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eBook Unknowing: The Work of Modernist Fiction ePub

eBook Unknowing: The Work of Modernist Fiction ePub

by Philip Weinstein

  • ISBN: 0801443709
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Philip Weinstein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 308
  • ePub book: 1559 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1337 kb
  • Other: mbr txt azw txt
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 577

Description

The modernist work of "unknowing" is cannily contrasted to the postmodern projects of Calvino, Rushdie, Garcia Marquez, and Morrison, with some surprising results.

His wide-ranging narrative gives us a valuable new vision of the modern novel's evolution as a critical apparatus of self-knowledge. John T. Matthews, Boston University). The modernist work of "unknowing" is cannily contrasted to the postmodern projects of Calvino, Rushdie, Garcia Marquez, and Morrison, with some surprising results. The contrasts Weinstein notes between Faulkner and Garcia Marquez, and between Faulkner and Toni Morrison, are beautifully delineated. No contemporary critic writes more subtly or more lucidly than Philip Weinstein.

Philip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to unknowing by addressing. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Unknowing: The Work of Modernist Fiction as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Philip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to "unknowing" by addressing the work of three supreme experimental writers: Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner. In their novels, the narrative props that support the drama of coming to know are refused. When space turns uncanny rather than lawful, when time ceases to be linear and progressive, objects and others become unfamiliar. So does the subject seeking to know them.

Borrowing the words Philip Weinstein uses to describe the modernist project of Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner, one could say that these two studies of the modernist novel "attend to the blind spots" of the "realist model of achieved knowledge and self-knowledge," an. .

Philip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to "unknowing" by addressing the work of three supreme experimental writers: Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner

Philip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to "unknowing" by addressing the work of three supreme experimental writers: Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner. Philip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to "unknowing" by addressing the work of three supreme experimental writers: Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner.

Book DescriptionPhilip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to "unknowing" by addressing the work of three supreme experimental writers: Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner.

Modernist and unknowing in relation to what premodernist commitment to knowing? . It has long been recognized that Western realist fiction, rising into prominence in the eighteenth century and reaching its acme in the nineteenth, is broadly indebted to earlier Enlightenment premises.

Modernist and unknowing in relation to what premodernist commitment to knowing? Modernist and unknowing in relation to what postmodern and postcolonial stances toward knowing? . Current cultural work, however, tends to stay closer to the practices of the place and time in question. The significance of realism, like that of modernism that follows it, is typically assumed to be inextricable from the contextual weave of contemporary social and conceptual procedures.

2 Henry James, „The Art of Fiction‟ (1894) Modernism: An Anthology .

2 Henry James, „The Art of Fiction‟ (1894) Modernism: An Anthology of Sources and Documents, V. Kolocotroni, J. Goldman, O. Taxidou eds. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998) 147-150 . 47. 22 Miller (1999), . 03 23 Samuel Beckett, Watt, . 24 Phillip Weinstein, Unknowing: The Work of Modernist Fiction (Cornell University Press, 2005) . 25 Joseph Conrad, The Outcast of the Islands . 2 26 Peters (2001), . 5.

Philip Weinstein is Alexander Griswold Cummins Professor of English at Swarthmore College. He teaches seminars in Modern Comparative Literature, as well as a range of courses in American and British fiction

Philip Weinstein explores the modernist commitment to "unknowing" by addressing the work of three supreme experimental writers: Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner. In their novels, the narrative props that support the drama of coming to know are refused. When space turns uncanny rather than lawful, when time ceases to be linear and progressive, objects and others become unfamiliar. So does the subject seeking to know them. Weinstein argues that modernist texts work, by way of surprise and arrest, to subvert the familiarity and narrative progression intrinsic to realist fiction. Rather than staging the drama of coming to know, they stage the drama of coming to unknow. The signature move of modernism is shock, just as resolution is the trademark of realism.Kafka, Proust, and Faulkner wrought their most compelling experimental effects by undermining an earlier Enlightenment project of knowing. Weinstein draws on major Enlightenment thinkers to identify constituent components of the narrative of "coming to know"―the progressive narrative underwriting two centuries of Western realist fiction. The book proceeds by framing modernist unknowing between prior practices of realist knowing, on the one hand, and, on the other, certain later practices―postmodern and postcolonial―that move beyond knowing altogether. In so doing, Weinstein proposes a metahistory of the Western novel, from Daniel Defoe to Toni Morrison.

Comments

Lli Lli
Philip Weinstein's Unknowing: The Work of Modernist Fiction is brilliant criticism and a bravura performance. One of our most thoughtful and eloquent critics of the novel, Weinstein's new book is his most ambitious and impressive work thus far. He begins with a tour de force "genealogy of realism," defining the western narrative project of "coming to know" one's self and one's world. This dazzling chapter is a miniature liberal arts course, preparing us for "the work of modernist fiction," from Flaubert to Beckett, with particular emphasis on Proust, Kafka, and Faulkner.

Professor of English at Swarthmore College, Weinstein is a legendary teacher and extraordinary writer. Fluent in French and versed in theory, he makes complex texts clear and compelling. Unknowing explains how theorists from Freud to Levinas, Jameson, Bakhtin, and Lyotard illuminate fiction and interrogate the Enlightenment assumptions of Locke, Descartes, Newton, and Kant.

The principle virtues of this remarkable inquiry are its provocative, engaging insights into the novels themselves-Absalom, Absalom, Beloved, The Satanic Verses, Passage to India, and many more--with special emphasis on the premises and style of the individual writers. The modernist work of "unknowing" is cannily contrasted to the postmodern projects of Calvino, Rushdie, Garcia Marquez, and Morrison, with some surprising results. The contrasts Weinstein notes between Faulkner and Garcia Marquez, and between Faulkner and Toni Morrison, are beautifully delineated. No contemporary critic writes more subtly or more lucidly than Philip Weinstein. Anyone who values literature and ideas, or despairs of the state of the humanities, will be exhilarated by this magnificent book.
Usaxma Usaxma
Very deep reading. Not going to nonchalantly peruse this book (my opinion). I enjoyed it, and it was helpful for upper level literature elective.