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eBook God's Executioner Oliver Cromwell and the Conquest of Ireland ePub

eBook God's Executioner Oliver Cromwell and the Conquest of Ireland ePub

by Micheal Siochru

  • ISBN: 0571218466
  • Subcategory: No category
  • Author: Micheal Siochru
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber (2009)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1347 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1252 kb
  • Other: azw docx doc azw
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 303

Description

God's Englishman: Oliver Cromwell and the English Revolution. A warrior of Christ, somewhat like the crusaders of medieval Europe, he acted as God's executioner, convinced throughout the horrors of the legitimacy of his cause, and striving to build a better world for the chosen few.

God's Englishman: Oliver Cromwell and the English Revolution. He remains, therefore, a remarkably modern figure, somebody to be closely studied and understood, rather than simply revered or reviled.

God's Executioner book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking God's Executioner: Oliver Cromwell and the Conquest of Ireland as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In this book, Ó Siochrú is at his best, guiding readers briskly but not at all simplistically through more than a. .

In this book, Ó Siochrú is at his best, guiding readers briskly but not at all simplistically through more than a decade of blood and politics. For Ó Siochrú, Cromwell was a man who ‘uncritically accepted’ the horror stories regarding the rebellion, and the claim that the rebellion had no justification or back-story (p. 19), and who was determined to exact revenge upon the Irish Catholic population, irrespective of their involvement in the rising.

But Micheal OSiochru puts the Aherne anecdote at the start of his book to illustrate the continuing demonisation of Cromwell by the Irish . The story begins in 1641, years before Cromwell set foot in Ireland, with the rebellion.

But Micheal OSiochru puts the Aherne anecdote at the start of his book to illustrate the continuing demonisation of Cromwell by the Irish, and he strives to discover how far it is justified.

The said George said, that soon upon the conquest it was allowed by the clergy, and, as I heard say, confirmed by the Pope, and withal the Lords and chief men of the land did give up their titles and government unto King Henry and Second, and to sundry other kings since. Mr. FitzSimmons said, ‘Well, you see how the Irishry prosper notwithstanding.

Cromwell spent only nine months of his eventful life in Ireland, yet he stands accused there of war crimes, religious persecution and ethnic cleansing. In a century of unrelenting, bloody warfare and religious persecution throughout Europe, Cromwell was, in many ways, a product of his times.

God's Executioner: Oliver Cromwell and the Conquest of Ireland – By Micheál Ó Siochrú. oceedings{Gaunt2011GodsEO, title {God's Executioner: Oliver Cromwell and the Conquest of Ireland – By Miche{'a}l {'O} Siochr{'u}}, author {Peter James Gaunt}, year {2011} }.

Published by Faber & Faber. Cromwell spent only nine months of his eventful life in Ireland, yet he stands accused there of war crimes, religious persecution and ethnic cleansing. As commander-in-chief of the army in Ireland, however, the responsibilities for the excesses of the military must be laid firmly at his door, while the harsh nature of the post-war settlement also bears his personal imprint.

Cromwell spent only nine months of his eventful life in Ireland, yet he stands accused there of war crimes, religious persecution and ethnic cleansing. In a century of unrelenting, bloody warfare and religious persecution throughout Europe, Cromwell was, in many ways, a product of his times. As commander-in-chief of the army in Ireland, however, the responsibilities for the excesses of the military must be laid firmly at his door, while the harsh nature of the post-war settlement also bears his personal imprint. A warrior of Christ, somewhat like the crusaders of medieval Europe, he acted as God's executioner, convinced throughout the horrors of the legitimacy of his cause, and striving to build a better world for the chosen few.

Comments

Duzshura Duzshura
This book is a matter of fact accounting of Oliver Cromwell's conquest of Ireland and the associated problems that conquest caused. Dr. O'Siochru writes in an even, non-technical English, with matter-of-fact style throughout the work.

The book starts with the disastrous episode of community violence in 1641. The violence was a response to increasing Protestant cultural and economic domination of Ireland following the Tudor Conquest and it took place within the context of the vicious Wars of Religion between Catholics and Protestants in Europe. This attack on the Protestants summons the Devil in the form of Cromwell and his New Model Army.

This historical work is remarkably fair. It doesn’t seek to demonize Cromwell or insist his actions at Drogheda were less than what they probably where. The book also shows the important lieutenants of Cromwell and how they carried on his work-often far more violently than Cromwell himself.

If one is interested in the impacts of the English Civil War, or the War of the Three Kingdoms as it is now more commonly called, this is an excellent book to see how Ireland played in to that.

Critical Thinking: Throughout the book one must ask if the 1641 attack on the Protestants was really a terrible strategic error on the part of the Native Irish Catholics. The rebellion took place within the context of other anti-Stuart actions, such as the Covenanter Rebellions. Unlike the controlled, political violence of Scotland, the Irish discontent was focused on common people-not elites and their institutions. One must wonder if this action is part of the fierce anti-Catholic/pro-Union forces in Northern Ireland. Dr. O'Siochru hints and this, but the book has little in the way of speculation or moral commentary. The book sticks to the facts.
Capella Capella
Very well written story about Cromwell and the Parliament forces. It Looks at all the many view points in the so-called "rebellion" of 1641.
Der Bat Der Bat
Going to Ireland this fall and wanted to learn more about the Irish archenemy. The book details Cromwell's campaign against the Irish in good detail. Wish it was available in hardcover...
Bliss Bliss
Very informative! Oliver Cromwell was the Devil's executioner.
An interesting look at the history of a tyrant. Well worth reading.
Galubel Galubel
Great book! It was made into a very good documentary as well.
Dandr Dandr
Micheal O Siochru is an Irish academic. The book is about Ireland’s rebellion in the 1640s and its part in the English Civil War (1642–1651). Oliver Cromwell is only part of the story. He spent nine months in Ireland in 1649-1650. I have Irish friends who believe that Cromwell was a cross between Genghis Khan and Hitler, which explains the title of the book "God's Executioner."

When Cromwell landed in Ireland 1649, Charles I had recently been beheaded by the English Parliament. The book does not really explain why the Irish went to war with Parliament and why they supported Charles I. Neither side in the English Civil War was offering independence to Ireland. Charles I's father, James I (he of King James bible fame), had encouraged Protestant immigration to Ireland. The Catholics had rebelled against Charles I in 1641. The English Civil War was not an Irish fight and the monarchy had already lost the war by 1649. Reaching a peace deal with Parliament would probably have been the sensible option. However, Ireland managed to pick the losing side in both English civil wars of the 17th century and paid a heavy price.

What is often forgotten is that this was a violent and brutal period in history. Taking up arms against anyone had serious consequences, especially if you lost. There is a danger in trying to impose our standards of morality on the people of that era. Ireland has only ever been invaded by England, maybe if another European power had invaded the Irish perspective might be different today. For example, the Thirty Years War ended in 1648. It shared similarities to Game of Thrones. It was fought between European protestants and Catholics and it is estimated that eight million people died. Armies marched through the German countryside, taking what they wanted while burning, raping, and looting. The city of Marburg was occupied eleven different times. German cities lost a third of their population and the rural population was reduced by two fifths. There were atrocities on both sides. This was also a time when witches were still being burnt at the stake throughout Europe. This was the era when Cromwell invaded Ireland.

The population of Ireland in the 1640s was only about 1.0 million, and the island is about the size of the State of Indiana. There were a large number of Irish factions and the book does not make it clear what they all wanted out of the war. The main groups were the native Gaelic Catholics, Old English Catholics (English settlers who had lived in Ireland for almost 500 years but were still not viewed as Irish by the locals), English protestant settlers from Tudor times, and Scottish protestants who had settled in the North since 1600. There were also the English royalists who were still continuing to fight the civil war.

The Stuarts were not friends of Ireland, The situation did not improve for the Irish after Cromwell died and Charles II became king in 1660. Cromwell's New Model Army had proved itself a virtually unbeatable force in the Civil War. Siochru does not explain why the Irish thought it would be a good idea to fight Cromwell, because defeat was inevitable.The Irish troops were also led by an incompetent Irish aristocrat, the Marquess of Ormonde, whose main loyalty was to Charles I. Ormonde in a crucial battle appointed a bishop to lead his army. Not surprisingly, they lost.

Siochru tends to focus on the battles and the atrocities rather than discussing the incomprehensible political strategy of the Irish. Ireland had rebelled in 1641 and Irish Catholics had brutally murdered 5,000 Protestant settlers, including women and children. Siochru claims that this was a 9/11 type event in England and Cromwell wanted payback. However, he states that 5,000 Catholics had been killed in retaliation by the English government in 1642. The leader of the 1641 rebellion, Felim O'Neill, was hung, drawn and quartered for treason.

The English Civil War was virtually over when Cromwell arrived in Ireland. His objectives seemed clear. Ormonde had provided troops to the King during the war and had to be crushed. Cromwell’s aim was to mop up the royalist forces and establish Parliamentary control over the country. The civil war in England had been brutal. England suffered a 3.7% loss of its population, the equivalent figure for the American Civil War was about 2.0%. By 1649 his army had probably seen too much killing.

Cromwell was a religious extremist even by Puritan standards. Cromwell believed that his success in battle proved that God was on his side. He only picked soldiers who were God fearing Protestants. They probably hated Catholics. Cromwell was obsessed with sin. Later, while a dictator in England he banned Christmas, and shut down the theatres. When Cromwell died most English people were relieved and they yearned for a more peaceful life. Cromwell was reviled in England until he became a hero to the Victorians.

The siege at Drogheda was described by the English historian Simon Schama as Cromwell’s war crime. The garrison was commanded by an English royalist called Sir Arthur Aston, and most of his garrison was Protestant. Aston refused to surrender and in those days that invited mass slaughter. Siochru quotes the Anglo-Irish Duke of Wellington 150 years later who said: “that it is always understood that the defenders of a fortress stormed have no claim to quarter.” Aston and about 800 unarmed civilians were killed at Drogheda. The Irish also refused to surrender at the later sieges at Wexford, Clonmel, and Kilkenny. Siochru provides a range, but Wikipedia puts the total death toll at Drogheda at 3,600 and 3,500 at Wexford. Cromwell lost 2,000–2,500 soldiers during the siege of Clonmel in 1650, when his men were caught in a clever trap set by Hugh Dubh O'Neill. Cromwell's army eventually prevailed and he then returned to England to fight the Scots.

I found God's Executioner a confusing and depressing read. It is a tragic story, but the Irish leadership did not pursue a clever political strategy and their people, especially the Catholics, were punished accordingly. The English are portrayed in a poor light, but in the 17th century that was how war was fought.
Monam Monam
if you research this man he was just a murderer