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eBook SCIENCE WARS: WHAT SCIENTISTS KNOW AND HOW THEY KNOW IT, FORMAT (THE GREAT COURSES, SCIENCE  MATHEMATICS) ePub

eBook SCIENCE WARS: WHAT SCIENTISTS KNOW AND HOW THEY KNOW IT, FORMAT (THE GREAT COURSES, SCIENCE MATHEMATICS) ePub

  • ISBN: 1598032046
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  • ePub book: 1884 kb
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  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 873

Description

I don’t want to send downloads. In 24 half-hour lectures, Science Wars explores the history of competing conceptions of scientific knowledge and their implications for science and society from the onset of the Scientific Revolution in the 1600s to the present. There have been a raft of popular books about what scientists know," says Professor Goldman, "but to the best of my knowledge, there is not a single one of these popular books that focuses centrally on the question of how scientists know what they know.

Science Wars of the Late 20th Century 23. Intelligent Design and the Scope of Science 2. A genuine Brain-teaser (tormentor?) from The Great Courses! This is a "Course for the New Millenium", which delves fearlessly into any number of Modern shibboleths

Science Wars of the Late 20th Century 23. Intelligent Design and the Scope of Science 24. Truth, History, and Citizenship. A genuine Brain-teaser (tormentor?) from The Great Courses! This is a "Course for the New Millenium", which delves fearlessly into any number of Modern shibboleths. Friedrich Nietzsche would be proud of you, Prof.

Welcome to the science wars-a long-running battle over the status of scientific knowledge that began in ancient .

Welcome to the science wars-a long-running battle over the status of scientific knowledge that began in ancient Greece, raged furiously among scientists, social scientists, and humanists during the 1990s, and has re-emerged in today's conflict between science and religion over issues such as evolution. Format: DVD. As the founder and chair of the International Society of Unified Science, I have a great interest in the topic of the philosophy of science, the subject of this course.

Topic Science & Mathematics Subtopic History of Science Science Wars: What .

Topic Science & Mathematics Subtopic History of Science Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know It Course Guidebook Professor Steven L. Goldman Lehigh University PUBLISHED BY: THE GREAT COURSES. 4 and book publications through the 1990s on emerging synergies that were transforming relationships among knowledge, innovation, and global commerce. Professor Goldman is the author of The Teaching Company course Science in the Twentieth Century: A Social Intellectual Survey (2004). ii 2006 The Teaching Company

What is it that scientists know, and how do they know what they know? The "science wars" in the late 20th century were a dispute within modern science that signals a deep, longstanding conflict over this question.

What is it that scientists know, and how do they know what they know? The "science wars" in the late 20th century were a dispute within modern science that signals a deep, longstanding conflict over this question. 1. Knowledge and Truth Are Age-Old Problems. 0 of 32 min. 2. Competing Visions of the Scientific Method.

Jun 27, 2016 Gary Beauregard Bottomley rated it it was amazing. This is a Great Courses series of lectures similar to Science in the Twentieth Century: A Social-Intellectual Survey, except that the focus is on the conflict between knowing something in fact and knowing something in all probability.

Listen to the full audiobook Science Wars: What Scientists Know and . It will provide you with an understanding of how science works that is a. .

Listen to the full audiobook Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know It for free at audilib. Choose one: (A) Science gives us objective knowledge of an independently existing reality, or (B) Scientific knowledge is always provisional and tells us nothing that is universal, necessary, or certain about the world. It will provide you with an understanding of how science works that is as important as ever.

Welcome to the science wars. This long-running battle over the status of scientific knowledge began in ancient Greece, raged furiously among scientists, social scientists, and humanists during the 1990s, and has reemerged in today's conflict between science and religion over issues like evolution. These lectures are an answer to that critical need.

The Great Courses are uniquely crafted for lifelong learners like you, with engaging, immersive learning experiences you can’t get in a lecture hall. The secret ingredient is YOU. Our customers are involved at every step of the process, helping to choose course subjects and select professors from the thousands we screen each year. The course creation process that follows involves so much more than just placing a camera in the back of a classroom The Great Courses are uniquely crafted for lifelong learners like you, with engaging, immersive learni.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Science Wars CD Course - What Scientists Know and How They Know It - The Teaching Company (The Great Courses) from your list? Science Wars CD Course - What Scientists Know and How They Know It - The Teaching Company (The Great Courses). by Steven L. Goldman. Published 2006 by The Teaching Company.

Comments

Nalaylewe Nalaylewe
This is a four DVD, 24 (1/2 hour) lecture course, produced by the Teaching Company, that comes with an excellent guidebook supplying needed notes and summaries of the arguments of each lecture. Additionally, in the latter, there is also an historical timeline, glossary, biography, bibliography, and some internet sources. I found this quite an excellent, and absorbing, examination of the history of science, and an attempt to find what out what science truly is: what it does, what are/should be its ends, what scientific knowledge is, and resultant theories to be about... To conclude the series there is a discussion of the 'Science Wars' of the 1990's, and an examination of the Theory of Intelligent Design as a simulacrum to aid in the elucidation of Scientific Theories themselves, this being in the next to last lecture. Dr. Goldman so ascended his analysis of science, gradually throughout, to the final five lectures, which were themselves riveting. In the process, Thomas Kuhn's "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions" did figure prominently in the Professor's study. In summary, a delight to all those interested in the history and philosophy of science.
Katishi Katishi
As the founder and chair of the International Society of Unified Science, I have a great interest in the topic of the philosophy of science, the subject of this course. Goldman knows his material backwards and forwards—this course is one of the best I’ve ever taken from the Teaching Company; note: I have the $179/yr streaming contract, so I usually watch 5 lectures/day.

Philosophers commonly classify propositions as analytic or synthetic. Analytic statements, like those in logic and mathematics, can be 100% certain, if no error in deductive reasoning is made and the premises are true. Synthetic statements, like those in physical science and biological science, are not 100% certain, because they are usually inductively derived from experiments or observations. As an example, it was once thought that all swans were white—until a black one was found. Also, as the professor points out, the synthetic or observational statements are often suffused with theoretical assumptions—as is the case in the interpretation of particle experiments.

The professor makes the point that science is conjectural, temporal, and tentative. Theories change when anomalies pile up, as Kuhn said. However, the Scientific Establishment is now so entrenched and so imperial that it is difficult for a new paradigm to replace the standard ones. Even so, many changes have been made within the current paradigms—just look at the difference in science between 1900 and 2000! The professor rightly states that most of the current scientific theories will be gone by 2100—and I agree!

I’d like to have Prof. Goldman read Dewey B. Larson’s works, such as The Case Against the Nuclear Atom, Beyond Newton, Nothing But Motion, Basic Properties of Matter, and The Universe of Motion. In these books, Larson discusses the philosophy of science and develops a new theory called the Reciprocal System, which is unified, general, and axiomatic. The Fundamental Postulates of the Reciprocal System give rise to an entire theoretical universe, which is then compared step-by-step with the real, objective universe; this is a “one-to-one mapping from the theoretical to that observed,” which the professor also discussed. I have written numerous papers on this theory and have constructed a comprehensive database which helps to verify the theory. In contrast with “mathematical certainty,” “physical certainty” is achieved when the probability of a theory being wrong is reduced to a negligible level.

If you question the Big Bang, black holes, worm holes, the nuclear theory of the atom, Quantum Mechanics, neutron stars, quarks, degenerate matter, dark matter, dark energy, strings, curved space, the fusion process in stars, QED, virtual particles, the “Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs Boson, and gravitational waves and gravitons, you should take this course—and then read Larson’s books and my papers, such as “The Case Against Modern Physics” (free on the Web).

As a side note, the professor mentions the great astronomer Halton Arp; his work is consistent with that of the Reciprocal System, but not with conventional astrophysics! The redshift of the quasars is only partially due to the galactic recession; the rest is due to an explosion velocity. So, again, this is another reason why I so highly recommend this course!
Humin Humin
The Teaching Company has produced a large number of high quality lecture series, and this one is, hands down, the best one I have come across. Given that I have watched more than fifty of their series, and the fact that, to date, I have not given one a rating of less than four stars, this lecture series stands as the best of a bright bunch. There are warnings to be heard, though. The first of which is that this lecture series in not for the faint of heart. Goldman covers a much larger swath of material that one might encounter in one of the other Teaching Company lectures series. Another point is that the series is fundamentally as philosophical as it is scientific, and probably more so. Goldman's understanding of the fundamental problems of epistemology in science is so acute that he, part and parcel, gives an account of exactly why I transitioned from physics to philosophy of physics --and that he holds a degree in physics suggests to me that we have had similar experiences; so if you want to get some sense of why one would transition from the hard sciences to philosophy of science, as so many are doing, this is a lecture series for you. The lecture series is challenging, but let me also say that it is also worth it.

Since Goldman has a knowledge of physics, in addition to philosophy, he is in a very precisely situated position to explain the ins and outs that are necessary for the exfoliation of epistemological problems in science. The reason for this is that scientists tend to be quite dogmatic, whereas philosophers tend to be able to shrug off all dogma, allowing them to ask questions that sometimes slip by the well-train, and consequently well-dogmatized, scientists. To do this, Goldman spends much of the first half of the lecture giving the viewer or listener a rundown of developments in philosophy, which, at first, may seem irrelevant, as they precede the "modern" era of science, but are, in fact, very important, because they set the stage to illustrate an important event in the history and philosophy of science (even science itself): the time in which scientists segregated themselves from the philosophers, and, on the very next day, took to doing their own philosophy, and quite poorly, might I add. Also, Goldman very competently handles modern physics, such as the Bohr/Einstein debate over measurement on the quantum scale, the subject that Manjit Kumar covers in his book (which I also recommend, if you are interest!).

Goldman is very fair, however. I am not sure of the direction of his actual philosophical leanings, though my guess would be that he leans toward realism. At any rate, even if not a realist, he certainly does lay down the gauntlet for anti-realism, those who would believe that science acquires no real knowledge, or that the idea of science qua social construction somehow diminishes the ontological value of technology, in terms of it being a "real" construction. Goldman also covers many of the more recent developments in the battle between scientists and non-scientists over the epistemological (and ontological and metaphysical) status of science, which is not to be missed. This is where the earlier discussions on the old fashion philosophy become ever so relevant. In sum, I recommend this series to absolutely everyone, even if it requires re-watching a couple times.