cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in The Ring
eBook The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in The Ring ePub

eBook The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in The Ring ePub

by Kristen Lacefield

  • ISBN: 075466984X
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Kristen Lacefield
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (November 28, 2010)
  • Pages: 248
  • ePub book: 1462 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1475 kb
  • Other: doc lit mbr azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 656

Description

Book Condition: Ashgate; 2010; . 2 x . 3 x . 2 Inches; Hardcover; Very Good+ in Very Good dust jacket . The Scary Screen is a useful contribution to studies of The Ring, horror film, and cultural anxieties evoked by technology. Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts.

Book Condition: Ashgate; 2010; . 2 Inches; Hardcover; Very Good+ in Very Good dust jacket; Text clean and tight; 256 Pages. Sold by michener rutledge. Kristen Lacefield is a P.

່ານປຶ້ມນີ້ໂດຍໃຊ້ແອັບ Google Play Books ໃນຄອມພິວເຕີ, ອຸປະກອນ android, iOS .

່ານປຶ້ມນີ້ໂດຍໃຊ້ແອັບ Google Play Books ໃນຄອມພິວເຕີ, ອຸປະກອນ android, iOS ຂອງທ່ານ. າວໂຫຼດໄວ້ອ່ານອອບລາຍ, ໝາຍບອກ, ບຸກມາກ ຫຼື ຈົດບັນທຶກໃນຂະນະທີ່ທ່ານອ່ານ The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in The Ring. Analyzing the extraordinary trans-cultural popularity of the Ring phenomenon, The Scary Screen locates much of its power in the ways in which the books and films astutely graft contemporary cultural preoccupations onto the generic elements of the ghost story in particular, the Japanese ghost story.

The Scary Screen book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in the Ring.

Contents: Introduction: media anxiety and the Ring phenomenon, Kristen Lacefield; Part I Spreading the Word: The horror of media: technology and spirituality in the Ringu films, Anthony Enns; Tracing the transference of a cross-cultural media virus: The evolution of Ring, Greg Wright.

Contents: Introduction: media anxiety and the Ring phenomenon, Kristen Lacefield; Part I Spreading the Word: The horror of media: technology and spirituality in the Ringu films, Anthony Enns; Tracing the transference of a cross-cultural media virus: The evolution of Ring, Greg Wright; From gene to meme: the rhetoric of thought contagion in Koji Suzuki's Ring cycle, Chris Miles

Contents: Introduction: media anxiety and the Ring phenomenon, Kristen Lacefield Part I Spreading the Word: The horror of media: technology and spirituality in the Ringu films, Anthony Enns Tracing the transference of a cross-cultural media virus: The evolution of Ring, Greg Wright.

Contents: Introduction: media anxiety and the Ring phenomenon, Kristen Lacefield Part I Spreading the Word: The horror of media: technology and spirituality in the Ringu films, Anthony Enns Tracing the transference of a cross-cultural media virus: The evolution of Ring, Greg Wright From gene to meme: the rhetoric of thought contagion in Koji Suzuki's Ring cycle, Chris Miles. Part II Loss in Translation: Cultural constructions of the supernatural: the case of Ringu and The Ring, Valerie We. ONTINUE READING.

The stories of The Ring/Ringu, the contributors all variously argue, present a highly . The organizational scheme of the book is structured around different approaches to the topic of media anxiety in The Ring/Ringu books and films.

The stories of The Ring/Ringu, the contributors all variously argue, present a highly charged flash point at which these deeply held fears and fantasies converge. As Steven Rawle, Catelin Benson-Allott, Kimberly Jackson, D. Haque remind us, true to a traditional thread in (American/ Western) horror cinema, the ground upon which these anxieties appear is the sexed female body.

In the book Chatwood described experiments where the "image of objects on the retina of the human eye might so affect it that a photograph . Kristen Lacefield (1 April 2013). pp. 34, 37–. ISBN 9781409476191.

Kristen Lacefield (1 April 2013).

Are you sure you want to remove Kristen Lacefield from your list?

Are you sure you want to remove Kristen Lacefield from your list?

The Horror of Media: Technology and Spirituality in the Ringu Films, The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in The Ring, ed. Kristen Lacefield (London: Ashgate, 2010). The City as Archive in Jason Lutes’ Berlin, Comics and the City: Urban Space in Print, Picture, and Sequence, ed.

The Horror of Media: Technology and Spirituality in the Ringu Films, The Scary Screen: Media Anxiety in The Ring, ed. Jörn Ahrens and Arno Meteling (New York: Continuum, 2010). Psychic Radio: Sound Technologies, Ether Bodies, and Vibrations of the Soul, The Senses and Society . (2008)

Lacefield, Kristen, ed. Burlington: Ashgate, 2010. Fright Nights: The Horror of M. R. James. New Yorker (13 Feb. 2012): 105–08.

Lacefield, Kristen, ed. Lovecraft, Howard Philips. The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories. New York: Penguin, 1999. The Dreams in the Witch House and Other Weird Stories.

In 1991, the publication of Koji Suzuki's Ring, the first novel of a bestselling trilogy, inaugurated a tremendous outpouring of cultural production in Japan, Korea, and the United States. Just as the subject of the book is the deadly viral reproduction of a VHS tape, so, too, is the vast proliferation of text and cinematic productions suggestive of an airborne contagion with a life of its own. Analyzing the extraordinary trans-cultural popularity of the Ring phenomenon, The Scary Screen locates much of its power in the ways in which the books and films astutely graft contemporary cultural preoccupations onto the generic elements of the ghost story”in particular, the Japanese ghost story. At the same time, the contributors demonstrate, these cultural concerns are themselves underwritten by a range of anxieties triggered by the advent of new communications and media technologies, perhaps most significantly, the shift from analog to digital. Mimicking the phenomenon it seeks to understand, the collection's power comes from its commitment to the full range of Ring-related output and its embrace of a wide variety of interpretive approaches, as the contributors chart the mutations of the Ring narrative from author to author, from medium to medium, and from Japan to Korea to the United States.