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eBook Heimsuchung ePub

eBook Heimsuchung ePub

by Jenny Erpenbeck

  • ISBN: 3821857730
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Jenny Erpenbeck
  • Language: German
  • Publisher: Eichborn Verlag (2008)
  • Pages: 190
  • ePub book: 1992 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1896 kb
  • Other: mbr doc lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 498

Description

Jenny Erpenbeck writes unlike any other writer I’ve ever had the fortune to read

Heimsuchung reicht tief in die deutsche Vergangenheit. Jenny Erpenbeck writes unlike any other writer I’ve ever had the fortune to read. I have never come across such a powerful blend of darkness, poetry, exposure of the subconscious, dread for what is to come and a deep sadness and guilt for all that could not be prevented. This is evident in her masterpiece The End of Days and in Visitation.

Jenny Erpenbeck Heimsuchung. 6 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

Jenny Erpenbeck Heimsuchung. Want to like this page?

Jedem einzelnen Schicksal gibt Jenny Erpenbeck eine eigene literarische Form, jedes entfaltet auf ganz eigene Weise seine Dramatik, seine Tragik, sein Glück

Ein Haus an einem märkischen See – und wie ein ganzes Jahrhundert in ihm wütet Ein Haus an einem märkischen See: Es ist. Jedem einzelnen Schicksal gibt Jenny Erpenbeck eine eigene literarische Form, jedes entfaltet auf ganz eigene Weise seine Dramatik, seine Tragik, sein Glück. Alle zusammen bilden ein Panorama des letzten Jahrhunderts, das verstört, beglückt, verunsichert und versöhnt.

Jedem einzelnen Schicksal gibt Jenny Erpenbeck eine eigene literarische Form, jedes entfaltet auf ganz eigene Weise seine Dramatik, seine Tragik, sein Glück.

Author Jenny Erpenbeck may owe some stylistic influence to the Swiss writer Robert Walser (1878-1956), though I'm . Award-winning Jenny Erpenbeck is a representative of the younger generation of German authors (born in 1967). Many like her were born and raised in then East Germany.

The similarity is in their seeming detachment, their insouciantly restrained matter-of-factness. They both write such simple German sentences that require such complex reflection from the reader. Their background enables them to take a different perspective on the past.

Jenny Erpenbeck (born 1967) is a German writer and opera director, recipient of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize

Jenny Erpenbeck (born 1967) is a German writer and opera director, recipient of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. Born in East Berlin, Erpenbeck is the daughter of the physicist, philosopher and writer John Erpenbeck and the Arabic translator Doris Kilias. Her grandparents are the authors Fritz Erpenbeck and Hedda Zinner. In Berlin she attended an Advanced High School, where she graduated in 1985

A bestseller in Germany, Visitation has established Jenny Erpenbeck as one of Europe’s most significant contemporary authors

A forested property on a Brandenburg lake outside Berlin lies at the heart of this darkly sensual, elegiac novel

Translated from the german. Originally published in Germany under the title Heimsuchung by Eichborn Verlag

Translated from the german. A new directions book. Originally published in Germany under the title Heimsuchung by Eichborn Verlag. The translation of this work was supported by a grant from the Goethe-Institut, which is funded by the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The short quotation by Friedrich Hölderlin on p. v is Nick Hoff ’s translation as it appears in Odes and Elegies (Wesleyan, 2008). Erpenbeck, Jenny, 1967–.

Visitation by Jenny Erpenbeck (Heimsuchung, 2008) . The book begins like a fairy tale with the chapter The Wealthy Farmer and His Four Daughters.

Visitation by Jenny Erpenbeck (Heimsuchung, 2008) translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky (2010) New Directions (2010) 151 pp. Jenny Erpenbeck is one of those names that I frequently catch glimpses of in my peripheral vision. Here we get to know the land (which was briefly introduced in geological terms in the prologue), a home built upon the land, and a widowed farmer and - well - his four daughters.

Comments

Topmen Topmen
One of those books that really touched me and which I will read again. Makes you think about your own life, the lives of others, our interaction with others, the meaning of life, love, cruelty and all of this woven into the turbulent German history of the last one hundred years.
Gavirus Gavirus
Overall, it's a bit disjointed. Still, it's good to see what's going on in German literature these days.
Grari Grari
Ich genoss den Roman für gut gezeichnete Figuren außerdem fließende und malerische Sprache. Ich hoffe, weitere Bücher des Autors zu lesen. Tatsächlich gab es nur einziges schwierige Kapitel, unter den Letzten über die endlosen juristischen Streit, randvolles mit abstoßenden Rechtsbegriffe.
Velan Velan
Using an imaginative structure, written in a dense and memorable way, the book explores various German lives from just before the Nazi years up to German reunification. Insightful and enriching.
Vit Vit
"Heimsuchung" is a mere 150 pages but a stereopticon of Germany from the 1920s to the 1990s, not explicitly of events but rather of "emotions as history" ... an entrancing book to read, crystal clear in episodes, yet hard to reassemble as narrative, each intimate 'local' episode terminated abruptly by the contingencies of the larger world. And a difficult book to explicate! How can anyone make explicit the "thoughts" of a place or the "memories" in the mind of a house, when places don't think and houses are serendipitous about construction, alteration, demolition? We people who inhabit a place and a house are ourselves just fading memories. Effectively we are the ghosts who haunt the houses we claim to occupy, and we are so easily exorcized by forgetfulness ...

The German title of this novella - Heimsuchung - could be translated as 'Haunting' or 'Revenance" as aptly as the English title "Visitation". All the episodes of the book occur in a summer house on the shore of a glacier-formed lake in he Mark Brandenburg north of Berlin, and each episode recounts the transit of a 'feeling' presence, a human, in the feelingless landscape. Even the house begins as raw materials clipped from nature and ends as rubble returned to nature. How ingenuous it is to claim "ownership" of a place! We are all 'subtenants' and 'illegitimate owners' like the unnamed but sharply individualized characters who live in, visit, re-visit, and leave. We aren't built to endure. Even the solid house endures less than a century. Even the glaciers melted and receded. This book is a parable of our beautiful comfortless insignificance.

Author Jenny Erpenbeck may owe some stylistic influence to the Swiss writer Robert Walser (1878-1956), though I'm sure other readers will scoff at that suggestion. The similarity is in their seeming detachment, their insouciantly restrained matter-of-factness. They both write such simple German sentences that require such complex reflection from the reader. Readers in German, or anglophone readers who have paid visitations to German culture and history, will unquestionably resonate like the sound peg of a cello to Erpenbeck's allusions. Readers who don't even notice such allusions can hardly be chastised for their unresponsiveness, however. They are the future; that's the 'lesson' of the book, that 'awareness' is memory, and memory is perishable. In themes, therefore, Erpenbeck comes very close to the German writer W.G. Sebald (1944-2001). But Erpenbeck is a writer of stark originality. If I were a gambler, a betting man, I'd offer good odds that Erpenbeck, born in East Berlin in 1967, will be a Nobel Prize winner roughly a decade from now.
Gavirgas Gavirgas
"Farbig ist nur das, woran sie sich erinnert, mitten in dieser Dunkelheit, die sie umgibt, deren Kern sie ist, farbige Erinnerungen hat sie in ihrem vom Licht vergessenen Kopf, Erinnerungen von jemand, der sie einmal war. Wer war sie? Wessen Kopf war ihr Kopf? Wem gehörten jetzt diese Erinnerungen?"
The "Girl ", who ponders these questions, is one of the protagonists in Jenny Erpenbeck's innovative and powerful novel Heimsuchung (translated expertly into "Visitation" by Susan Bernofksy). Memories of innocent excitement and youthful happiness, of arriving, settling down, and then having to leave again and of families and people loved and lost form the core of the story. Everything is centred around a lake-side summer house, surrounded by expansive woods and gardens in the region just east of Germany's capital, Berlin, affording it the role as the central character and integrating force of the narrative. Using her zooming lens, the author condenses many decades of twentieth century German history into time-specific, intricate and intimate glimpses into the lives of twelve different residents and their families living on the property. While the owners build and add to the house, change it and its grounds over time, leaving visible marks and impressions, they are in turn impacted by the environment and the historical events occurring beyond it.

Starting out more like a fairy-tale, the novel gains intensity as it progresses: the portraits become more intense, reaching deeper into the background of the individuals, also relating their actions to specific historical time periods of the last decades: from the Weimar Republic, through the Nazi regime and the Holocaust, War and Soviet occupation, to Socialist East Germany and Fall of the Berlin Wall and beyond. The Girl's haunting account far away, having had to flee her home and Germany, stands out as one of the most heart-wrenching chapters. In others, the reader senses underlying tense emotions, despite the deceptively detached, often even sparse language, that refers to most protagonists only as the Architect, the Writer, the Visitor, etc. or the Gardener. However, despite the apparent indistinctness, the individuals portrayed are engagingly realistic and anything but bland generalizations. Events beyond the calm of the summer house are alluded to, hints that may be easier to detect for the German reader. The narrator's language and style changes slightly as the story moves from one voice to the next. Erpenbeck often uses rhythmic prose, sometimes staccato sentences, repetitions, or lyrical prose to reflect her protagonists' moods and characteristics. While the different individuals pass through the house as transient residents - some return later, allowing for intergenerational connections - only the "Gardener", more a symbol than a person, remains as a constant, his chapters alternating with the others.

The novel's title, "Heimsuchung", carries several connotations in German. One meaning implies a sense of doom and threat lurking somewhere near by (such as ghosts). Another suggests a meaning of "home" and "search". Both connotations are beautifully captured in different chapters. For example. the Authoress looks back on a long life, that included fleeing the home of her youth all the way to Moscow and the Urals, and now her "I-c-h-k-e-h-r-e-h-e-i-m" to the house and the lake continues the search for her real, emotional "home". On the other hand, the overconfident Architect, a former Albert Speer collaborator, is on the run, the ghosts of the past having caught up with him: he is locking up, hiding the valuables, leaving the key for the next occupant of the house...

Award-winning Jenny Erpenbeck is a representative of the younger generation of German authors (born in 1967). Many like her were born and raised in then East Germany. Their background enables them to take a different perspective on the past. Inspired by and based on her family's summer house, the author sensitively mixes her own memories and those of people she knew with a wider-ranging fictional reality of her novel. Erpenbeck's voice is fresh and independent and very convincing. "Heimsuchung", published in German in 2008, is now available as "Visitation" in the highly praised translation by Susan Bernofksy. Having read the novel in its original, all translations are mine. [Friederike Knabe]