Brooks published a slender but rather provocative volume called America’s Coming of Age.

America's Coming-of-age. America's Coming-of-age. Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. american, whitman, emerson, social, poe, literature, disinterested, lowbrow, ideal, apotheosis, social ideal, sargasso sea, public domain, american life, inspired millionaire, american literature, human nature, google book, george william, business man. Publisher. ark:/13960/t7np23536. Author: Brooks, Van Wyck, 1886-1963. Note: New York: B. W. Huebsch, 1915. Title: America's Coming-of-Age. Subject: National characteristics, American.

Other articles where America’s Coming of Age is discussed: Van Wyck Brooks. n his first major work, America’s Coming-of-Age (1915), which made a strong impact with its thesis that the Puritan duality that separated. n his first major work, America’s Coming-of-Age (1915), which made a strong impact with its thesis that the Puritan duality that separated spiritual and money matters had resulted in a corresponding split in contemporary American culture between highbrow and lowbrow publics, neither of which was helpful to the writer.

Find nearly any book by Van Wyck Brooks. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Confident Years, The - 1885-1915. ISBN 9781299045019 (978-1-299-04501-9) Hardcover, . Dutton & C. 1952. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove America's coming-of-age from your list? America's coming-of-age. Published 1924 by .

Van Wyck Brooks himself imaginatively at all the various geological epochs, from the Stone Age to the end of the world, he has for good and al. .

An excerpt from the Introduction: A natural pause appears to have come in the career of Mr. After so many years of travelling up and down through time and space, familiarizing himself with all the various parts of the solar system and presenting himself imaginatively at all the various geological epochs, from the Stone Age to the end of the world, he has for good and all domesticated himself in his own planet and point of time.

Comments

Swordsong Swordsong
I was very disappointed upon receiving this item to realize it was a facsimile of a marked-up library copy. i knew something was up with the weird cover (not a US image). I feel completely ripped off, and would not have purchased it had I known.
Gagas Gagas
By the time he was 29, literary historian Van Wyck Brooks (1886-1963) had published five books: a collection of poems written while he and John Hall Wheelock were at Harvard called “Verses by Two Undergraduates” (1905); “The Wine of the Puritans: A Study of Present-Day America” (1908); “The Malady of the Ideal: Senancour, Maurice de Guerin, and Amiel” (1913); “John Addington Symonds: A Biography Study” (1914); and “The World H.G. Wells” (1915).

Later in 1915, Brooks published a slender but rather provocative volume called “America’s Coming of Age.” In five related essays, Brooks argued that culture “… should bear a critical relationship to social reality,” notes his biographer, James Hoopes. “Culture should express the ideal and exhort society to realize it.” That’s how Brooks believed culture functioned in Europe. In America, however, that had not happened.

Rather than a centralizing influence, culture (including literature) occupied two distinct positions in American society, Brooks said – high-brow and low-brow. He traced the two positions back to the 18th century, finding high-brow culture originating in the writings of the theologians like Jonathan Edwards and low-brow culture coming from the writings of Benjamin Franklin. Two cultures had not met in the middle, and each continued to occupy specific positions.

How this operated at the level of American literature, Brooks said, was that high-brow culture was a kind of meaningless idealism, while low-brow culture was a kind of meaningless realism. The two were divided, and prospects didn’t seem good for a union any time soon.

These two cultures could easily be seen in popular writing (Brooks cites Edgar Allen Poe as rather “vulgar”) and contrasting with serious writers like writing like Nathaniel Hawthorne. In Brooks’ view, Walt Whitman came close to unifying the two, but Whitman seemed more an exception than the rule.

Culture, of course, has consequences, and Brooks saw the division of American culture as having consequences. Business, for example, he associated with low-brow culture, and academic writers with high-brow. And the two were separated by what looked like an unbridgeable gulf.

The result, Brooks said in “America’s Coming of Age,” was unsettling, with American culture like some pre-Darwinian state. “America is like a vast Sargasso Sea – a prodigious welter of unconscious life, swept by ground-swells of half-conscious emotion,” he wrote. “All manner of living things are drifting into it, phosphorescent, gayly colored, gathered into knots and clotted masses, gelatinous, unformed, flimsy, tangled, rising and falling, floating and merging…everywhere an unchecked, uncharted, unorganized vitality like that of the first chaos.”

It’s fascinating to read this discussion of pre-World War I America a century later during a raucous, unsettling, and rather wild election campaign. It would be rather too easy to define the various presidential candidates as either high-brow or low-brow. And it would be too easy to understand American culture broadly as our celebrity-dominated and often crude entertainment society and the rather sterile and to most Americans meaningless activity that passes for a lot of academic culture.

Too easy, yes, but there are elements of truth in what Brooks identified a century ago that we experience daily in 2016.