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eBook Basics of Semiotics (Advances in Semiotic) ePub

eBook Basics of Semiotics (Advances in Semiotic) ePub

by John Deely

  • ISBN: 0253205689
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: John Deely
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press (July 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 168
  • ePub book: 1542 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1425 kb
  • Other: azw lit lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 964

Description

Semiotics: An Introductory Anthology (Advances in Semiotics).

Semiotics: An Introductory Anthology (Advances in Semiotics). Indiana University Press.

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Basics Of Semiotics (Adva. has been added to your Cart. Of course you will have to read this more than once if you don't have much of a background in semiotics, but any book that simplifies it more probably severely misrepresents and misunderstands the nature of the sign

Basics Of Semiotics (Adva. Of course you will have to read this more than once if you don't have much of a background in semiotics, but any book that simplifies it more probably severely misrepresents and misunderstands the nature of the sign. 2 people found this helpful.

An introduction to semiotics and biosemiotics by the noted expert in the field, John Deely. 20Semiotics/files/ joined. html CONTENTS Preface ix Thematic Epigraphs xvii 1. LITERARY SEMIOTICS AND THE DOCTRINE OF SIGNS.

Basics Of Semiotics book. Basics of Semiotics (Advances in Semiotics). 1587310619 (ISBN13: 9781587310614). This short, cogent, philosophically oriented book outlines and analyzes the basic concepts of semiotics in a coherent, overall framework.

Excellent Philosophical Introduction to Semiotics. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. Having waded through piles of literature on semiotics, I found that Deely's text was precisely what I had been looking for. Texts in semiotics seem to divide into two sorts

Excellent Philosophical Introduction to Semiotics. Texts in semiotics seem to divide into two sorts. On the other hand, there are texts in applied semiotics that uncover the structures of various sign systems.

Daniel Chandler is a Lecturer in the department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. It was partly a way of advancing and clarifying my own understanding of the subject. The lengthy treatment of structuralist semiotics in this book is intended to be of particular value to readers who wish to use semi-otics as an approach to textual analysis.

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Semiotics, Edusemiotics and the Culture of Education. Similar books and articles. Reading the Signs: Some Basics of Semiotics. John Deely & Inna Semetsky - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (3):207-219. John Deely - 1993 - Semiotica 97 (3-4):247-266. Theses on Semiology and Semiotics. John Deely - 2010 - American Journal of Semiotics 26 (1/4):17 - 25. Semiotic Gratuities: Some Thoughts on John Deely’s Introducing Semiotics

The last half century has produced an increasing interest in semiotics, the study of signs. As an interdisciplinary field, moreover, semiotics has produced a vast literature from many different points of view. As the discourse has expanded, clear definitions and goals become more elusive. Semioticians still lack a unified theory of the purposes of semiotics as a discipline as well as a comprehensive rationale for the4 linking of semiosis at the levels of culture, society, and nature. As Deely suggests in his preface, the image of the modern semiotic universe is the same as that of astronomy in 1611 as suggested by John Donne: "Tis all in pieces, all coherence gone; / All just supply, and all Relation."

This short, cogent, philosophically oriented book outlines and analyzes the basic concepts of semiotics in a coherent, overall framework.

Comments

Kieel Kieel
This book deserves five stars forever with not one demurral. John Deely is not lost to us. He lives in this book. He is in my view the most sagacious and forthcoming Peirce scholar ever so far. He understood his universal significance and most Peirce reflection these days do not even seem to understand the word universal. That is cruel and doubtless unfair but forgive me. It merely reflects my sense of Deely's importance. Because this is a giant of a book and I rarely buy so-called real books anymore, this is not a review as much as an appreciation prior to going at it with the infinite patience I only give to massively significant texts. Like the Gospel of Mark and some writings of Peirce himself. Semiosis is the heart of Peirce and he is the master builder of what we need now -- a way to deal with all reality. And see what it is. This book is an effort to touch on the nature and varieties of semiosis. And at the end, Deely reminds us that everything there is originated first in a sign. In today's fragmented world, Deely's book should be required reading across every discipline and fan out to every inquiring mind on the planet.
Lcena Lcena
Having waded through piles of literature on semiotics, I found that Deely's text was precisely what I had been looking for. Texts in semiotics seem to divide into two sorts. On the one hand, there are theoretical texts that introduce a maze of sign distinctions and accounts of semiosis. On the other hand, there are texts in applied semiotics that uncover the structures of various sign systems. Both sorts of texts are agreed that the semiotic approach represents a major shift from the tradition of representational thought, but are murky on the precise nature of this shift. It is this that makes Deely's book unique. Deely carefully develops his introduction to semiotics with respect to the philosophical tradition, showing how it offers a new alternative to the traditional positions of realism and idealism, that is lucidly argued and which draws out many of the not immediately noticeable consequences of the semiotic approach. While it is true that Deely's text sometimes suffers obscure usages of language (no doubt resulting from the influence of scholastic and Rennaissance theories of signs on his thought), this occasional obscurity is more than offset by his ability to draw out the implications of semiotics and show its relevance to various epistemological and ontological debates that have informed philosophy.
Made-with-Love Made-with-Love
I'll confess my bias here. I like not just facts or data, but key concepts or ideas--and this book has them, in spades. BUT I also like concrete material--specific examples, actual instances. Such illustrations of ideas, help me (1) comprehend the concepts, (2) see the crucial importance or "so-what" the difference the concepts make to some exigency, (3) to see how to apply or use the concepts, and (4) to read with more lively interest. And so, here's to the happy blending of the idea and the instance. ("Poetry is abstraction blooded.")
Unfortunately, many academic treatises float in the abstract stratosphere without ever descending to an earth-like instance.
This book is, alas, no exception. I clambered through the aerial crags of concept after concept (and no sense WHY this matters), and found only ONE specific example.
That of--a "thermometer." That's right--and I'm not even sure to what point....
Fortunately I discovered Semiotics for Beginners, by Daniel Chandler. "You could, too."
Grinin Grinin
Of course you will have to read this more than once if you don't have much of a background in semiotics, but any book that simplifies it more probably severely misrepresents and misunderstands the nature of the sign.

John Deely is a fount of understanding in a field which is more than half-full of practitioners who know nothing of it.
SoSok SoSok
I hoped this book would give me an understanding of semiotics from the point of view of classical and scholastic metaphysics. Certainly John Deely has the learning to do this. But I found this book largely unreadable. Long, long sentences. Clause piled upon clause. No examples. No contact with the world of experience. If he were my student, I would force him to write out, in one page, using short sentences, just what he wanted to say. But alas, he has passed that stage. I haven't found the book I sought, but this is not that book.